Children's stories

Olga Moves House

Author: Michael Bond

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Children's stories

Page: 134

View: 683

A brand new book about the mischievous guinea-pig, Olga da Polga. Winter has come to the Sawdust household, and Olga's been moved into a new home, inside the house. She's very excited about this and even manages to get Mrs Sawdust to redecorate her box! Olga enjoys watching the comings and goings in the house and gets up to all kinds of mischief and embarks on many wonderful adventures. * A brand new Olga da Polga book, being published together with reissues the backlist titles. * Best-selling author of 'Paddington Bear' books. This is his first book for some years. * Illustrated throughout with enchanting black and white artwork. * Lively and humorous stories with a wonderful leading character.
Children's stories

Olga Meets Her Match

Author: Michael Bond

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Children's stories

Page: 150

View: 602

The further adventures of Olga as she matches wits with Boris, another guinea pig, who tells stories even taller than her own.
Children's stories

Olga Carries on

Author: Michael Bond

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Children's stories

Page: 148

View: 551

'Wheeeeeeeee!' squeaked Olga. 'Ombomstiggywoggles and Wheeeeeeeeee! Wheeeeeeeeeeee! Wheeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee!' What can it mean? Olga isn't telling, but Noel, Fangio, and Graham are very impressed. So are Fircone and Raisin the newcomers to the Sawdust family home who arrive just in time to hear Olga's first attempts at poetry.
Drama

Rooms in Dramatic Realism

Author: Fred Miller Robinson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 114

View: 874

Dramatic Realism, since its birth in the hectic late years of the nineteenth century, gave theatrical and thematic energy to the interaction between a play’s text and the way that it looked on the stage. Characters began to find themselves in rooms and settings that played an active and changing role in the drama, and their dialogue and reactions evolved in time with these changes. As life itself became more elaborate during the 20th Century, so these rooms were invaded and then defined by the outside world. Fred Miller Robinson’s enjoyable and stimulating essays on this enduring genre tackle the dreams and anxieties of the middles classes of the Industrial Revolution – dreams of domestic comfort and refuge, and anxieties about how entrapping that comfort could be. Moving from Ibsen to Chekhov and onwards into later plays in which the reality of ‘Realism’ comes under scrutiny, this is a book to dip into before a performance or to study during a class.
Biography & Autobiography

The Mystery of Olga Chekhova

Author: Antony Beevor

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 336

View: 340

Antony Beevor's The Mystery of Olga Chekhova is the true story of a family torn apart by revolution and war. Olga Chekhova was a stunning Russian beauty and a famous Nazi-era film actress who Hitler counted among his friends; she was also the niece of Anton Chekhov. After fleeing Bolshevik Moscow for Berlin in 1920, she was recruited by her composer brother Lev, to work for Soviet intelligence. In return, her family were allowed to join her. The extraordinary story of how the whole family survived the Russian Revolution, the civil war, the rise of Hitler, the Stalinist Terror, and the Nazi invasion of the Soviet Union becomes, in Antony Beevor's hands, a breathtaking tale of compromise and survival in a merciless age.
Fiction

The Parrots

Author: Alexandra Shulman

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 256

View: 699

Outsiders see things others don't. Blessed with status, love, wealth and connections the Tennisons seemed the most enviable of families - until Antonella and Matteo Fullardi, dangerously attractive Italian siblings and offspring of an Italian fashion dynasty, enter their well-managed lives. Calligrapher Katherine, gallery owner Rick and their student son Josh discover that the Fullardis are just as unsettling and alluring as the exotic parrots that now inhabit their tranquil London garden. But this damaged pair are the catalyst that propel the Tennisons into a spiral of chaos, calling into question their place in a changing world of new money, new morality and new menace.
Travel

The City of Falling Angels

Author: John Berendt

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: Travel

Page: 384

View: 719

Taking the fire that destroyed the Fenice theatre in 1996 as his starting point, John Berendt creates a unique and unforgettable portrait of Venice and its extraordinary inhabitants. Beneath the exquisite facade of the world's most beautiful historic city, scandal, corruption and venality are rampant, and John Berendt is a master at seeking them out. Ezra Pound and his mistress, Olga; poet Mario Stefani; the Rat Man of Treviso; or Mario Moro - self-styled carabiniere, fireman, soldier or airman, depending on the day of the week. With his background in journalism, Berendt is perfectly poised to gain access to private and unapproachable people, and persuade them to talk frankly to him. The result is mischievous, witty, compelling - and destined to be the non-fiction succes d'estime of the year.
Africa, East

Olga in Kenya

Author: Elizabeth Watkins

Publisher: Britwell Books

ISBN:

