Art

Newspaper Blackout

Author: Austin Kleon

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 208

View: 523

“Some of the results are hilarious, some are profound and even unsettling, but they are never bland or boring.” — Ephermerist Newspaper article + sharpie = Newspaper Blackout Poetry: Instead of starting with a blank page, poet Austin Kleon grabs a newspaper and a permanent marker and eliminates the words he doesn’t need. Fans of Not Quite What I Was Planning and Post Secret will love these unique and compelling poems culled from Austin’s popular website.
Education

Wounded Writers Ask: Am I Doing it Write?

Author: S. Rebecca Leigh

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 116

View: 947

This book addresses (and aims to dismantle) writer woundedness, a state of being that prevents students from trusting themselves as capable of writing something they can feel good about. Wounded Writers Ask: Am I Doing it Write? invites students to begin a new writing history through a collection of 48 free-writes that explore list writing, aesthetic writing, word craft, and writing that delves into personal life stories. These free-writes are invitations to develop a lead or improve a story title, to discover a character’s name or replace one word for another that is more vivid, to locate a story idea or revise a story’s focus. More than this, Wounded Writers Ask: Am I Doing it Write? emphasizes creative consciousness over correctness, where writing is a vehicle for exploring identity and (re)claiming voice across multiple grade levels. This book is for the wounded student writer as much as it is for the wounded classroom teacher as writer, who may feel burdened by his/her own writing history such that he/she struggles with where or how to start. For each free-write, Leigh offers Before Writing, During Writing, and After Writing suggestions with samples of student writing to guide teachers into writing engagements with their students that break down walls and open up new vistas.
Antitrust law

Failing Newspaper Act

Author: United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on the Judiciary. Subcommittee on Antitrust and Monopoly

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Antitrust law

Page:

View: 724

Considers S. 1312, to exempt from the antitrust laws certain combinations and arrangements necessary for the survival of failing newspapers. Includes report "Newspaper Monopolies and the Antitrust Laws, a Study of the Failing Newspaper Act;" by International Typographical Union, 1967 (p. 125-172).
Language Arts & Disciplines

Cultural Meanings of News

Author: Daniel A. Berkowitz

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 409

View: 824

What is news? Why does news turn out like it does? What factors influence the creation, production, and dissemination of news? Cultural Meanings of News takes on these deceptively simple questions through an essential collection of seminal and contemporary studies by leaders in the fields of mass communication and media studies. Similar in format and purpose to editor Dan Berkowitz's award-winning Social Meanings of News, this new volume represents a conceptual update, a continuation of the discourse about the nature of news and how it comes to be, moving ideas ahead from the earlier tradition of sociological approaches to the more pervasive cultural perspectives that inform understandings about news. Cultural Meanings of News provides a carefully selected set of readings, organized into thematic areas that each probe a dimension of the literature: from sociological roots to cultural perspectives; news as narrative and cultural text; newswork as cultural ritual; news as cultural myth; news and its interpretive communities; news as a source and reflection of collective memory; toward the future of news research. This text-reader provides students and scholars with first-hand exposure to cultural approaches to the study of news, while also providing an organizing framework for understanding the commonalties and differences between threads in the research. The goals are to engage readers through guided immersion in the material.
Social Science

Law-and-Order News

Author: Steve Chibnall

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 254

Tavistock Press was established as a co-operative venture between the Tavistock Institute and Routledge & Kegan Paul (RKP) in the 1950s to produce a series of major contributions across the social sciences. This volume is part of a 2001 reissue of a selection of those important works which have since gone out of print, or are difficult to locate. Published by Routledge, 112 volumes in total are being brought together under the name The International Behavioural and Social Sciences Library: Classics from the Tavistock Press. Reproduced here in facsimile, this volume was originally published in 1977 and is available individually. The collection is also available in a number of themed mini-sets of between 5 and 13 volumes, or as a complete collection.
Social Science

Media System and News Selections in Namibia

Author: Andreas Rothe

Publisher: LIT Verlag Münster

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 219

View: 972

What is the status quo of the Namibian media system? What radio and TV stations, what newspapers and magazines compete for the attention of the Namibian citizen? What is the situation regarding press freedom and the formal education prospective journalists receive? How do Namibian journalists select news? Is the so far European-focused News Value Theory a sensible explanatory approach for that? How does news selection differ from Namibia to Germany, from private to state media in Namibia, from print to broadcasting? These are some of the central issues author Andreas Rothe addresses in this English language version of his diploma thesis.
History

