Social Science

Memory in a Global Age

Author: A. Assmann

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 252

View: 505

A significant contribution to memory studies and part of an emergent strand of work on global memory. This book offers important insights on topics relating to memory, globalization, international politics, international relations, Holocaust studies and media and communication studies.
History

The Holocaust and Memory in the Global Age

Author: Daniel Levy

Publisher: Temple University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 244

View: 274

Daniel Levy and Natan Sznaider examine the forms that collective memory take in the age of globalisation. They explore how the Holocaust has been remembered in Germany, Israel and the US over the past 50 years and demonstrate how this event has become detached from its precise context.
Social Science

Memory in a Global Age

Author: A. Assmann

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 252

View: 871

A significant contribution to memory studies and part of an emergent strand of work on global memory. This book offers important insights on topics relating to memory, globalization, international politics, international relations, Holocaust studies and media and communication studies.
History

Global Easts

Author: Jie-Hyun Lim

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 725

South Korean historian Jie-Hyun Lim, raised under an anticommunist dictatorship, turned to Marxian thought to explain his country’s development, even as he came to struggle with its Eurocentrism. As a transnational scholar working in postcommunist Poland, Lim recognized striking similarities between Korean and Polish history and politics. One realization stood out: Both Korea and Poland—at once the “West” for Asia yet “Eastern” Europe—had been assigned the role of “East.” This book explores entangled Easts to reconsider global history from the margins. Examining the politics of history and memory, Lim reveals the affinities linking Eastern Europe and East Asia. He draws out commonalities in their experiences of modernity, in their transitions from dictatorship to democracy, and in the shaping of collective memory. Ranging across Poland, Germany, Israel, Japan, and Korea, Lim traces the global history of how notions of victimhood have become central to nationalism. He criticizes mass dictatorships of right and left in the Global Easts, considering Nazi jurist Carl Schmitt’s notion of sovereign dictatorship and the concept of decisionist democracy. Lim argues that nationalism is inherently transnational, critiquing how the nationalist imagination of the Global East has influenced countries across borders. Theoretically sophisticated and conceptually innovative, this book sheds new light on the transnational complexity of historical memory and imagination, the boundaries between democracy and mass dictatorship, and the fluidity of East and West.
Literary Criticism

Transcultural Memory

Author: Rick Crownshaw

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 136

View: 547

Memories are not static or frozen, remaining in particular sites or places, within and belonging to particular groups, cultures or nations; rather, memory travels. Broadly speaking, memory has travelled because of the demographic displacements brought about by modernity’s extremes – slavery, colonialism, ethnic cleansing and genocide – and also because of the trade, travel and migration made possible by globalisation. Whether social movement is violent, exilic, migratory, emancipatory or oppressive, it is accompanied by memory. With the movement of people, memories of modernity’s histories and postmodern legacies meet, correspond and often become mutually constitutive. Even where memories compete with each other for cultural dominance, mutual dialogue and recognition is implicit if not explicit. Memories travel through and across cultures and national boundaries, a process increasingly facilitated by mass media technologies. This collection explores a range of case studies of transcultural memory as well as theorising the mobility of memory as it travels. It was originally published as a special issue of the journal parallax.
Literary Criticism

Crime Fiction and National Identities in the Global Age

Author: Julie H. Kim

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 270

View: 480

To read a crime novel today largely simulates the exercise of reading newspapers or watching the news. The speed and frequency with which today's bestselling works of crime fiction are produced allow them to mirror and dissect nearly contemporaneous socio-political events and conflicts. This collection examines this phenomenon and offers original, critical, essays on how national identity appears in international crime fiction in the age of populism and globalization. These essays address topics such as the array of competing nationalisms in Europe; Indian secularism versus Hindu communalism; the populist rhetoric tinged with misogyny or homophobia in the United States; racial, religious or ethnic others who are sidelined in political appeals to dominant native voices; and the increasing economic chasm between a rich and poor. More broadly, these essays inquire into themes such as how national identity and various conceptions of masculinity are woven together, how dominant native cultures interact with migrant and colonized cultures to explore insider/outsider paradigms and identity politics, and how generic and cultural boundaries are repeatedly crossed in postcolonial detective fiction.
History

