History

Medieval Outlaws

Author: Thomas H. Ohlgren

Publisher: Parlor Press LLC

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 487

View: 775

Description Billy the Kid, Jesse James, John Dillinger, and Al Capone were all are criminals who robbed and killed, yet they were considered good outlaws, celebrated in sensational newspapers, newsreels, and dime novels of the day, and later in film and television, for their daring, courage, loyalty, and even chivalry. Our fascination with criminal heroes has a long history, extending back to legendary accounts in medieval chronicle, romance, and ballad. Although their names may not be familiar-Earl Godwin, Hereward, Eustache the Monk, Fouke Fitz Waryn, n Bow-Bender, Gamelyn, Owain Glyndwr, William of Cloudesley, and William Wallace-these outlaws, in addition to Robin Hood, were all driven to lives of crime as victims of political intrigue or legal injustice. They committed capital crimes punishable by death, but, paradoxically, they were loved, encouraged, and supported by their communities. This revised and expanded edition of Medieval Outlaws gathers twelve outlaw tales, introduced and freshly translated into Modern English by a team of specialists, including Timothy S. Jones, Michael Swanton, Thomas E. Kelly, Mica Gould, Stephen Knight, Shaun F. D. Hughes, Alexander L. Kaufman, Thomas H. Ohlgren, Thomas Hahn, and Walter Scheps. The tales range in date from the Norman Conquest to the sixteenth century. Introductions precede each selection and notes identify all of the significant names, places, and historical events mentioned in the texts. Accessible and entertaining, these tales will be of interest to the general reader and student alike. About the Editor Thomas H. Ohlgren is Professor of English and Medieval Studies at Purdue University and is the author of numerous books and articles on medieval manuscripts and literature.
History

Outlaws in Medieval and Early Modern England

Author: John C. Appleby

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 196

View: 338

With some notable exceptions, the subject of outlawry in medieval and early-modern English history has attracted relatively little scholarly attention. This volume helps to address this significant gap in scholarship, and encourage further study of the subject, by presenting a series of new studies, based on original research, that address significant features of outlawry and criminality over an extensive period of time. The volume casts important light on, and raises provocative questions about, the definition, ambiguity, variety, causes, function, adaptability, impact and representation of outlawry during this period. It also helps to illuminate social and governmental attitudes and responses to outlawry and criminality, which involved the interests of both church and state. From different perspectives, the contributions to the volume address the complex relationships between outlaws, the societies in which they lived, the law and secular and ecclesiastical authorities, and, in doing so, reveal much about the strengths and limitations of the developing state in England. In terms of its breadth and the compelling interest of its subject matter, the volume will appeal to a wide audience of social, legal, political and cultural historians.
Literary Criticism

Medieval Outlaws

Author: Thomas H. Ohlgren

Publisher: Parlor Press LLC

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 524

View: 342

This revised and expanded edition of Medieval Outlaws gathers twelve outlaw tales, introduced and freshly translated into Modern English by a team of specialists. Accessible and entertaining, these tales will be of interest to the general reader and student alike.
Fiction

Medieval Outlaws

Author: Glynnis Campbell

Publisher: Glynnis Campbell

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 1050

View: 527

Spirited wenches and wayward rogues! From USA Today bestselling author Glynnis Campbell...Rogues, rapscallions, knaves, scoundrels, hellions, scallywags, blackguards, outcasts, and firebrands. They may be villains, but they’re irresistible, and sometimes the right woman (or man) can steal their hearts and help them mend their wicked ways. Book 1: DANGER'S KISS A beautiful thief can squirm out of trouble with a wink and a smile, until she meets the most feared lawman in the shire, who can't decide whether to kiss her or kill her. Book 2: PASSION'S EXILE A runaway bride fleeing to a convent is ambushed by a once-noble sword-for-hire who awakens her passions and destroys her best-laid plans. Book 3: DESIRE'S RANSOM A spirited Irish heiress joins a band of woodland outlaws and waylays the powerful Norman knight who's come to claim her as his bride, unaware he intends to steal her heart and take her as his prize. More Historical Romances by Glynnis Campbell The Warrior Maids of Rivenloch THE SHIPWRECK (a novella) A YULETIDE KISS (a short story) LADY DANGER CAPTIVE HEART KNIGHT'S PRIZE The Knights of de Ware THE HANDFASTING (a novella) MY CHAMPION MY WARRIOR MY HERO Medieval Outlaws THE REIVER (a novella) DANGER'S KISS PASSION'S EXILE DESIRE'S RANSOM Scottish Lasses THE OUTCAST (a novella) MacFARLAND'S LASS MacADAM'S LASS MacKENZIE'S LASS California Legends NATIVE GOLD NATIVE WOLF NATIVE HAWK
History

