Legal Authority in Premodern Islam

Author: Fachrizal A. Halim

Publisher: Culture and Civilization in the Middle East

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 132

View: 373

"This book presents a comprehensive picture of the structure of authority in Islamic law. It does this specifically within the Shafi'ite legal tradition and the novel aspects of al-Nawawi's legacy and contributions"--
Religion

Legal Authority in Premodern Islam

Author: Fachrizal A. Halim

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 150

View: 199

Offering a detailed analysis of the structure of authority in Islamic law, this book focuses on the figure of Yahya b. Sharaf al-Nawawi, who is regarded as the chief contributor to the legal tradition known as the Shafi'imadhhab in traditional Muslim sources, named after Muhammad b. Idris al-Shafi'i (d. 204/820), the supposed founder of the school of law. Al-Nawawi's legal authority is situated in a context where Muslims demanded to stabilize legal disposition that is consistent with the authority of themadhhab, since in premodern Islamic society, the ruling powers did not produce or promulgate law, as was the case in other, monarchic civilizations. Al-Nawawi's place in the long-term formation of themadhhab is significant for many reasons but for one in particular: his effort in reconciling the two major interpretive communities among the Shafi'ites, i.e., the tariqas of the Iraqians and Khurasanians. This book revisits the history of the Shafi'i school in the pre-Nawawic era and explores its later development in the post-Nawawic period. Presenting a comprehensive picture of the structure of authority in Islamic law, specifically within the Shafi'ite legal tradition, this book is an essential resource for students and scholars of Islamic Studies, History and Law.
Religion

Legal Authority in Premodern Islam

Author: Fachrizal A. Halim

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 132

View: 187

Offering a detailed analysis of the structure of authority in Islamic law, this book focuses on the figure of Yahyā b. Sharaf al-Nawawī, who is regarded as the chief contributor to the legal tradition known as the Shāfi'ī madhhab in traditional Muslim sources, named after Muhammad b. Idrīs al-Shāfi'ī (d. 204/820), the supposed founder of the school of law. Al-Nawawī’s legal authority is situated in a context where Muslims demanded to stabilize legal disposition that is consistent with the authority of the madhhab, since in premodern Islamic society, the ruling powers did not produce or promulgate law, as was the case in other, monarchic civilizations. Al-Nawawī’s place in the long-term formation of the madhhab is significant for many reasons but for one in particular: his effort in reconciling the two major interpretive communities among the Shāfi'ites, i.e., the tarīqas of the Iraqians and Khurasanians. This book revisits the history of the Shāfi'ī school in the pre-Nawawic era and explores its later development in the post-Nawawic period. Presenting a comprehensive picture of the structure of authority in Islamic law, specifically within the Shafi’ite legal tradition, this book is an essential resource for students and scholars of Islamic Studies, History and Law.
History

Islamic Law in Circulation

Author: Mahmood Kooria

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 393

An exploration of the spread and survival of Islamic legal ideas and commentaries in the Eastern Mediterranean and the Indian Ocean regions in the second millennium CE.
Law

Locating the Sharīʿa

Author: Sohaira Siddiqui

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 272

View: 811

This volume is intended for both the novice and expert as a companion to understanding the evolution of the field of Islamic law, the current work that is shaping this field, and the new directions the sharīʿa will take in the twenty-first/fifteenth century.
History

Monsoon Islam

Author: Sebastian R. Prange

Publisher: Cambridge Oceanic Histories

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 358

View: 212

Reveals a distinct trajectory of Islamic history that developed among Muslim merchant communities across the medieval Indian Ocean.
Law

