London (England)

London's Lost Rivers

Author: Tom Bolton

Publisher: Strange Attractor

ISBN:

Category: London (England)

Page: 272

View: 383

"The Thames is not London's only river. Traces of the capital's many forgotten waterways still remain--for thos who know where to look. London's lost rivers invites you along the routes of the city's lost rivers and deep into its history, with ten guided walks that combine clear maps and directions with richly detailed anecdotes. [It] reveals a subterranean network that spreads from picturesque Hampstead in the North to the suburbs of the South, and runs beneath some of London's most iconic sites and historic areas. Follow these forgotten trails, and the city's past is brought to vivid life, populated by famous and infamous characters."--Back cover.
Travel

London's Lost Rivers

Author: Paul Talling

Publisher: Random House

ISBN:

Category: Travel

Page: 190

View: 586

From the sources of the Fleet in Hampstead's ponds to the mouth of the Effra in Vauxhall, via the meander of the Westbourne through 'Knight's Bridge' and the Tyburn's curve along Marylebone Lane, London's Lost Rivers unearths the hidden waterways that flow beneath the streets of the capital. Paul Talling investigates how these rivers shaped the city - forming borough boundaries and transport networks, fashionable spas and stagnant slums - and how they all eventually gave way to railways, roads and sewers. Armed with his camera, he traces their routes and reveals their often overlooked remains: riverside pubs on the Old Kent Road, healing wells in King's Cross, 'stink pipes' in Hammersmith and gurgling gutters on streets across the city. Packed with maps and over 100 colour photographs, London's Lost Rivers uncovers the watery history of the city's most famous sights, bringing to life the very different London that lies beneath our feet.
Technology & Engineering

Rivers Lost, Rivers Regained

Author: Martin Knoll

Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Press

ISBN:

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 368

View: 596

Many cities across the globe are rediscovering their rivers. After decades or even centuries of environmental decline and cultural neglect, waterfronts have been vamped up and become focal points of urban life again; hidden and covered streams have been daylighted while restoration projects have returned urban rivers in many places to a supposedly more natural state. This volume traces the complex and winding history of how cities have appropriated, lost, and regained their rivers. But rather than telling a linear story of progress, the chapters of this book highlight the ambivalence of these developments. The four sections in Rivers Lost, Rivers Regained discuss how cities have gained control and exerted power over rivers and waterways far upstream and downstream; how rivers and floodplains in cityscapes have been transformed by urbanization and industrialization; how urban rivers have been represented in cultural manifestations, such as novels and songs; and how more recent strategies work to redefine and recreate the place of the river within the urban setting. At the nexus between environmental, urban, and water histories, Rivers Lost, Rivers Regained points out how the urban-river relationship can serve as a prime vantage point to analyze fundamental issues of modern environmental attitudes and practices.
Medical

Pleistocene History of the Lower Thames Valley

Author: Philip Leonard Gibbard

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 229

View: 458

The Lower Thames Valley is a classic area for British Pleistocene studies. The valley contains a sequence of River Thames deposits representing approximately the last 300,000 years, including older, highly fragmented and eroded sediments derived from Thames tributaries and glaciation. The region includes some of the most important palaeolithic archaeological sites in the country which, although extensively studied, have never previously been fitted into a regional context. The area also includes some of the most important fossiliferous localities in the country, several of which have been at the centre of controversies regarding the sequence of events in the British Pleistocene. This regional investigation clarifies the problems by presenting the geological sequence in detail and establishing the relationship of these localities for the first time.
History

London

Author: Roy Porter

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 431

View: 485

An extraordinary city, London grew from a backwater in the Classical Age into an important medieval city and significant Renaissance urban center to a modern colossus--full of a free people ever evolving. Roy Porter touches the pulse of his hometown and makes it our own, capturing London's fortunes, people, and imperial glory with vigor and wit. 58 photos.
Biography & Autobiography

London

Author: Peter Ackroyd

Publisher: Doubleday

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 801

View: 725

A chronicle of the city from the time of the Druids to the beginning of the twenty-first century discusses its ability to grow and change, and describes stories of London's wealthy streets and impoverished alleys.
History

London's New River

Author: Robert Ward

Publisher: Phillimore

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 722

This is what will become the authoritative account of the creation of the New River in the 17th century, a channel from Hertfordshire to Clerkenwell just north of the City of London, which supplied the city and much of built up London north of the Thames with much needed fresh water for about two hundred years. It includes entirely new material as well as illustrations not previously used.