Navajo language

Navajo-English Dictionary

Author: C. Leon Wall

Publisher: [Phoenix, Ariz.] : United States Department of the Interior, Division of Education, Bureau of Indian Affairs

ISBN:

Category: Navajo language

Page: 65

View: 492

In response to a recent surge of interest in Native American history, culture, and lore, Hippocrene brings you a concise and straightforward dictionary of the Navajo tongue. The dictionary is designed to aid Navajos learning English as well as English speakers interested in acquiring knowledge of Navajo. The largest of all the Native American tribes, the Navajo number about 125,000 and live mostly on reservations in Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah. Over 9,000 entries; A detailed section on Navajo pronunciation; A comprehensive, modern vocabulary; Useful, everyday expressions.
Language Arts & Disciplines

Navajo/English Dictionary of Verbs

Author: Alyse Neundorf

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 313

View: 858

Navajo/English Dictionary of Verbs lists 350 Navajo verbs in paradigm form, conjugated for the Imperfective, Perfective, and Future modes.
Foreign Language Study

A Navajo/English Bilingual Dictionary

Author: Alyse Neundorf

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN:

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 865

View: 723

Intended primarily for Navajo children learning to read and write the language in bilingual classrooms. this picture dictionary presents over 1,500 noun and 330 verb entries, all selected because they are words used in and around the school.
Navajo language

Navajo-English Dictionary

Author: United States. Indian Affairs Bureau

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Navajo language

Page: 65

View: 212

Language Arts & Disciplines

The Navajo Language

Author: Robert W. Young

Publisher: Createspace Independent Pub

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 508

View: 338

This book is a source of vocabulary and grammatical information that is indespensable for teachers and students of the Navajo language. Beginning with an explanation of the Navajo sound system, the publication is followed by a 125 page long outline of Navajo grammar. The work presented is also composed of a two part dictionary: 247 pages Navajo – English and 101 pages English – Navajo. Young and Morgan have used painstaking care in gathering, arranging and describing the numberless complex details of Navajo language. Originally published in 1943, it was supplemented with 'The Vocabulary of Colloquial Navajo' in 1950, using a wealth of sentence examples for each verb entry. Both publications are now once more made available by Native Child Dinétah.
Navajo language

Saad Ahąąh Sinil

Author: Martha Austin

Publisher: Navajo Curriculum Center

ISBN:

Category: Navajo language

Page: 41

View: 736

Lists alphabetically Navajo words and their English counterparts, under such categorties as clothing, plants, food, colors, and parts of the body.
Navajo language

Áłchíní Bi Naaltsoostsoh

Author: Alyse Neundorf

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Navajo language

Page: 865

View: 512

A Navajo-English picture dictionary, with bilingual text and extensive verb entries to demonstrate conjugation, developed for students learning to read and write Navajo.
Reference

The English-Navajo Children's Picture Dictionary

Author: Roman De Los Santos

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 326

View: 918

The English-Navajo Children's Picture Dictionary is an English language children's dictionary with Navajo translations. by using these translations, and also the accompanying English sentence employing the entry word and the pictures, Navajo-speaking students should be able to get a better understanding of each entry word's meaning. the book will also be helpful to those students who are learning to read Navajo, and to those who are learning the Navajo language.
English language

An Illustrated Dictionary of Navajo Landscape Terms

Author: David M. Mark

Publisher: Peter Lang Incorporated, International Academic Publishers

ISBN:

Category: English language

Page: 98

View: 941

The Navajo language (Diné bizaad) has a vocabulary of landscape terms that allows speakers to communicate about their environment. This book documents that vocabulary and provides photographic illustration of many of the terms. The meanings of these terms seldom match the English-language terms one-to-one. Terms include explicit reference to earth materials such as water or rock/stone. Rather than alphabetically, this book is organized by material and form categories. This dictionary is a valuable resource for language preservation in schools and elsewhere, and for linguists, anthropologists, geographers, and earth scientists interested in indigenous conceptualization of landscape and environment.
Foreign Language Study

Barron's German-English Dictionary

Author: Ursula Martini

Publisher: PONS

ISBN:

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 1254

View: 951

"100,000 words, phrases & examples presented in two sections: American-style English to German, German to English" -- Front cover.
Language Arts & Disciplines

The Navajo Sound System

Author: J.M. McDonough

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 212

View: 732

The Navajo language is spoken by the Navajo people who live in the Navajo Nation, located in Arizona and New Mexico in the southwestern United States. The Navajo language belongs to the Southern, or Apachean, branch of the Athabaskan language family. Athabaskan languages are closely related by their shared morphological structure; these languages have a productive and extensive inflectional morphology. The Northern Athabaskan languages are primarily spoken by people indigenous to the sub-artic stretches of North America. Related Apachean languages are the Athabaskan languages of the Southwest: Chiricahua, Jicarilla, White Mountain and Mescalero Apache. While many other languages, like English, have benefited from decades of research on their sound and speech systems, instrumental analyses of indigenous languages are relatively rare. There is a great deal ofwork to do before a chapter on the acoustics of Navajo comparable to the standard acoustic description of English can be produced. The kind of detailed phonetic description required, for instance, to synthesize natural sounding speech, or to provide a background for clinical studies in a language is well beyond the scope of a single study, but it is necessary to begin this greater work with a fundamental description of the sounds and supra-segmental structure of the language. Inkeeping with this, the goal of this project is to provide a baseline description of the phonetic structure of Navajo, as it is spoken on the Navajo reservation today, to provide a foundation for further work on the language.

Author: Shannon Graff Hysell

Publisher: Libraries Unlimited

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 704

View: 417

For the past three decades, ARBA has kept librarians up to date on the latest reference materials by providing high-quality, critical reviews. The 2007 edition of ARBA continues this great tradition by providing users with access to 1,600-plus reviews of both print and online resources, written by more than 400 academic, public, and school librarians who are experts in their field. With coverage of nearly 500 subject disciplines, ranging from the social sciences and humanities to science and technology, users are guaranteed to find information on the latest resources available in the areas they are most trying to expand their collection. With ARBA in hand, collection development librarians can manage their library's high standards of quality, and make the best use of their budget.