Antiques & Collectibles

Navajo Weaving Today

Author: Nancy Schiffer

Publisher: Schiffer Pub Limited

ISBN:

Category: Antiques & Collectibles

Page: 64

View: 528

The traditional regional styles long associated with Navajo blankets and rugs continue to evolve. Here contemporary weavings are shown in color, with text identifying many of today's weavers. The new styles of Burntwater, Wide Ruins, Ganado, Crystal, Chinle, Two Grey Hills, Teec Nos Pos, Western Reservation and Shiprock area designs show the continuing talent among today's Navajo weavers.
Hand weaving

Navajo Weaving Today

Author: Bertha Pauline Dutton

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Hand weaving

Page: 42

View: 821

Examines Navajo weaving styles from different regions of Arizona and New Mexico.
Design

Spider Woman's Children

Author: Barbara Teller Ornelas

Publisher: Thrums, LLC

ISBN:

Category: Design

Page: 144

View: 409

Navajo rugs set the gold standard for handwoven textiles in the U.S. Their history and value to collectors is unparalleled. But what about the people who create these treasures? You might be surprised. Spider Woman's Children is the inside story, told by two women who are both deeply embedded in their own culture, and considered among the very most skillful and artistic of Navajo weavers today. Barbara Teller Ornelas and Lynda Teller Pete are fifth-generation weavers who grew up at the fabled Two Grey Hills trading post. Their family and clan connections give them rare insight into where the craft has been and where it is going. They take you into traditional hogans, remote trading posts, reservation housing neighborhoods, and urban apartments to meet weavers who follow the paths of their ancestors, who innovate with new designs and techniques, and who uphold time-honored standards of excellence. You'll meet men who learned to weave from their grandmothers; women who weave alongside their aging moms; a young woman who incorporates contemporary images into skillful, highly collectible tapestries. You'll walk with elderly women over their sheep pastures and cornfields in search of natural dyestuffs. You'll see how well made, simple weaving tools from generations past take a place of pride in every home. And throughout, you'll see examples of the finest, most mindful weaving this rich tradition has to offer
Art

Navajo Weaving in the Late Twentieth Century

Author: Ann Lane Hedlund

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 143

View: 623

According to the Navajos, the holy people Spider Man and Spider Woman first brought the tools for weaving to the People. Over the centuries Navajo artists have used those tools to weave a web of beautyÑa rich tradition that continues to the present day. In testimony to this living art form, this book presents 74 dazzling color plates of Navajo rugs and wall hangings woven between 1971 and 1996. Drawn from a private southwestern collection, they represent the work of sixty of the finest native weavers in the American Southwest. The creations depicted here reflect a number of stylesÑrevival, sandpainting, pictorial, miniature, samplerÑand a number of major regional variations, from Ganado to Teec Nos Pos. Textile authority Ann Hedlund provides an introductory narrative about the development of Navajo textile collectingÑincluding the shift of attention from artifacts to artÑand a brief review of the history of Navajo weaving. She then comments on the shaping of the particular collection represented in the book, offering a rich source of knowledge and insight for other collectors. Explaining themes in Navajo weaving over the quarter-century represented by the Santa Fe Collection, Hedlund focuses on the development of modern rug designs and the influence on weavers of family, community, artistic identity, and the marketplace. She also introduces each section of plates with a description of the representative style, its significance, and the weavers who perpetuate and deviate from it. In addition to the textile plates, Hedlund's color photographs show the families, landscapes, livestock, hogans, and looms that surround today's Navajo weavers. Navajo Weaving in the Late Twentieth Century explores many of the important connections that exist today among weavers through their families and neighbors, and the significant role that collectors play in perpetuating this dynamic art form. For all who appreciate American Indian art and culture, this book provides invaluable guidance to the fine points of collecting and a rich visual feast.
Crafts & Hobbies

Navajo Weaving Way

Author: Noel Bennett

Publisher: Interweave

ISBN:

Category: Crafts & Hobbies

Page: 160

View: 378

Provides information for building looms and warp frames, and includes directions and patterns for weaving Navojo rugs
Crafts & Hobbies

Spider Woman

Author: Gladys Amanda Reichard

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN:

Category: Crafts & Hobbies

Page: 287

View: 845

This lively account of a pioneering anthropologist's experiences with a Navajo family grew out of the author's desire to learn to weave as a way of participating in Navajo culture rather than observing it from the outside. In 1930, when Gladys Reichard came to stay with the family of Red-Point, a well-known Navajo singer, it was unusual for an anthropologist to live with a family and become intimately connected with women's activities. First published in 1934 for a popular audience, Spider Woman is valued today not just for its information on Navajo culture but as an early example of the kind of personal, honest ethnography that presents actual experiences and conversations rather than generalizing the beliefs and behaviors of a whole culture. Readers interested in Navajo weaving will find it especially useful, but Spider Woman's picture of daily life goes far beyond rugs to describe trips to the trading post, tribal council meetings, curing ceremonies, and the deaths of family members.
Art

