Literary Criticism

Native Literature in Canada

Author: Penny Petrone

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 213

View: 671

This first critical study of the literature of Indian and Metis peoples in Canada includes the oral tradition, orations, sermons, petitions, letters, journals, autobiographies, historical and travel writings, short stories, novels, poetry, drama, traditional tales and essays from the seventeenth century to the present.
Canadian literature

An Anthology of Canadian Native Literature in English

Author: Daniel David Moses

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Canadian literature

Page: 578

View: 434

This volume is a wide-ranging survey of writing in English by Canadian Native authors. Beginning with traditional songs and works by early Native writers such as Joseph Brant and John Brant-Sero, George Copway and Pauline Johnson, the anthology turns to a selection of short stories, plays,poems, and essays by contemporary writers drawn from a wide range of peoples and nations across Canada. The editors have also attempted to showcase a diversity of opinions, voices, and styles.
Literary Criticism

Introduction to Indigenous Literary Criticism in Canada

Author: Heather Macfarlane

Publisher: Broadview Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 344

View: 379

Introduction to Indigenous Literary Criticism in Canada collects 26 seminal critical essays indispensable to our understanding of the rapidly growing field of Indigenous literatures. The texts gathered in this collection, selected after extensive consultation with experts in the field, trace the development of Indigenous literatures while highlighting major trends and themes, including appropriation, stereotyping, language, land, spirituality, orality, colonialism, residential schools, reconciliation, gender, resistance, and ethical scholarship.
Social Science

Creating Community

Author: Renate Eigenbrod

Publisher: Penticton, B.C. : Theytus Books

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 297

View: 572

Creating Community is a special book about imagination and challenge. We know that writers try to tell us things. We know that what they tell is culturally-based. But what exactly are Aboriginal authors trying to tell us? Fifteen authors and scholars discuss Aboriginal literature in it's unique Canadian context
Literary Collections

Native Writers and Canadian Writing

Author: W. H. New

Publisher: UBC Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 306

View: 553

Native Writers and Canadian Writing is a co-publication with Canadian Literature -- Canada's foremost literary journal -- of a special double issue which focuses on literature by and about Canada's Native peoples and contains original articles and poems by both Native and non-Native writers. These not only reflect the growing prominence of contemporary Native writing but also direct the reader to the traditional literature from which it springs and which has been largely misunderstood by the non- Native community -- myths, rituals, and songs having been interpreted more often as artistic "curiosities" rather than the masterworks of a different culture. Essays examining the conventional portrayals of Native people in literature touch on works which range from the eighteenth-century journals of explorer Alexander Mackenzie, to the novels of James Fenimore Cooper, and to early writers in Canada such as historian-humourist Thomas Chandler Haliburton.
Literary Criticism

History of Literature in Canada

Author: Reingard M. Nischik

Publisher: Camden House

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 605

View: 401

The development of literature in Canada with an eye to its multicultural, multiethnic, multilingual nature.
Literary Criticism

Across Cultures / Across Borders

Author: Paul Depasquale

Publisher: Broadview Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 320

View: 980

Across Cultures/Across Borders is a collection of new critical essays, interviews, and other writings by twenty-five established and emerging Canadian Aboriginal and Native American scholars and creative writers across Turtle Island. Together, these original works illustrate diverse but interconnecting knowledges and offer powerfully relevant observations on Native literature and culture.
Literary Criticism

A History of Canadian Literature

Author: W. H. New

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 464

View: 478

"New offers an unconventionally structured overview of Canadian literature, from Native American mythologies to contemporary texts." Publishers Weekly A History of Canadian Literature looks at the work of writers and the social and cultural contexts that helped shape their preoccupations and direct their choice of literary form. W.H. New explains how – from early records of oral tales to the writing strategies of the early twenty-first century – writer, reader, literature, and society are interrelated. New discusses both Aboriginal and European mythologies, looking at pre-Contact narratives and also at the way Contact experience altered hierarchies of literary value. He then considers representations of the "real," whether in documentary, fantasy, or satire; historical romance and the social construction of Nature and State; and ironic subversions of power, the politics of cultural form, and the relevance of the media to a representation of community standard and individual voice. New suggests some ways in which writers of the later twentieth century codified such issues as history, gender, ethnicity, and literary technique itself. In this second edition, he adds a lengthy chapter that considers how writers at the turn of the twenty-first century have reimagined their society and their roles within it, and an expanded chronology and bibliography. Some of these writers have spoken from and about various social margins (dealing with issues of race, status, ethnicity, and sexuality), some have sought emotional understanding through strategies of history and memory, some have addressed environmental concerns, and some have reconstructed the world by writing across genres and across different media. All genres are represented, with examples chosen primarily, but not exclusively, from anglophone and francophone texts. A chronology, plates, and a series of tables supplement the commentary.
Literary Criticism

