Law

Nothing to Hide

Author: Daniel J. Solove

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 245

View: 397

"If you've got nothing to hide," many people say, "you shouldn't worry about government surveillance." Others argue that we must sacrifice privacy for security. But as Daniel J. Solove argues in this important book, these arguments and many others are flawed. They are based on mistaken views about what it means to protect privacy and the costs and benefits of doing so. The debate between privacy and security has been framed incorrectly as a zero-sum game in which we are forced to choose between one value and the other. Why can't we have both? In this concise and accessible book, Solove exposes the fallacies of many pro-security arguments that have skewed law and policy to favor security at the expense of privacy. Protecting privacy isn't fatal to security measures; it merely involves adequate oversight and regulation. Solove traces the history of the privacy-security debate from the Revolution to the present day. He explains how the law protects privacy and examines concerns with new technologies. He then points out the failings of our current system and offers specific remedies. Nothing to Hide makes a powerful and compelling case for reaching a better balance between privacy and security and reveals why doing so is essential to protect our freedom and democracy. -- David Cole
Law

Reforming European Data Protection Law

Author: Serge Gutwirth

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 406

View: 511

This book on privacy and data protection offers readers conceptual analysis as well as thoughtful discussion of issues, practices, and solutions. It features results of the seventh annual International Conference on Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection, CPDP 2014, held in Brussels January 2014. The book first examines profiling, a persistent core issue of data protection and privacy. It covers the emergence of profiling technologies, on-line behavioral tracking, and the impact of profiling on fundamental rights and values. Next, the book looks at preventing privacy risks and harms through impact assessments. It contains discussions on the tools and methodologies for impact assessments as well as case studies. The book then goes on to cover the purported trade-off between privacy and security, ways to support privacy and data protection, and the controversial right to be forgotten, which offers individuals a means to oppose the often persistent digital memory of the web. Written during the process of the fundamental revision of the current EU data protection law by the Data Protection Package proposed by the European Commission, this interdisciplinary book presents both daring and prospective approaches. It will serve as an insightful resource for readers with an interest in privacy and data protection.
LAW

Indigenous Intellectual Property

Author: Matthew Rimmer

Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing

ISBN:

Category: LAW

Page: 752

View: 355

Taking an interdisciplinary approach unmatched by any other book on this topic, this thoughtful Handbook considers the international struggle to provide for proper and just protection of Indigenous intellectual property (IP). In light of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples 2007, expert contributors assess the legal and policy controversies over Indigenous knowledge in the fields of international law, copyright law, trademark law, patent law, trade secrets law, and cultural heritage. The overarching discussion examines national developments in Indigenous IP in the United States, Canada, South Africa, the European Union, Australia, New Zealand, and Indonesia. The Handbook provides a comprehensive overview of the historical origins of conflict over Indigenous knowledge, and examines new challenges to Indigenous IP from emerging developments in information technology, biotechnology, and climate change. Practitioners and scholars in the field of IP will learn a great deal from this Handbook about the issues and challenges that surround just protection of a variety of forms of IP for Indigenous communities.
Language Arts & Disciplines

Protecting Patron Privacy

Author: Bobbi Newman

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 152

View: 746

This LITA Guide offers readers guidance on a wide range of topics, including foundations of privacy in libraries; data collection, retention, use, and protection; laws and regulations; privacy instruction; contracts with third parties; and use of in-house and internet tools including social network sites, surveillance video, and RFID.
Social Science

Surveillance in Europe

Author: David Wright

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 422

View: 110

Surveillance in Europe is an accessible, definitive and comprehensive overview of the rapidly growing multi-disciplinary field of surveillance studies in Europe. Written by experts in the field, including leading scholars, the Companion’s clear and up to date style will appeal to a wide range of scholars and students in the social sciences, arts and humanities. This book makes the case for greater resilience in European society in the face of the growing pervasiveness of surveillance. It examines surveillance in Europe from several different perspectives, including: the co-evolution of surveillance technologies and practices the surveillance industry in Europe the instrumentality of surveillance for preventing and detecting crime and terrorism social and economic costs impacts of surveillance on civil liberties resilience in Europe’s surveillance society. the consequences and impacts for Europe of the Snowden revelations findings and recommendations regarding surveillance in Europe Surveillance in Europe's interdisciplinary approach and accessible content makes it an ideal companion to academics, policy-makers and civil society organisations alike, as well as appealing to top level undergraduates and postgraduates.
Political Science

Privacy: A Very Short Introduction

Author: Raymond Wacks

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 160

View: 537

Some would argue that scarcely a day passes without a new assault on our privacy. In the wake of the whistle-blower Edward Snowden's revelations about the extent of surveillance conducted by the security services in the United States, Britain, and elsewhere, concerns about individual privacy have significantly increased. The Internet generates risks, unimagined even twenty years ago, to the security and integrity of information in all its forms. The manner in which information is collected, stored, exchanged, and used has changed forever; and with it, the character of the threats to individual privacy. The scale of accessible private data generated by the phenomenal growth of blogs, social media, and other contrivances of our information age pose disturbing threats to our privacy. And the hunger for gossip continues to fuel sensationalist media that frequently degrade the notion of a private domain to which we reasonably lay claim. In the new edition of this Very Short Introduction, Raymond Wacks looks at all aspects of privacy to include numerous recent changes, and considers how this fundamental value might be reconciled with competing interests such as security and freedom of expression. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.