Islamic Law in Modern Courts

Author: Haider Ala Hamoudi

Publisher: Wolters Kluwer

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 792

View: 158

Islamic Law in Modern Courts provides an easily accessible introduction to Islamic law written specifically for law students and legal professionals, and designed to be taught not only by Islamic law specialists, but also by those working in related fields such as law and religion or comparative legal systems. Framed as a casebook, the text uses translations of judicial decisions involving real-world legal disputes to present a picture of Islamic law as it is actually applied in the contemporary world. The casebook draws on material from a variety of countries but focuses primarily on two jurisdictions. Cases from Indonesia exemplify the law of the majority Sunni branch of Islam, while cases from Iraq reflect the influence of both Sunni and Shi’a law. The casebook begins with a brief introduction to the religion of Islam and the sources, methods, and historical development of Islamic law. Four substantive law chapters cover the main subjects over which Islamic law continues to exert significant influence. These include inheritance law, the law of marriage and divorce, Islamic finance and charitable foundations, and Islamic criminal law. A final chapter examines constitutional adjudication of issues related to Islamic law. Key Features: Examines Islamic law as state law that is enforced by national courts but with roots in and ongoing connections with the rich classical tradition. Designed for use by both experts in Islamic law as well as faculty who have an interest in Islamic law but lack extensive background in the subject. Cases are accompanied by commentary that explains and situates the doctrine applied in the decision and suggests questions for classroom discussion. The five substantive law chapters are self-contained units that permit instructors to design a course that focuses on subject areas of particular interest.
Law

Islamic Law and International Human Rights Law

Author: Anver M. Emon

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 416

View: 161

The relationship between Islamic law and international human rights law has been the subject of considerable, and heated, debate in recent years. The usual starting point has been to test one system by the standards of the other, asking is Islamic law 'compatible' with international human rights standards, or vice versa. This approach quickly ends in acrimony and accusations of misunderstanding. By overlaying one set of norms on another we overlook the deeply contextual nature of how legal rules operate in a society, and meaningful comparison and discussion is impossible. In this volume, leading experts in Islamic law and international human rights law attempt to deepen the understanding of human rights and Islam, paving the way for a more meaningful debate. Focusing on central areas of controversy, such as freedom of speech and religion, gender equality, and minority rights, the authors examine the contextual nature of how Islamic law and international human rights law are legitimately formed, interpreted, and applied within a community. They examine how these fundamental interests are recognized and protected within the law, and what restrictions are placed on the freedoms associated with them. By examining how each system recognizes and limits fundamental freedoms, this volume clears the ground for exploring the relationship between Islamic law and international human rights law on a sounder footing. In doing so it offers a challenging and distinctive contribution to the literature on the subject, and will be an invaluable reference for students, academics, and policy-makers engaged in the legal and religious debates surrounding Islam and the West.
Religion

Routledge Handbook of Islamic Law

Author: Khaled Abou El Fadl

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 450

View: 406

This handbook is a detailed reference source comprising original articles covering the origins, history, theory and practice of Islamic law. The handbook starts out by dealing with the question of what type of law is Islamic law and includes a critical analysis of the pedagogical approaches to studying and analysing Islamic law as a discipline. The handbook covers a broad range of issues, including the role of ethics in Islamic jurisprudence, the mechanics and processes of interpretation, the purposes and objectives of Islamic law, constitutional law and secularism, gender, bioethics, Muslim minorities in the West, jihad and terrorism. Previous publications on this topic have approached Islamic law from a variety of disciplinary and pedagogical perspectives. One of the original features of this handbook is that it treats Islamic law as a legal discipline by taking into account the historical functions and processes of legal cultures and the patterns of legal thought. With contributions from a selection of highly regarded and leading scholars in this field, the Routledge Handbook of Islamic Law is an essential resource for students and scholars who are interested in the field of Islamic Law.
Religion

Islamic Law

Author: Ahmad Atif Ahmad

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 224

View: 840

Introducing undergraduate students to Islamic law, this accessible textbook does not presume legal or technical knowledge. Drawing on a comparative approach, it encourages students to think through the issues of the application of Islamic law where Muslims live as a majority and where they live as a minority, including the USA, Saudia Arabia, Egypt, Pakistan. The book surveys the historical development as well as the contemporary contexts of Islamic law. In distilling the history of Islamic law for non-specialists, the author covers important topics such as the development and transformation of Islamic institutions before and after colonialism. Coverage of Islamic law across contemporary contexts draws on real case material, and allows for discussion of Islam as a legal and a moral code that is activated both inside and outside the court. Readers will learn about rituals, dietary restrictions, family, contracts and property, lawful and unlawful gain, criminal law and punishments, and what makes a government legitimate in the eyes of Muslim individuals and authorities.