Performing Arts

Carmen, a Gypsy Geography

Author: Ninotchka Devorah Bennahum

Publisher: Wesleyan University Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 300

View: 515

The figure of Carmen has emerged as a cipher for the unfettered female artist. Dance historian and performance theorist Ninotchka Bennahum shows us Carmen as embodied historical archive, a figure through which we come to understand the promises and dangers of nomadic, transnational identity, and the immanence of performance as an expanded historical methodology. Bennahum traces the genealogy of the female Gypsy presence in her iconic operatic role from her genesis in the ancient Mediterranean world, her emergence as flamenco artist in the architectural spaces of Islamic Spain, her persistent manifestation in Picasso, and her contemporary relevance on stage. This many-layered geography of the Gypsy dancer provides the book with its unique nonlinear form that opens new pathways to reading performance and writing history. Includes rare archival photographs of Gypsy artists.
French literature

French Twentieth Bibliography

Author: Peter C. Hoy

Publisher: Susquehanna University Press

ISBN:

Category: French literature

Page: 608

View: 103

This series of bibliographical references is one of the most important tools for research in modern and contemporary French literature. No other bibliography represents the scholarly activities and publications of these fields as completely.
Agriculture

Annual Report of the Commissioner of Patents

Author: United States. Patent Office

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Agriculture

Page:

View: 640

Prior to 1862, when the Department of Agriculture was established, the report on agriculture was prepared and published by the Commissioner of Patents, and forms volume or part of volume, of his annual reports, the first being that of 1840. Cf. Checklist of public documents ... Washington, 1895, p. 148.
Art

The PCI Artists

Author: Juan José Gómez Gutiérrez

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 255

View: 270

This book examines the artistic policies of the Italian Communist Party (PCI) during the early post-war years (1944–1951), after the defeat of Fascism in Europe and the outbreak of the Cold War. It brings together theoretical debates on artists’ political engagement and an extensive critical apparatus, providing the reader with an historical framework for wider reflections on the relationship between art and politics. After 1944, the PCI became the biggest Communist organisation in the West, placing Italy in an ambiguous position regarding the other European countries. Nevertheless, the immediate strategy of the Communists was not revolution, but liberation from Fascism and the establishment of a democratic system from which a genuine Italian path to Socialism could be found. Taking Antonio Gramsci’s notion of hegemony as a theoretical basis, the Communists intended to generate a progressive social bloc capable of achieving wide consensus within civil society before taking power. In order to accomplish this goal, the collaboration from intellectuals was necessary. The artistic policy of the Italian Communist Party was tailored to this end, counting on representatives from all groups and tendencies of the time, particularly those artists who rejected the imperialistic, autarchic pseudo-classicism that characterised most of Italian art throughout the Fascist years. In the 1930s, international, Modernist and cosmopolitan European culture became an escape route to artists seeking a way out of the oppressive cultural atmosphere of inter-war Italy. However, in the 1940s and 1950s, many of these artists experienced a deep transformation in their work after they became politically involved with the PCI, and were exposed to international Communist culture – and Socialist Realism in particular. This was conveyed not only by conscious changes in their subjects, their style and their material means of expression, but also in the public they addressed and in their own conception of themselves as artistic authors. Hence, at a time when the world was divided into two opposed camps, each heavily inflected by ideological allegiance and supported by powerful propaganda apparatuses, Italian Communist artists became the protagonists of a novel intellectual-political project which pursued the synthesis between antagonistic cultural blocs.
Literary Criticism

French XX Bibliography

Author: Susquehanna University Press

Publisher: Susquehanna University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 272

View: 181

This series of bibliographical references is one of the most important tools for research in modern and contemporary French literature. No other bibliography represents the scholarly activities and publications of these fields as completely.
Art

Consuming Surrealism in American Culture

Author: Sandra Zalman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 228

View: 783

Consuming Surrealism in American Culture: Dissident Modernism argues that Surrealism worked as a powerful agitator to disrupt dominant ideas of modern art in the United States. Unlike standard accounts that focus on Surrealism in the U.S. during the 1940s as a point of departure for the ascendance of the New York School, this study contends that Surrealism has been integral to the development of American visual culture over the course of the twentieth century. Through analysis of Surrealism in both the museum and the marketplace, Sandra Zalman tackles Surrealism?s multi-faceted circulation as both elite and popular. Zalman shows how the American encounter with Surrealism was shaped by Alfred Barr, William Rubin and Rosalind Krauss as these influential curators mobilized Surrealism to compose, to concretize, or to unseat narratives of modern art in the 1930s, 1960s and 1980s - alongside Surrealism?s intersection with advertising, Magic Realism, Pop, and the rise of contemporary photography. As a popular avant-garde, Surrealism openly resisted art historical classification, forcing the supposedly distinct spheres of modernism and mass culture into conversation and challenging theories of modern art in which it did not fit, in large part because of its continued relevance to contemporary American culture.
Art

