Literary Criticism

Postmodernism, or, The Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism

Author: Fredric Jameson

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 461

View: 365

Now in paperback, Fredric Jameson’s most wide-ranging work seeks to crystalize a definition of ”postmodernism”. Jameson’s inquiry looks at the postmodern across a wide landscape, from “high” art to “low” from market ideology to architecture, from painting to “punk” film, from video art to literature.
Literary Criticism

Late Postmodernism

Author: J. Green

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 254

View: 901

Does the novel have a future? Questions of this kind, which are as old as the novel itself, acquired a fresh urgency at the end of the twentieth-century with the rise of new media and the relegation of literature to the margins of American culture. As a result, anxieties about readership, cultural authority and literary value have come to preoccupy a second generation of postmodern novelists. Through close analysis of several major novels of the past decade, including works by Don DeLillo, Philip Roth, Kathryn Davis, Jonathan Franzen and Richard Powers, Late Postmodernism examines the forces shaping contemporary literature and the remarkable strategies American writers have adopted to make sense of their place in culture.
Poetry

Minding the Underworld

Author: Paul Christensen

Publisher: David R. Godine Publisher

ISBN:

Category: Poetry

Page: 246

View: 371

In this, the first full-length study of Clayton Eshleman's poetry, poet and scholar Paul Christensen descends into the torch-lit underworld, the cave of the soul, that Eshleman has been exploring in his work for more than three decades. "In the caves of Dordogne," Christensen writes, "Eshleman discovered an underworld in actuality, a labyrinth in which Paleolithic humanity daubed and slashed their marks, their primordial psychic images." He also found a controlling metaphor for all his mature poetry: "For Eshleman, these markings were a first language, and they represent the primal separation between sleep and waking," between the darkness of pre-consciousness and the light of self-awareness, between the amoral animal (which simply "is") and the guilty man (who is tortured by the realization "I am").
Art

Postmodernism and the Postsocialist Condition

Author: Aleš Erjavec

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 297

View: 388

"This crucial study presents an epic narrative of how postmodernism gave the artists of Eastern and Central Europe the expressive means to work their way out from the ruins of state socialism into the global art world in which their compatriots in the West are themselves struggling to find their identity. The authors bring to consciousness the art history of the present from important and unsuspected perspectives. This is not just a book for specialists-it is for everyone who lives the life of art in unprecedented times."—Arthur C. Danto, author of After the End of Art: Contemporary Art and the Pale of History "A fascinating document in the understanding of one of the decisive cultural moments in the postmodern world. The book's diversity of approaches illuminates both postmodern art and politics from a distinctive angle. Postmodernism and the Postsocialist Condition is likely to become a significant primary source for future cultural historians."—Paul Crowther, author of The Transhistorical Image: Philosophizing Art and Its History "This fine volume deals with the postmodernist approaches that helped artists and intellectuals cope with political reality after socialism and provided the means to face the cultural vacuum without regressing to premodern attitudes. The book suggests that dissenting voices have a better chance to be heard in smaller countries like Hungary, Cuba, Slovenia, and other republics of the former Yugoslavia. It should indeed make us pay more attention to what has happened and is happening in these countries as well as in larger countries like Russia and China."—Wolfgang Welsch, author of Undoing Aesthetics "This collection genuinely crackles with vitality. Tracking postmodernism far away from the canonical centers of the modern, it presents an exhilarating patchwork of mythic repetitions, sociopolitical reflections, and sheer creative exuberance."—Stephen Bann, University of Bristol
Literary Criticism

New Media and the Transformation of Postmodern American Literature

Author: Casey Michael Henry

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 216

View: 365

How has American literature after postmodernism responded to the digital age? Drawing on insights from contemporary media theory, this is the first book to explore the explosion of new media technologies as an animating context for contemporary American literature. Casey Michael Henry examines the intertwining histories of new media forms since the 1970s and literary postmodernism and its aftermath, from William Gaddis's J R and Bret Easton Ellis's American Psycho through to David Foster Wallace's Infinite Jest. Through these histories, the book charts the ways in which print-based postmodern writing at first resisted new mass media forms and ultimately came to respond to them.
Philosophy

Postmodernism - Local Effects, Global Flows

Author: Vincent B. Leitch

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 195

View: 930

Offers readable case studies in postmodern economics, philosophy, literary criticism, feminism, pedagogy, poetry, painting, historiography, and cultural studies, showing disorganization as characteristic of postmodern times.
Literary Criticism

Late Postmodernism

Author: J. Green

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 254

View: 992

Does the novel have a future? Questions of this kind, which are as old as the novel itself, acquired a fresh urgency at the end of the twentieth-century with the rise of new media and the relegation of literature to the margins of American culture. As a result, anxieties about readership, cultural authority and literary value have come to preoccupy a second generation of postmodern novelists. Through close analysis of several major novels of the past decade, including works by Don DeLillo, Philip Roth, Kathryn Davis, Jonathan Franzen and Richard Powers, Late Postmodernism examines the forces shaping contemporary literature and the remarkable strategies American writers have adopted to make sense of their place in culture.
Literary Criticism