The Invention of News

Author: Andrew Pettegree

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 453

View: 772

“A fascinating account of the gathering and dissemination of news from the end of the Middle Ages to the French Revolution” and the rise of the newspaper (Glenn Altschuler, The Huffington Post). Long before the invention of printing, let alone the daily newspaper, people wanted to stay informed. In the pre-industrial era, news was mostly shared through gossip, sermons, and proclamations. The age of print brought pamphlets, ballads, and the first news-sheets. In this groundbreaking history, renowned historian Andrew Pettegree tracks the evolution of news in ten countries over the course of four centuries, examining the impact of news media on contemporary events and the lives of an ever-more-informed public. The Invention of News sheds light on who controlled the news and who reported it; the use of news as a tool of political protest and religious reform; issues of privacy and titillation; the persistent need for news to be current and for journalists to be trustworthy; and people’s changing sense of themselves and their communities as they experienced newly opened windows on the world. “This expansive view of news and how it reached people will be fascinating to readers interested in communication and cultural history.” —Library Journal (starred review)
Education

Strategic Writing Mini-Lessons for All Students, Grades 4–8

Author: Janet C. Richards

Publisher: Corwin Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 264

View: 172

Power up writing instruction with short, differentiated lessons! The hard reality? By the time they reach middle school, many of our students still lack basic writing skills, and this is their last opportunity to get up to speed before they reach high school. This toolbox of 23 mini-lessons will help you intervene and develop confident, competent writers. You'll find: Proven lessons that develop four essential writing strategies: inventing, drafting, revising, and editing Adaptations for struggling writers, English Language Learners, and advanced writers, with visual tools A schematic linking lessons to Common Core grade-level goals
History

Rampant Women

Author: Linda J. Lumsden

Publisher: Univ. of Tennessee Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 273

View: 843

In Rampant Women, Linda J. Lumsden offers an in-depth look at the intersection between the woman suffrage movement and the constitutional right to assemble peaceably. Beginning in 1908, women activists took to the streets in a variety of public gatherings and protests in a bold attempt to win the right to vote. Lumsden shows how outdoor pageants, conventions, petition drives, soapbox speaking at open-air meetings, the use of symbolic expression, and picketing -- all manifestations of the right of assembly -- played an instrumental role in the woman suffrage movement. Without these innovative forms of protest, Lumsden argues, women might not be voting today in the United States.
History

New York City

Author: George J. Lankevich

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 276

View: 370

Recent controversies surrounding the war on terror and American intervention in Iraq and Afghanistan have brought rule of law rhetoric to a fevered pitch. While President Obama has repeatedly emphasized his Administration’s commitment to transparency and the rule of law, nowhere has this resolve been so quickly and severely tested than with the issue of the possible prosecution of Bush Administration officials. While some worry that without legal consequences there will be no effective deterrence for the repetition of future transgressions of justice committed at the highest levels of government, others echo Obama’s seemingly reluctant stance on launching an investigation into allegations of criminal wrongdoing by former President Bush, Vice President Cheney, Secretary Rumsfeld, and members of the Office of Legal Counsel. Indeed, even some of the Bush Administration’s harshest critics suggest that we should avoid such confrontations, that the price of political division is too high. Measured or partisan, scholarly or journalistic, clearly the debate about accountability for the alleged crimes of the Bush Administration will continue for some time. Using this debate as its jumping off point, When Governments Break the Law takes an interdisciplinary approach to the legal challenges posed by the criminal wrongdoing of governments. But this book is not an indictment of the Bush Administration; rather, the contributors take distinct positions for and against the proposition, offering revealing reasons and illuminating alternatives. The contributors do not ask the substantive question of whether any Bush Administration officials, in fact, violated the law, but rather the procedural, legal, political, and cultural questions of what it would mean either to pursue criminal prosecutions or to refuse to do so. By presuming that officials could be prosecuted, these essays address whether they should. When Governments Break the Law provides a valuable and timely commentary on what is likely to be an ongoing process of understanding the relationship between politics and the rule of law in times of crisis. Contributors: Claire Finkelstein, Lisa Hajjar, Daniel Herwitz, Stephen Holmes, Paul Horwitz, Nasser Hussain, Austin Sarat, and Stephen I. Vladeck.