Transatlantic Upper Canada

Author: Kevin Hutchings

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 288

View: 652

Literature emerging from nineteenth-century Upper Canada, born of dramatic cultural and political collisions, reveals much about the colony's history through its contrasting understandings of nature, ecology, deforestation, agricultural development, and land rights. In the first detailed study of literary interactions between Indigenous people and colonial authorities in Upper Canada and Britain, Kevin Hutchings analyzes the period's key figures and the central role that romanticism, ecology, and environment played in their writings. Investigating the ties that bound Upper Canada and Great Britain together during the early nineteenth century, Transatlantic Upper Canada demonstrates the existence of a cosmopolitan culture whose implications for the land and its people are still felt today. The book examines the writings of Haudenosaunee leaders John Norton and John Brant and Anishinabeg authors Jane Johnston Schoolcraft, Peter Jones, and George Copway, as well as European figures John Beverley Robinson, John Strachan, Anna Brownell Jameson, and Sir Francis Bond Head. Hutchings argues that, despite their cultural differences, many factors connected these writers, including shared literary interests, cross-Atlantic journeys, metropolitan experiences, mutual acquaintance, and engagement in ongoing dialogue over Indigenous territory and governance. A close examination of relationships between peoples and their understandings of land, Transatlantic Upper Canada creates a rich portrait of the nineteenth-century British Atlantic world and the cultural and environmental consequences of colonialism and resistance.
Literary Criticism

Native Writers and Canadian Writing

Author: William H. New

Publisher: UBC Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 306

View: 249

Additional keywords : Aboriginal or Native peoples, First Nations, poems.
Literary Criticism

The Oxford Handbook of Canadian Literature

Author: Cynthia Sugars

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 800

View: 805

The Oxford Handbook of Canadian Literature provides a broad-ranging introduction to some of the key critical fields, genres, and periods in Canadian literary studies. The essays in this volume, written by prominent theorists in the field, reflect the plurality of critical perspectives, regional and historical specializations, and theoretical positions that constitute the field of Canadian literary criticism across a range of genres and historical periods. The volume provides a dynamic introduction to current areas of critical interest, including (1) attention to the links between the literary and the public sphere, encompassing such topics as neoliberalism, trauma and memory, citizenship, material culture, literary prizes, disability studies, literature and history, digital cultures, globalization studies, and environmentalism or ecocriticism; (2) interest in Indigenous literatures and settler-Indigenous relations; (3) attention to multiple diasporic and postcolonial contexts within Canada; (4) interest in the institutionalization of Canadian literature as a discipline; (5) a turn towards book history and literary history, with a renewed interest in early Canadian literature; (6) a growing interest in articulating the affective character of the "literary" - including an interest in affect theory, mourning, melancholy, haunting, memory, and autobiography. The book represents a diverse array of interests -- from the revival of early Canadian writing, to the continued interest in Indigenous, regional, and diasporic traditions, to more recent discussions of globalization, market forces, and neoliberalism. It includes a distinct section dedicated to Indigenous literatures and traditions, as well as a section that reflects on the discipline of Canadian literature as a whole.
Literary Criticism

Indigenous Poetics in Canada

Author: Neal McLeod

Publisher: Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 416

View: 884

Indigenous Poetics in Canada broadens the way in which Indigenous poetry is examined, studied, and discussed in Canada. Breaking from the parameters of traditional English literature studies, this volume embraces a wider sense of poetics, including Indigenous oralities, languages, and understandings of place. Featuring work by academics and poets, the book examines four elements of Indigenous poetics. First, it explores the poetics of memory: collective memory, the persistence of Indigenous poetic consciousness, and the relationships that enable the Indigenous storytelling process. The book then explores the poetics of performance: Indigenous poetics exist both in written form and in relation to an audience. Third, in an examination of the poetics of place and space, the book considers contemporary Indigenous poetry and classical Indigenous narratives. Finally, in a section on the poetics of medicine, contributors articulate the healing and restorative power of Indigenous poetry and narratives.
Literary Criticism

The Cambridge Companion to Canadian Literature

Author: Eva-Marie Kröller

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 553

This fully revised second edition of The Cambridge Companion to Canadian Literature offers a comprehensive introduction to major writers, genres and topics. For this edition several chapters have been completely rewritten to reflect major developments in Canadian literature since 2004. Surveys of fiction, drama and poetry are complemented by chapters on Aboriginal writing, autobiography, literary criticism, writing by women and the emergence of urban writing. Areas of research that have expanded since the first edition include environmental concerns and questions of sexuality which are freshly explored across several different chapters. A substantial chapter on francophone writing is included. Authors such as Margaret Atwood, noted for her experiments in multiple literary genres, are given full consideration, as is the work of authors who have achieved major recognition, such as Alice Munro, recipient of the Nobel Prize for literature.
Literary Criticism