The Routledge Introduction to American Postmodernism

Author: Linda Wagner-Martin

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 170

View: 602

The Routledge Introduction to American Postmodernism offers readers a fresh, insightful overview to all genres of postmodern writing. Drawing on a variety of works from not only mainstream authors but also those that are arguably unconventional, renowned scholar Linda Wagner-Martin gives the reader a solid framework and foundation to reading, understanding, and appreciating postmodern literature since its inception through the present day.
Study Aids

Gale Researcher Guide for: Thomas Pynchon and Emerging Postmodernism

Author: Ian D. Copestake

Publisher: Gale, Cengage Learning

ISBN:

Category: Study Aids

Page: 7

View: 621

Gale Researcher Guide for: Thomas Pynchon and Emerging Postmodernism is selected from Gale's academic platform Gale Researcher. These study guides provide peer-reviewed articles that allow students early success in finding scholarly materials and to gain the confidence and vocabulary needed to pursue deeper research.
Literary Collections

Technology and Postmodern Subjectivity in Don DeLillo's Novels

Author: Randy Laist

Publisher: Peter Lang

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 212

View: 490

More than any other major American author, Don DeLillo has examined the manner in which contemporary American consciousness has been shaped by the historically unique incursion into daily life of information, military, and consumer technologies. In DeLillo's fictions, technological apparatuses are not merely set-pieces in the characters' environments, nor merely tools to move the plot along, they are sites of mystery and magic, whirlpools of space-time, and convex mirrors of identity. Television sets, filmic images, automobiles, airplanes, telephones, computers, and nuclear bombs are not simply objects in the world for DeLillo's characters; they are psychological phenomena that shape the possibilities for action, influence the nature of perception, and incorporate themselves into the fabric of memory and identity. DeLillo is a phenomenologist of the contemporary technoscape and an ecologist of our new kind of natural habitat. Through a close reading of four DeLillo novels, Technology and Postmodern Subjectivity in Don DeLillo's Novels examines the variety of modes in which DeLillo's fictions illustrate the technologically mediated confluence of his human subjects and the field of cultural objects in which they discover themselves. The model of interactionism between human beings and technological instruments that is implicit in DeLillo's writing suggests significant applications both to the study of other contemporary novelists as well as to contemporary cultural studies.
Social Science

Ludic Feminism and After

Author: Teresa L. Ebert

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 338

View: 924

A provocative and controversial challenge to postmodern academic feminism
Social Science

Desire and De-scription

Author: Zsófia Bán

Publisher: Rodopi

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 129

View: 852

This volume, without negating Williams' strong ties with modernism, intends to dislodge this deeply ingrained critical positioning by presenting him as an overlooked figure in the emerging tradition of postmodernism. The study advances the claim that Williams clearly recognized this nascent discourse and, rather than pursuing his earlier mode of writing, consciously sought a new language for a rapidly changing cultural context. Drawing on wide-ranging, multidisciplinary critical texts, this book will be of interest not only to Williams scholars but to all those who continue to be intrigued by the elusive boundaries between word and image as well as modernism and postmodernism.
Literary Criticism

The Routledge Companion to Postmodernism

Author: Stuart Sim

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 352

View: 730

This fully revised third edition of The Routledge Companion to Postmodernism provides the ideal introduction to postmodernist thought. Featuring contributions from a cast of international scholars, the Companion contains 19 detailed essays on major themes and topics along with an A-Z of key terms and concepts. As well as revised essays on philosophy, politics, literature, and more, the first section now contains brand new essays on critical theory, business, gender and the performing arts. The concepts section, too, has been enhanced with new topics ranging from hypermedia to global warming. Students interested in any aspect of postmodernism will continue to find this an indispensable resource.

From Late Modernism to Postmodernism

Author: Salisbury

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 224

View: 874

From Late Modernism to Postmodernism introduces, debates and extends the arguments surrounding the critical relevance of the terms ālate modernismā and āpostmodernismā for describing cultural products and intellectual contexts from the 1930s to the present. It provides an overview of the critical terrain of modernism and postmodernism and a reworking of the relationship between them that explores their historical appearance and reach alongside their intellectual and cultural contexts. The book considers such key topics as theories of literary modernism, late modernism and postmodernism; the avant-garde and mass culture; race, nationhood and the postcolonial; the relationship between literature, art, architecture and television; and influential philosophies of modernity and postmodernity. While it concentrates on the canonical authors of Anglophone late modernism and postmodernism - Beckett, Nabokov, Auster, Coetzee, Rushdie, Larkin, Prynne - it also introduces readings of less well-known texts by authors such as Mina Loy, Djuna Barnes, Sam Selvon and B. S. Johnson, to demonstrate the aesthetic breadth of late modernism and postmodernism.Key Features* A thorough overview of theories of modernism, late modernism, and postmodernism* Addresses key topics: the avant-garde, mass culture, race, nationhood, the postcolonial* Discusses literature in relation to art, architecture, and television* Provides detailed readings of canonical and less well known authors
Business & Economics