Outlaws in Medieval and Early Modern England

Author: Paul Dalton

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 184

View: 826

With some notable exceptions the subject of outlawry in medieval and early modern English history has attracted relatively little scholarly attention. This volume helps to address this significant gap in scholarship, and encourage further study of the subject, by presenting a series of innovative essays, based on original research and covering an extensive period of time. It focuses attention on the importance and diversity of people who crossed the boundary between legal and illegal activities and enterprise, but who have so far received uneven coverage from scholars. The essays have been specially commissioned by the editors from an experienced group of international scholars, giving the collection a strong inner coherence, enabling key themes to emerge clearly.
History

The Outlaws of Medieval Legend

Author: Maurice Keen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 923

Wonderfully written and beautifully presented , The Outlaws of Medieval Legend brings the popular heroes of the Middle-Ages to life. Featuring both famous - Robin Hood and William Wallace - and now forgotten rogues such as Gamelyn and Fulke Fitzwarin, this book explains the popularity of these semi-mythical figures, and how their stories appealed to the common people of the Middle Ages. Long unavailable, and now featuring a new introduction from the author, this is the perfect book for anyone with a fondness for medieval history and folklore.
History

Two Medieval Outlaws

Author: Glyn S. Burgess

Publisher: D. S. Brewer

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 212

View: 891

Fascinating insights into medieval life. THE TIMES LITERARY SUPPLEMENT
History

British Outlaws of Literature and History

Author: Alexander L. Kaufman

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 504

The medieval outlaws of Britain maintain a hold on the present-day imagination, judging by their presence in literature and on film. Exploring the nature of both historical and fictional outlaws, these twelve critical essays survey the literary, historical, and cultural environments that produced them, namely the medieval and early modern periods. Divided into three parts, the text examines the historical records of real outlawed men and women and the representation of Jews in medieval Britain as possible outlaws, outlaws associated specifically with Wales, and the popular figure of Robin Hood and the context of the late medieval poems and plays that feature him as a prominent figure.
History

Outlaws of Medieval Scotland

Author: Russell Andrew McDonald

Publisher: John Donald

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 202

View: 589

The history of the so-called Canmore kings in Scotland, from the reign of Malcolm lll (1058-93) down to that of Alexander lll (1249-86), is marked by an array of insurrections led by discontented dynasts and native warlords with grievances against these kings. Although none of the challenges ultimately proved successful, they nevertheless form a much-neglected theme across a formative era of Scottish history, which they in part define. This book demonstrates that the Canmore kings maintained their grip on power in large measure through crushing rivals and quashing numerous insurrections; their claim to be the founders of the medieval kingdom is valid, but the roles of violence and military confrontations in the consolidation of their power and the formation of the medieval kingdom are given new emphasis here.
Literary Criticism

The Ecology of the English Outlaw in Medieval Literature

Author: Sarah Harlan-Haughey

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 220

View: 951

Arguing that outlaw narratives become particularly popular and poignant at moments of national ecological and political crisis, Sarah Harlan-Haughey examines the figure of the outlaw in Anglo-Saxon poetry and Old English exile lyrics such as Beowulf, works dealing with the life and actions of Hereward, the Anglo-Norman romance of Fulk Fitz Waryn, the Robin Hood ballads, and the Tale of Gamelyn. Although the outlaw's wilderness shelter changed dramatically from the menacing fens and forests of Anglo-Saxon England to the bright, known, and mapped greenwood of the late outlaw romances and ballads, Harlan-Haughey observes that the outlaw remained strongly animalistic, other, and liminal. His brutality points to a deep literary ambivalence towards wilderness and the animal, at the same time that figures such as the Anglo-Saxon resistance fighter Hereward, the brutal yet courtly Gamelyn, and Robin Hood often represent a lost England imagined as pristine and forested. In analyzing outlaw literature as a form of nature writing, Harlan-Haughey suggests that it often reveals more about medieval anxieties respecting humanity's place in nature than it does about the political realities of the period.
History

