Business & Economics

Money, Trade and Economic Growth (Collected Works of Harry Johnson)

Author: Harry G. Johnson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 200

View: 480

This book deals with the effects of international trade on economic growth and money. It also re-examines Keynesian theory and analyzes economic growth in an affluent society in terms of planning, economic and social policy.

Money

Author: Harry G. Johnson

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 199

View: 150

Business & Economics

Ricardo's Macroeconomics

Author: Timothy S. Davis

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 316

View: 203

This book describes the contribution of David Ricardo to the development of macroeconomics.
Business & Economics

Canadian Quandary

Author: Harry Johnson

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 424

View: 712

The Canadian Quandary is a collection of unbuttoned pieces written in Johnson's witty and acerbic style between 1958 and 1963. Dealing with Canadian policy on trade and foreign policy, the volume includes Johnson's classic dismemberment of the Canadian nationalist movement. Though Trudeau's Foreign Investment Review Agency and National Energy Policy have long since been dismantled, economic nationalism persists and it is a testament to both the lucidity of Johnson's mind and the vigour and clarity of his writing that many of his opinions on this debate are still fresh, interesting, and relevant.
Business & Economics

Money, Trade, and Competition

Author: Herbert Giersch

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 304

View: 593

On June 1, 1990, Egon Sohmen would have reached the age of 60 had he not suffered from a fatal illness. It demanded his death at the early age of 46. If he were still with us, he would playa prominent role in the current debate on monetary arrangements and on allocation theory, perhaps in cluding environmental issues and urban economics. His contributions are well remembered by his colleagues and friends, by his former students, and by many in the economics profession on both sides of the Atlantic. In extrapolating his great achievements as a scholar and teacher beyond the time of his death, one is inclined to suppose that Egon Sohmen's name would figure high on many a list of candidates for honors and awards in the field of international economics. For the reconstruction of economics in the German language area Egon Sohmen was invaluable. Born in Linz (Austria), he studied in Vienna at the Business School (Hochschule fUr Welthandel, now Wirtscha!tsuniversitiit), then went to the US as a Fulbright scholar (1953), returned to Europe to take his doctorate in Tiibingen, Germany, (1954) and crossed the Atlantic again to teach at MIT (1955-58) where he obtained a Ph. D. (1958) under Charlie Kindleberger. He might have stayed permanently in the US, con tinuing a career that he started as Assistant Professor at Yale University (1958-61), if the US visa provisions had been applied in a more liberal fashion.