Postmodern Management and Organization Theory

Author: David Boje

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 424

View: 797

This thought-provoking critique of postmodern theory provides an overview of issues as they relate to management and organization theory and its history, and assembles a variety of important works on postmodern philosophy - including feminist and cultural postmodern philosophies. Addressing the future of the postmodern influence on management and organization theory and method, the book also establishes an agenda for future research.
Literary Criticism

Weldon Kees and the Arts at Midcentury

Author: Daniel A. Siedell

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 238

View: 860

Born in 1914 in Beatrice, Nebraska, and presumed dead in 1955 (when he apparently leapt from the Golden Gate Bridge), Weldon Kees has become one of the better-known ?unknown? American poets of the twentieth century, his fiction and poetry largely kept alive by other poets. But Kees was also that rare artist who excelled in many genres and media: a skillful painter, filmmaker, jazz musician, and composer. He was a gifted critic as well, and his criticism bears the marks of his own deep and broad engagement with the arts.øWeldon Kees and the Arts at Midcentury is the first book to reflect the full range and reach of Kees?s artistic activities. Bringing together writers from various disciplines?art historians, poets, literary critics, curators, and cultural scholars, including Dore Ashton, James Reidel, Dana Gioia, and Stephen C. Foster?this volume offers a wide variety of perspectives through which to evaluate the meaning and significance of Kees?s achievement. Although the essays themselves partake of the diversity of Kees?s impact on the culture, all agree on one fundamental point: any history of postwar American culture that neglects Kees?s multifaceted contribution is ultimately incomplete.
Language Arts & Disciplines

Reading the Canon

Author: Philipp Löffler

Publisher: BoD – Books on Demand

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 468

View: 997

‘Reading the Canon’ explores the relation between the production of literary value and the problem of periodization, tracing how literary tastes, particular reader communities, and sites of literary learning shape the organization of literature in historical perspective. Rather than suggesting a political critique of the canon, this book shows that the production of literary relevance and its tacit hierarchies of value are necessary consequences of how reading and writing are organized as social practices within different fields of literary activity. ‘Reading the Canon’ offers a comprehensive theoretical account of the conundrums still defining contemporary debates about literary value; the book also features a series of historically-inflected author studies—from classics, such as Shakespeare and Thomas Pynchon, to less likely figures, such as John Neal and Owen Johnson—that illustrate how the idea of literary relevance has been appropriated throughout history and across a variety of national and transnational literary institutions.
Philosophy

Negotiating Postmodernism

Author: Wayne Gabardi

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 192

View: 346

Joining the modern-postmodern debate, this book suggests that the polarizing polemics of the radical postmodernists who once dominated the discussion have given way to a new critical postmodernism characterized by dialogue, accommodation, and synthesis. A comprehensive survey, Negotiating Postmodernism also marks the arrival of a powerful, critical presence on the scene, one that advances the idea of a late modern-postmodern social and cultural transition.
Literary Criticism

American Fiction in Transition

Author: Adam Kelly

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 176

View: 824

American Fiction in Transition is a study of the observer-hero narrative, a highly significant but critically neglected genre of the American novel. Through the lens of this transitional genre, the book explores the 1990s in relation to debates about the end of postmodernism, and connects the decade to other transitional periods in US literature. Novels by four major contemporary writers are examined: Philip Roth, Paul Auster, E. L. Doctorow and Jeffrey Eugenides. Each novel has a similar structure: an observer-narrator tells the story of an important person in his life who has died. But each story is equally about the struggle to tell the story, to find adequate means to narrate the transitional quality of the hero's life. In playing out this narrative struggle, each novel thereby addresses the broader problem of historical transition, a problem that marks the legacy of the postmodern era in American literature and culture.
Literary Criticism

Black Subjects

Author: Arlene Keizer

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 224

View: 767

Writers as diverse as Carolivia Herron, Charles Johnson, Paule Marshall, Toni Morrison, and Derek Walcott have addressed the history of slavery in their literary works. In this groundbreaking new book, Arlene R. Keizer contends that these writers theorize the nature and formation of the black subject and engage established theories of subjectivity in their fiction and drama by using slave characters and the condition of slavery as focal points. In this book, Keizer examines theories derived from fictional works in light of more established theories of subject formation, such as psychoanalysis, Althusserian interpellation, performance theory, and theories about the formation of postmodern subjects under late capitalism. Black Subjects shows how African American and Caribbean writers' theories of identity formation, which arise from the varieties of black experience re-imagined in fiction, force a reconsideration of the conceptual bases of established theories of subjectivity. The striking connections Keizer draws between these two bodies of theory contribute significantly to African American and Caribbean Studies, literary theory, and critical race and ethnic studies.