Memory before Modernity

Author: Erika Kuijpers

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 895

This volume examines the practice of memory in early modern Europe, showing that this was already a multimedia affair with many political uses, and affecting people at all levels of society; many pre-modern memory practices persist until today.
Philosophy

Forgiveness in Perspective

Author: Christopher R. Allers

Publisher: Rodopi

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 206

View: 761

Amidst the cacophony of claims made about forgiveness, this book serves to aid in an effort to put "forgiveness in perspective." Marieke Smit and Christopher R. Allers have collected here ten essays written by twelve authors from around the world and across the disciplinary spectrum including philosophers, practitioners, psychologists, literary theorists, and prison chaplains. All the essays offer a perspective on forgiveness and put forgiveness in perspective whether by tracing what forgiveness "is," how this religious inheritence is worked out in our secularizing societies, how forgiveness works in our quotidian experience, or a particular manifestation in a particular context such as marriage, prison, or after an abortion, to name a few. The multi-disciplinary character of this book provides a multi-disciplinary appeal as well as a resource to enlarge one's own perspective on this perplexing, enigmatic, and wonderfully complex concept of forgiveness. Marieke Smit is a researcher at the Center for Prison Pastoral Care at the University of Tilburg. The Netherlands. Her research concerns the role of forgiveness in detention. She is also working as a prison chaplain in Dutch prisons. Christopher R. Allers (M.A., Institute for Christian Studies, Toronto) is Adjunct Professor of Philosophy at Cornerstone University (Grand Rapids, MI) and Sessional Instructer in Philosophy at the Institute for Christian Studies, Toronto (ICS) where he is also a doctoral student in the conjoint degree program between ICS and the Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam. He is currently working on a dissertation on forgiveness which is tentatively titled The Miracle of Forgiveness.
Literary Criticism

Memory and Complicity

Author: Debarati Sanyal

Publisher: Fordham University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 352

View: 229

Since World War II, French and Francophone literature and film have repeatedly sought not to singularize the Holocaust as the paradigm of historical trauma but rather to connect its memory with other memories of violence, namely that of colonialism. These works produced what Debarati Sanyal calls a “memory-in-complicity” attuned to the gray zones that implicate different regimes of violence across history as well as those of different subject positions such as victim, perpetrator, witness, and reader/spectator. Examining a range of works from Albert Camus, Primo Levi, Alain Resnais, and Jean-Paul Sartre to Jonathan Littell, Assia Djebar, Giorgio Agamben, and Boualem Sansal, Memory and Complicity develops an inquiry into the political force and ethical dangers of such implications, contrasting them with contemporary models for thinking about trauma and violence and offering an extended meditation on the role of aesthetic form, especially allegory, within acts of transhistorical remembrance. What are the political benefits and ethical risks of invoking the memory of one history in order to address another? What is the role of complicity in making these connections? How does complicity, rather than affect based discourses of trauma, shame and melancholy, open a critical engagement with the violence of history? What is it about literature and film that have made them such powerful vehicles for this kind of connective memory work? As it offers new readings of some of the most celebrated and controversial novelists, filmmakers, and playwrights from the French-speaking world, Memory and Complicity addresses these questions in order to reframe the way we think about historical memory and its political uses today.
Social Science

Death in a Global Age

Author: Ruth McManus

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 280

View: 597

Attitudes towards death are shaped by our social worlds. This book explores how beliefs, practices and representations of dying and death continue to evolve and adapt in response to changing global societies. Introducing students to debates around grief, religion and life expectancy, this is a clear guide to a complex field for all sociologists.