Leyland Lorries

Author: Bill Reid

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 96

View: 368

The origins of Leyland lorries are found in steam wagon manufacture in the town of Leyland, Lancashire. The manufacturer, then known as the Lancashire Steam Motor Company, was established in 1884. By 1904 the first petrol-engined lorry was built and in 1907 the company name was changed to Leyland Motors Limited. Leyland produced a range of vehicles over the following decades, from steam wagons and petrol-engined lorries to bus and, eventually, eight-wheeled lorries. The post-war years saw a series of mergers and acquisitions, including the eventual merger with the British Motor Corporation in the late 1960s leading to the creation of British Leyland. For the enthusiast, Leyland produced a wide range of vehicles over the years for both the domestic and international market. Lavishly illustrated with an array of rare and unpublished photographs, Leyland Lorries is the perfect companion for anyone wanting to learn more of the Leyland story.
Transportation

History of the Leyland Bus

Author: Ron Phillips

Publisher: Crowood

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 192

View: 108

A superbly illustrated history of the Leyland bus, one of the most important British buses of the twentieth century, with full production histories and technical specifications for all the major models. Also covers the evolution of the Leyland Bus company, and tells the full story behind the iconic Leyland badge. Including some previously unseen illustrations, the book gives a full company history - from beginnings as the Lancashire Steam Motor Company in 1886, to the acquisition by Volvo Buses in 1988. Technical details of all the main models are given including the Lion, Titan and Olympic ranges. Gearless buses and rear-engined double-deckers are covered as well as charabancs, trolleybuses, First World War military vehicles and overseas models. This will be an essential guide to these much-treasured vehicles and is beautifully illustrated with some never-before-seen pictures from the Leyland company's archives including 153 black & white photographs and 106 colour and b&w prints.
Business & Economics

Share Trading, Fraud and the Crash of 1929

Author: Chris Swinson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 212

View: 722

This is the first comprehensive biography of Clarence Charles Hatry, 1888-1965, an enigmatic and charismatic public figure. Hatry was the son of Jewish immigrant parents who became a company promoter and whose companies collapsed in 1929, leading to a crash on the London stock exchange. He was brought down by a desperate fraud. At his trial three months later, the judge said that he could not imagine a worse crime. Analysing transactions in detail, the book reveals Hatry’s brilliance as a manipulator and a world-class networker and persuader. It also demonstrates his vain belief in his ability to overcome any risks and his insecurity which led him to surround himself with sycophants who would not challenge his ideas. It shows how others used Hatry to make money, and, as he destroyed himself, as a scapegoat who distracted from the City’s failings. Despite his deepest ambitions, he remained an outsider. Until now there has been no full biography of Clarence Hatry, which may be attributable to the lack of records, as his business papers are believed all to have been destroyed. This comprehensive biography is based on examination of the memoirs of Hatry’s contemporaries, the archives and records which they and their companies preserved, and press reports of Hatry’s activities. Marking the 90th anniversary of Hatry’s collapse, this book will be important reading for academics and researchers looking to gain a greater understanding of the context of the 1929 crash, or of financial crises generally.
History

Road Haulage by Motor in Britain

Author: Thomas Gibson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 362

View: 691

This title was first published in 2001. A general introduction to the study of motorised road haulage in Britain from its beginng up to the outbreak of the Second World War (1904-1940). Filling a gap in market, this is the first work to offer a broad survey into the subject, and is intended to stimulate further interest and debate.

U Can Do It

Author: Frederick H. Brown

Publisher: Trafford Publishing

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 399

View: 196

Determination, application, humour and betrayal are all to be met in this book. Family life, three careers the last becoming a barrister at 46 years of age. Then 19 years in practice.
Shipping

Report

Author: Commonwealth Shipping Committee

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Shipping

Page:

View: 208

Automobile industry and trade

Leyland

Author: Leyland Motor Corporation, ltd

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Automobile industry and trade

Page: 55

View: 497

History

Wait for the Waggon

Author: John Sutton

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 344

The first ever published comprehensive history of the Royal Corps of Transport and its Predecessors, relating the proud part played in helping to develop the highly successful logistic system that the British Army now possesses.
Fiction

Post of Honour

Author: R. F. Delderfield

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 672

View: 306

1912-1940 A generation fallen. A country that will never be the same again. Nowhere in England avoids the searing loss of young men during the First World War and the remote Devon village of Shallowford is no exception. Many never return and the lives of those who do come back are changed forever. Paul Craddock must try to rebuild the estate and, with more difficulty, the bonds broken between the people who belong there. It is a time of huge social change and there are challenges in peace as hard to surmount as those of war. And before they are met, Germany once again threatens the stability of Europe and a way of life so hard won.
History

The Baby Killers

Author: Thomas Fegan

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 759

Just over a decade after the Wright Brothers’ triumph of powered flight, the conduct of war was changed for ever. Until the Kaiser’s Zeppelins raided British cities and towns, it had been unthinkable that civilian populations and property hundreds of miles from the battlefield could be at risk from sudden death and destruction. In the first section of The ‘Baby Killers’ Thomas Fegan charts the precise chronology of the air raids on Britain in this most thorough and fascinating work. From the start-point of the doom-laden prophecies of HG Wells and others, he describes the development of the German threat and the desperate search for answers to it. He analyses public reaction and assesses the effectiveness of the campaign as it progressed from airships to Gotha heavy bombers and, later, ‘Giants’. The second part of this superbly researched book features a gazetteer to the places bombed. The extent of the list, which includes Edinburgh, Hull and Greater Manchester, will almost certainly surprise most readers. Helpfully there are also comprehensive lists of memorials and relevant museums. The ‘Baby Killers’ provides a chilling insight into an aspect of The Great War which is all too often overlooked. Yet, at the time, these raids, while modest compared with those of the Second World War Blitz, shook national morale and instilled great fear and outrage. This is an important and highly readable work.
Iron industry and trade

Iron and Steel

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Iron industry and trade

Page:

View: 661

Vols. - include as a regular number the papers presented at the annual meeting of the Iron and Steel Institute.