Contemporary Challenges

Author: Hartmut Lutz

Publisher: Saskatoon : Fifth House

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 276

View: 736

Conversations with eighteen Native writers including their thoughts and concerns about writing, the influence of the oral tradition, what makes them write, the relationship between Native writers and (non-Native) critics, their views of spirituality, the question of "appropriation" of Native stories, the problems of overcoming barriers to understanding and perception between Natives and non-Natives, and the larger questions of how human beings relate to the Earth. Authors interviewed: Jeannette Armstrong, Beth Cuthand, Maria Campbell, Jordan Wheeler, Lenore Keeshig-Tobias, Tomson Highway, Beatrice Culleton, Thomas King, Greg Young-Ing, Anne Acco, Howard Adams, Daniel David Moses, Lee Maracle, Emma LaRocque, Ruby Slipperjack, Joy Asham Fedorick, Basil Johnston, and Rita Joe.
Literary Criticism

The Cambridge Companion to Canadian Literature

Author: Eva-Marie Kröller

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 292

View: 145

A comprehensive and lively introduction to Canadian literature, its major genres, themes and preoccupations.
Literary Criticism

Handbook of Native American Literature

Author: Andrew Wiget

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 616

View: 225

The Handbook of Native American Literature is a unique, comprehensive, and authoritative guide to the oral and written literatures of Native Americans. It lays the perfect foundation for understanding the works of Native American writers. Divided into three major sections, Native American Oral Literatures, The Historical Emergence of Native American Writing, and A Native American Renaissance: 1967 to the Present, it includes 22 lengthy essays, written by scholars of the Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures. The book features reports on the oral traditions of various tribes and topics such as the relation of the Bible, dreams, oratory, humor, autobiography, and federal land policies to Native American literature. Eight additional essays cover teaching Native American literature, new fiction, new theater, and other important topics, and there are bio-critical essays on more than 40 writers ranging from William Apes (who in the early 19th century denounced white society's treatment of his people) to contemporary poet Ray Young Bear. Packed with information that was once scattered and scarce, the Handbook of Native American Literature -a valuable one-volume resource-is sure to appeal to everyone interested in Native American history, culture, and literature. Previously published in cloth as The Dictionary of Native American Literature
Literary Collections

Indigenizing the Classroom

Author: Anna M. Brígido Corachán

Publisher: Universitat de València

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 204

View: 832

In the past four decades Native American/First Nations Literature has emerged as a literary and academic field and it is now read, taught, and theorized in many educational settings outside the United States and Canada. Native American and First Nations authors have also broadened their themes and readership by exploring transnational contexts and foreign realities, and through translation into major and minor languages, thus establishing creative networks with other literary communities around the world. However, when their texts are taught abroad, the perpetuation of Indian stereotypes, mystifications, and misconceptions is still a major issue that non-Native readers, students, and teachers continue to struggle with. To counter such distorted representations and neo/colonialist readings, this book presents a strategic selection of critical case studies that set specific texts within cross-cultural contexts wherein Native-based methodologies and key concepts are placed at the center of the reading practice. The challenging role of teachers and researchers as potential intermediaries and responsible disseminators of what Gayatri C. Spivak calls “transnational literacy” as well as the reception of Native North American works, contexts, and themes by international readers thus becomes a primary focus of attention. This volume provides a set of critical analyses and practical resources that may enable teachers outside the United States and Canada to incorporate Native American/First Nations literature and related cultural and historical texts into their teaching practices and current research interests in a creative, decolonizing, and responsible manner.
Literary Criticism

The Oxford Handbook of Indigenous American Literature

Author: James H. Cox

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 704

View: 794

Over the course of the last twenty years, Native American and Indigenous American literary studies has experienced a dramatic shift from a critical focus on identity and authenticity to the intellectual, cultural, political, historical, and tribal nation contexts from which these Indigenous literatures emerge. The Oxford Handbook of Indigenous American Literature reflects on these changes and provides a complete overview of the current state of the field. The Handbook's forty-three essays, organized into four sections, cover oral traditions, poetry, drama, non-fiction, fiction, and other forms of Indigenous American writing from the seventeenth through the twenty-first century. Part I attends to literary histories across a range of communities, providing, for example, analyses of Inuit, Chicana/o, Anishinaabe, and Métis literary practices. Part II draws on earlier disciplinary and historical contexts to focus on specific genres, as authors discuss Indigenous non-fiction, emergent trans-Indigenous autobiography, Mexicanoh and Spanish poetry, Native drama in the U.S. and Canada, and even a new Indigenous children's literature canon. The third section delves into contemporary modes of critical inquiry to expound on politics of place, comparative Indigenism, trans-Indigenism, Native rhetoric, and the power of Indigenous writing to communities of readers. A final section thoroughly explores the geographical breadth and expanded definition of Indigenous American through detailed accounts of literature from Indian Territory, the Red Atlantic, the far North, Yucatán, Amerika Samoa, and Francophone Quebec. Together, the volume is the most comprehensive and expansive critical handbook of Indigenous American literatures published to date. It is the first to fully take into account the last twenty years of recovery and scholarship, and the first to most significantly address the diverse range of texts, secondary archives, writing traditions, literary histories, geographic and political contexts, and critical discourses in the field.