The Role of Medieval Scottish Poetry in Creating Scottish Identity

Author: Stefan Thomas Hall

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 239

View: 700

This book studies medieval Scottish literature in light of theories on national identity, exploring how notions of ethnicity, language, class, kingship, history, folklore, and writing influence the ways Scots identify themselves. With chapters devoted to John Barbour's Bruce, Sir Richard Holland's Buke of the Howlat, and Blind Hary's Wallace, Scottish identity is seen as a textual construction, the product of medieval writers' tales of Scottish heroes such as Bruce, Douglas, and Wallace.
Literary Criticism

Outlawry in Medieval Literature

Author: T. Jones

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 221

View: 587

Drawing on new historical principles, this book examines literary and historical narratives, legal statutes and records, sermons, lyric poetry, and biblical exegesis circulating in medieval England in order to theorize the figure of the outlaw and uncover the legal, ethical, and social assumptions that underlie the practice of outlawry.
History

Storyworlds of Robin Hood

Author: Lesley Coote

Publisher: Reaktion Books

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 967

Robin Hood is one of the most enduring and well-known figures of English folklore. Yet who was he really? In this intriguing book, Lesley Coote reexamines the early tales about Robin in light of the stories, both English and French, that have grown up around them—stories with which they shared many elements of form and meaning. In the process, she returns to questions such as where did Robin come from, and what did these stories mean? The Robin who reveals himself is as spiritual as he is secular, and as much an insider as he is an outlaw. And in the context of current debates about national identity and Britain’s relationship with the wider world, Robin emerges to be as European as he is English—or perhaps, as Coote suggests, that is precisely the quality which made him fundamentally English all along.
Social Science

Outlaws and Highwaymen

Author: Gillian Spraggs

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 372

View: 959

The absorbing history of the robber in England—from the green woods of Sherwood Forest to the mean streets of Dickensian London.
LITERARY CRITICISM

Outlawry, Liminality, and Sanctity in the Literature of the Early Medieval North Atlantic

Author: Jeremy DeAngelo

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: LITERARY CRITICISM

Page:

View: 531

In reality, medieval outlaws were dangerous, desperate individuals. In the fiction of the Middle Ages, however, the possibilities afforded by their position on societies' margins granted them the ability to fill a number of transitory, transgressive roles: young adventurer, freedom fighter, and even saint. Outlawry, Liminality, and Sanctity in the Literature of the Early Medieval North Atlantic examines the development of the literary outlaw in the early Middle Ages, when traditions drawn from Anglo-Saxon England, early Christian Ireland, and Viking Age Iceland informed a generous view of itinerant criminality and facilitated the application of outlaw tropes to moral questions of conduct in both secular and religious life. Taken together, the traditions of the North Atlantic archipelago reveal a world of interconnected cultures with an expansive view of movement across boundaries both literal and conceptual, capable of finding value in unlikely places and countenancing the challenges presented by such discoveries. Bron: Flaptekst, uitgeversinformatie.
History

The Outlaws of Medieval Legend

Author: Maurice Hugh Keen

Publisher: Hippocrene Books

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 234

View: 658

The author explains the popularity of the semi-mythical outlaw/heroes of the Middle Ages: Robin Hood, Fulk Fitzwarin, William Wallace, Gamelyn and Eustace the Monk.
History

Bandit Territories

Author: Helen Phillips

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 283

View: 355

While everyone is familiar with the legend of Robin Hood, few can speak as knowledgably about other British outlaws and their traditions. Uncovering a popular history that dates back to Anglo-Saxon times, Bandit Territories takes as its main subject English, Welsh, and Scottish outlaws and considers their traditions in light of their unique landscapes, cultural histories, and adaptations into ballet, theatre, film and children's literature. Introducing figures such as Little John and William Wallace—the character portrayed by Mel Gibson in Braveheart—this volume explores the figure of the bandit, who lives between civil society and the wilderness, and offers an engaging portrait of his iconic masculinity and nationalist propaganda.