The Artwork Caught by the Tail

Author: George Baker

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 476

View: 693

This volume presents a study of the French artist and writer Francis Picabia (1879-1953). The author focuses on Picabia's work in Paris during the Dada years. He describes a series of nearly forgotten objects and events, from the almost lunatic range of the Paris Dada "manifestations" to Picabia's polemical writings ; from a lost work by Picabia in the form of a hole (called, suggestively, The Young Girl) to his "painting" Cacodylic Eye, covered in autographs by luminaries ranging from Ezra Pound to Fatty Arbuckle. Baker ends with readymades in prose: a vast interweaving of citations and quotations that converge to create a heated conversation among Picabia, André Breton, Tristan Tzara, James Joyce, Friedrich Nietzsche, Jacques Derrida, Gilles Deleuze, and others.
Architecture

Prague, Capital of the Twentieth Century

Author: Derek Sayer

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 624

View: 402

Setting out to recover the roots of modernity in the boulevards, interiors, and arcades of the "city of light," Walter Benjamin dubbed Paris "the capital of the nineteenth century." In this eagerly anticipated sequel to his acclaimed Coasts of Bohemia: A Czech History, Derek Sayer argues that Prague could well be seen as the capital of the much darker twentieth century. Ranging across twentieth-century Prague's astonishingly vibrant and always surprising human landscape, this richly illustrated cultural history describes how the city has experienced (and suffered) more ways of being modern than perhaps any other metropolis. Located at the crossroads of struggles between democratic, communist, and fascist visions of the modern world, twentieth-century Prague witnessed revolutions and invasions, national liberation and ethnic cleansing, the Holocaust, show trials, and snuffed-out dreams of "socialism with a human face." Yet between the wars, when Prague was the capital of Europe's most easterly parliamentary democracy, it was also a hotbed of artistic and architectural modernism, and a center of surrealism second only to Paris. Focusing on these years, Sayer explores Prague's spectacular modern buildings, monuments, paintings, books, films, operas, exhibitions, and much more. A place where the utopian fantasies of the century repeatedly unraveled, Prague was tailor-made for surrealist André Breton's "black humor," and Sayer discusses the way the city produced unrivaled connoisseurs of grim comedy, from Franz Kafka and Jaroslav Hasek to Milan Kundera and Václav Havel. A masterful and unforgettable account of a city where an idling flaneur could just as easily be a secret policeman, this book vividly shows why Prague can teach us so much about the twentieth century and what made us who we are.
History

Committed Styles

Author: Benjamin Kohlmann

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 228

View: 655

Committed Styles offers a new understanding of the politicized literature of the 1930s and its relationship to modernism. It reclaims a central body of literary and critical works for modernist studies, offering in-depth readings of texts by T.S. Eliot and I.A. Richards, as well as by key left-wing authors including William Empson, David Gascoyne, Charles Madge, Humphrey Jennings, and Edward Upward. Building on substantial new archival research, Benjamin Kohlmann explores the deep tensions between modernist experimentation and political vision that lie at the heart of these works. Taking as its focus the work of these writers, the book argues that the close interactions between literary production, critical reflection, and political activism in the decade shaped the influential view of modernism as fundamentally apolitical. Intervening in debates about the long life of modernism, it contends that we need to take seriously the anti-modernist impulse of 1930s left-wing literature even when attention is paid to the formal complexity of these 'committed' works. The tonal ambiguities which run through the politicised literature of the 1930s thus effect not a disengagement from but a more thorough immersion in the profoundly conflicted political commitments of the decade. At the same time, the study shows that debates about the politics of writing in the 1930s continue to inform current debates about the relationship between literature and political commitment.
Biography & Autobiography

Nancy Cunard

Author: Lois G. Gordon

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 447

View: 613

Looks at the life of Nancy Cunard, a writer and activist who gave up a fantasy life to fight a lifelong battle against social injustice.
Art

Surrealist Collage in Text and Image

Author: Elza Adamowicz

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 248

View: 520

A new analysis of Surrealist collage in France, leading to a radical reassessment of Surrealism.
History

