History

NEW VIEWPOINTS IN AMER HIST

Author: Arthur M. (Arthur Meier) 1. Schlesinger

Publisher: Wentworth Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 324

View: 685

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.
History

New Views of Borderlands History

Author: Robert Howard Jackson

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 260

View: 268

These seven original essays offer the first ethnohistorical interpretation of Spanish-Indian interaction from Florida to California. The indigenous peoples in the borderlands were hunter-gatherers or agriculturalists whose lives differed substantially from the lives of Indians in large-scale hierarchical societies of central Mexico. As a result, Spain's entry and expansion varied throughout the borderlands. How did indigenous peoples fare under Spanish rule from the sixteenth through the eighteenth centuries? The contributors to this book discuss the social, demographic, and economic impacts of Spanish colonization on Indians. Relations among settlers, soldiers, priests, and indigenous peoples throughout the borderlands are examined, bringing immediacy and human interest to the interpretation. Contributors are Susan M. Deeds, Jesus F. de la Teja, Ross Frank, Robert H. Jackson, Peter Stern, and Patricia Wickman. Their essays offer a new and engaging synthesis that will reinvigorate teaching and research in borderlands history.
History

Rethinking America

Author: John M. Murrin

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 424

View: 932

For five decades John M. Murrin has been the consummate historian's historian. This volume brings together his seminal essays on the American Revolution, the United States Constitution, and the early American Republic. Collectively, they rethink fundamental questions regarding American identity, the decision to declare independence in 1776, and the impact the American Revolution had on the nation it produced. By digging deeply into questions that have shaped the field for several generations, Rethinking America argues that high politics and the study of constitutional and ideological questions--broadly the history of elites--must be considered in close conjunction with issues of economic inequality, class conflict, and racial division. Bringing together different schools of history and a variety of perspectives on both Britain and the North American colonies, it explains why what began as a constitutional argument, that virtually all expected would remain contained within the British Empire, exploded into a truly subversive and radical revolution that destroyed monarchy and aristocracy and replaced them with a rapidly transforming and chaotic republic. This volume examines the period of the early American Republic and discusses why the Founders' assumptions about what their Revolution would produce were profoundly different than the society that emerged from the American Revolution. In many ways, Rethinking America suggests that the outcome of the American Revolution put the new United States on a path to a violent and bloody civil war. With an introduction by Andrew Shankman, this long-awaited work by one of the most important scholars of the Revolutionary era offers a coherent interpretation of the complex period that saw the breakdown of colonial British North America and the founding of the United States.
Reference

Surnames in the United States Census of 1790

Author: American Council of Learned Societies. Committee on Linguistic and National Stocks in the Population of the United States

Publisher: Genealogical Publishing Com

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 335

View: 919

This work lists and classifies thousands of surnames according to the several states in which they were found in 1790, thus enabling researchers to narrow their search to a particular area. English, Scottish, Celtic Irish, Ulster Irish, German, Dutch, French, and Swedish names predominate.
Political Science

Realignment

Author: Theodore Rosenof

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 254

View: 361

Realignment: The Theory that Changed the Way We Think About American Politics tells the dramatic story of how a new approach to American politics emerged in the afternmath of Harry Truman's stunning 1948 election upset victory. This approach realignment theory held that critical elections such as those of the Civil War era, the 1890's, and the 1930's shaped politics for decades to come. Theodore Rosenof details how realignment theory emerged as the predominant explanation of electoral change and how, after decades of analysis, it remains a subject of continuing influence and controversy. The first history of this important theory, Realignment weaves history and political science into a compelling look at American elections."