Patterns of Exchange

Author: Teresa J. Wilkins

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 248

View: 184

The Navajo rugs and textiles that people admire and buy today are the result of many historical influences, particularly the interaction between Navajo weavers and the traders who guided their production and controlled their sale. John Lorenzo Hubbell and other late-nineteenth-century traders were convinced they knew which patterns and colors would appeal to Anglo-American buyers, and so they heavily encouraged those designs. In Patterns of Exchange, Teresa J. Wilkins traces how the relationships between generations of Navajo weavers and traders affected Navajo weaving. The Navajos valued their relationships with Hubbell and others who operated trading posts on their reservation. As a result, they did not always see themselves as exploited victims of a capitalist system. Rather, because of Navajo cultural traditions of gift-giving and helping others, the artists slowly adapted some of the patterns and colors the traders requested into their own designs. By the 1890s, Hubbell and others commissioned paintings depicting particular weaving styles and encouraged Navajo weavers to copy them, reinforcing public perceptions of traditional Navajo weaving. Even the Navajos came to revere certain designs as “the weaving of the ancestors.” Enhanced by numerous illustrations, including eight color plates, this volume traces the intricate play of cultural and economic pressures and personal relationships between artists and traders that guided Navajo weavers to produce textiles that are today emblems of the Native American Southwest. Winner - Multi-cultural Subject, New Mexico Book Awards
Crafts & Hobbies

Ray Manley's The Fine Art of Navajo Weaving

Author: Steve Getzwiller

Publisher: Ray Manley Pub

ISBN:

Category: Crafts & Hobbies

Page: 48

View: 720

Full-color photographs accompanied by descriptions of styles, locations and histories of Navajo rugs.
Design

A Guide to Navajo Rugs

Author: Susan Lamb

Publisher: Western National Parks Association

ISBN:

Category: Design

Page: 42

View: 737

Describes and depicts the seventeen most common Navajo rug styles, and includes quotes by some of the finest weavers crafting rugs today. Photos of rugs from Hubbell Trading Post National Historic Site by George H. H. Huey.
Crafts & Hobbies

Rugs and Posts

Author: H. L. James

Publisher: Schiffer Pub Limited

ISBN:

Category: Crafts & Hobbies

Page: 120

View: 430

Schiffer Publishing is pleased to bring out this entirely new edition of H.L. James' classic study of the Navajo rug and the trading posts associated with each unique style. New information and an entirely different design help explain and display the beauty and craft of the Navajo Indians. Illustrated with 106 color images, many black-and-white photographs and drawings, and up-to-date price information, Post and Rugs traces the history of the Navajo rug and the impact the trading posts have had on its regionalization. There is also much background material on the Navajo people and their art. Here are design drawings showing elements characteristic of different weaving centers, superb color photographs of rugs typical of these centers, and detailed maps to the areas. Exquisite line drawings accompany the text showing all the steps in rug weaving, from the sheep to the finished rug. Also there is helpful advice on buying Navajo rugs and caring for them.
Juvenile Nonfiction

Songs from the Loom

Author:

Publisher: Lerner Publications

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 48

View: 310

Describes the cultural meaning of Navajo weaving
Hand weaving.

Designing with the Wool

Author: Noël Bennett

Publisher: Northland Pub

ISBN:

Category: Hand weaving.

Page: 118

View: 849

A step-by-step manual that illustrates techniques for constructing looms and other weaving tools and making Navajo rug designs.
Indian textile fabrics

H.L. James's Rugs and Posts

Author: Harold L. James

Publisher: Schiffer Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Indian textile fabrics

Page: 120

View: 378

Looks at the history of the Navajo and their rugs, describes how the rugs are made, and discusses the influence of trading posts.
Crafts & Hobbies

Navajo and Hopi Weaving Techniques

Author: Mary Pendleton

Publisher: Book Sales

ISBN:

Category: Crafts & Hobbies

Page: 158

View: 271

Provides instructions for building looms and warp frames in addition to directions for weaving Hopi ceremonial belts and Navajo rugs. Bibliogs
Crafts & Hobbies

Weaving a Navajo Blanket

Author: Gladys A. Reichard

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Crafts & Hobbies

Page: 256

View: 522

This guide was written by a noted ethnologist who learned the principles of weaving directly from Navajo artisans. She shares their materials and methods, commenting on history, patterns, symbolism, more. 97 illustrations.
Antiques & Collectibles

Weaving a World

Author: Roseann Sandoval Willink

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Antiques & Collectibles

Page: 96

View: 512

Explores weaving as conceptual art
History

Navajo Textiles

Author: Laurie D. Webster

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 666

Navajo Textiles provides a nuanced account the Navajo weavings in the Crane Collection at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science—one of the largest collections of Navajo textiles in the world. Bringing together the work of anthropologists and indigenous artists, the book explores the Navajo rug trade in the mid-nineteenth century and changes in the Navajo textile market while highlighting the museum’s important, though still relatively unknown, collection of Navajo textiles. In this unique collaboration among anthropologists, museums, and Navajo weavers, the authors provide a narrative of the acquisition of the Crane Collection and a history of Navajo weaving. Personal reflections and insights from foremost Navajo weavers D. Y. Begay and Lynda Teller Pete are also featured, and more than one hundred stunning full-color photographs of the textiles in the collection are accompanied by technical information about the materials and techniques used in their creation. An introduction by Ann Lane Hedlund documents the growing collaboration between Navajo weavers and museums in Navajo textile research. The legacy of Navajo weaving is complex and intertwined with the history of the Diné themselves. Navajo Textiles makes the history and practice of Navajo weaving accessible to an audience of scholars and laypeople both within and outside the Diné community.
Navajo rugs

One Hundred Years of Navajo Rugs

Author: Marian E. Rodee

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Navajo rugs

Page: 187

View: 238

A guide to identifying and dating rugs by means of weaving materials, providing historical background on the great Navajo weavers and traders.
Economic assistance, Domestic

Vista volunteer

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Economic assistance, Domestic

Page:

View: 340