The French Navy and the Seven Years' War

Author: Jonathan R. Dull

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 445

View: 179

The Seven Years? War was the world?s first global conflict, spanning five continents and the critical sea lanes that connected them. This book is the fullest account ever written of the French navy?s role in the hostilities. It is also the most complete survey of both phases of the war: the French and Indian War in North America (1754?60) and the Seven Years? War in Europe (1756?63), which are almost always treated independently. By considering both phases of the war from every angle, award-winning historian Jonathan R. Dull shows not only that the two conflicts are so interconnected that neither can be fully understood in isolation but also that traditional interpretations of the war are largely inaccurate. His work also reveals how the French navy, supposedly utterly crushed, could have figured so prominently in the War of American Independence only fifteen years later. ø A comprehensive work integrating diplomatic, naval, military, and political history, The French Navy and the Seven Years? War thoroughly explores the French perspective on the Seven Years? War. It also studies British diplomacy and war strategy as well as the roles played by the American colonies, Spain, Austria, Prussia, Russia, Sweden, and Portugal. As this history unfolds, it becomes clear that French policy was more consistent, logical, and successful than has previously been acknowledged, and that King Louis XV?s conduct of the war profoundly affected the outcome of America?s subsequent Revolutionary War.
Literary Criticism

François Villon in His Works

Author: Michael Freeman

Publisher: Rodopi

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 269

View: 158

Despite the hundreds of books and scholarly articles which have been devoted to him, Francois Villon remains a mysterious figure who, in the words of the sort of paradox he applies to himself, appears both near yet far. Near because he seems to articulate feelings to which readers down the ages have been able to respond, far because the world he lived in seems to a modern reader a tantalizingly foreign one. No analysis of the poet's work is complete without some description of that world in all its physical and mental strangeness. This new book will also show how Villon consciously fashioned his own image, manipulating his original readers and offering them a version of himself and his talents designed to amuse, impress, move and perhaps deceive. For he had been a villain as well as a poet, and he uses selected episodes from his past together with a very personal treatment of the great literary and moral themes of his age not only to excuse his own conflicting emotions but also to demonstrate that he is a reformed man who needs and deserves sympathy and understanding. This consummate artist comes across in his deliberately ambiguous work as a loveable rogue, by turns jaunty and maudlin. The baffling persona he created raises many questions. The author of the present study looks in particular at the reception of Villon's work in his own day, suggesting that it was meant to be presented (and perhaps performed) as part of a process of rehabilitation and a return to the fold he had been forced to leave by his own behaviour. The poet's work might thus help him achieve social acceptance and the longed-for 'maison et couche molle'. However, events on the streets of Paris in late 1462 would silence his voice forever.
Art

Arts and Terror

Author: Vladimir L. Marchenkov

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 155

View: 320

This book examines the manifestations of terror in the arts. From classical tragedy to post-9/11 responses, terror – as an emotion, violent act, and state of the world – has been a preoccupation of artists in all genres. Using philosophy, art history, film studies, interdisciplinary arts, theatre studies, and musicology, the authors included here delve into this perennially contemporary theme to produce insights articulated in a variety of idioms: from traditional philosophical humanism to phenomenology to feminism. Their approaches may vary, but together they reinforce the notion that terror is a thread in the fabric of artistic expression as much as it has always been and, alas, remains a thread in the fabric of life.
Literary Criticism

Comparative Literature East and West

Author: Cornelia Niekus Moore

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 219

View: 120

This collection of papers inaugurates a new series which will present work from a two-year study at the U. of Hawaii. The research addresses commonalities and differences in topics and methodology, changing values, and the portrayal of the self in different cultures. No index. Annotation copyright B
Biography & Autobiography

Jean Cocteau

Author: Claude Arnaud

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 1014

View: 882

This passionate and monumental biography reassesses the life and legacy of one of the most significant cultural figures of the twentieth century Unevenly respected, easily hated, almost always suspected of being inferior to his reputation, Jean Cocteau has often been thought of as a jack-of-all-trades, master of none. In this landmark biography, Claude Arnaud thoroughly contests this characterization, as he celebrates Cocteau's "fragile genius--a combination almost unlivable in art" but in his case so fertile. Arnaud narrates the life of this legendary French novelist, poet, playwright, director, filmmaker, and designer who, as a young man, pretended to be a sort of a god, but who died as a humble and exhausted craftsman. His moving and compassionate account examines the nature of Cocteau's chameleon-like genius, his romantic attachments, his controversial politics, and his intimate involvement with many of the century's leading artistic lights, including Picasso, Proust, Hemingway, Stravinsky, and Tennessee Williams. Already published to great critical acclaim in France, Arnaud's penetrating and deeply researched work reveals a uniquely gifted artist while offering a magnificent cultural history of the twentieth century.