Category: Africa, East

Page: 278

View: 339

Some people achieve far more than their time on earth should allow, making a real difference to many, yet unrecognised by most.Olga Baillie-Grohman is one such person. The summary of her life reads as an extraordinary catalogue of events ? born in Austria within hours of Adolf Hitler and Charlie Chaplin, she married a Kenyan soldier-settler and was recruited to British Intelligence work. Her second marriage to a senior Government official enabled her to fulfil many missions in life - elected as the first female member of the Nairobi City Council followed by the Kenyan Legislative Council, Olga used her standing to advance better urban housing for African's, education for the continents women and as a representative to the smaller coffee farmers. Olga?s story is one that should not be forgotten as it is a guiding light for putting the world to rights and an inspiration to others.
Social Science

Olga Tufnell’s 'Perfect Journey'

Author: John D.M. Green

Publisher: UCL Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 454

View: 518

Olga Tufnell (1905–85) was a British archaeologist working in Egypt, Cyprus and Palestine in the 1920s and 1930s, a period often described as a golden age of archaeological discovery. For the first time, this book presents Olga’s account of her experiences in her own words. Based largely on letters home, the text is accompanied by dozens of photographs that shed light on personal experiences of travel and dig life at this extraordinary time. Introductory material by John D.M. Green and Ros Henry provides the social, historical, biographical and archaeological context for the overall narrative. The letters offer new insights into the social and professional networks and history of archaeological research, particularly for Palestine under the British Mandate. They provide insights into the role of foreign archaeologists, relationships with local workers and inhabitants, and the colonial framework within which they operated during turbulent times. This book will be an important resource for those studying the history of archaeology in the Eastern Mediterranean, particularly for the sites of Qau el-Kebir, Tell Fara, Tell el-‘Ajjul and Tell ed-Duweir (ancient Lachish). Moreover, Olga’s lively style makes this a fascinating personal account of archaeology and travel in the interwar era.
Fiction

I wish... I wish... I wish...

Author: Silvia Elena Calzadilla

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 112

View: 566

Andrés, like many other kids, doesn’t appreciate anything in his life and is always complaining about everything. One night he goes to bed angry at his mom because she won’t get him something he wants, so before going to sleep he wishes for a new life and new parents. His wish comes true but not exactly the way he expects, and the next day he wakes up in a small and very poor house he doesn’t recognize. Andrés is very upset and confused because even though he wished for a new life, he doesn’t want to be stuck in this new poor life forever. Somehow he is going to have to figure out ‘the secret’ that could take him back to his old life.
Education

Close to Home

Author: Juan C. Guerra

Publisher: Teachers College Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 189

View: 534

When teachers are familiar with what adults and children bring with them into the classroom, they are far better prepared to develop appropriate curricula and pedagogical techniques. Close to Home is a unique portrayal and analysis of the language, literacy, and cultural resources of a social network of Mexicano adults living in a rural community in Mexico and Chicago's inner city. By exploring the ways in which this group's experiences as immigrants have affected their communicative practices, the author provides a basis for understanding how researchers, policy makers, and educators can provide these adults and their children with a relevant education that effectively embraces their schooling and lived experience. After establishing a historical and sociocultural context for the author's analysis, this rich ethnographic study presents a variety of oral and written sample texts, including tape recordings of everyday oral language use, personal letters, and autobiographical writing.
Fiction

The House Sitter

Author: Peter Lovesey

Publisher: Soho Press

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 346

View: 447

The corpse of a beautiful woman, clad in only a bathing suit, is found strangled to death on a popular Sussex beach. When she is finally identified, it turns out she was a top profiler for the National Crime Faculty, who was working on the case of a serial killer. And though she was a Bath resident, the authorities don't want Detective Superintendent Peter Diamond to investigate the murder. How strange. What could they be trying to hide?
Literary Criticism

Ezra Pound's and Olga Rudge's The Blue Spill

Author: Ezra Pound

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 192

View: 241

Written during the Italian winter of 1930, The Blue Spill is an unfinished detective novel written by Ezra Pound – the leading figure of modernist poetry in the 20th century – and his long-time companion Olga Rudge. Published for the first time in this authoritative critical edition, the novel reflects both Rudge's and Pound's voracious reading of popular fiction as it echoes and parodies such writers as Agatha Christie, Dorothy L. Sayers and P.G. Wodehouse. Based on the original manuscripts of the novel, this critical edition includes annotation and textual commentary throughout. The book also includes critical essays exploring the contexts of the work, from the dynamics of artistic collaboration to the growing popularity of detective fiction at the beginning of the 20th century. Taken together, this unique publication sheds new light on the relationship between the literary avant-garde and popular culture in the modernist period.
Business & Economics

Harvey Houses of New Mexico

Author: Rosa Walston Latimer

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 147

View: 260

A look at the memorable chain of restaurants and hotels and its place in New Mexico’s history. The Santa Fe Line and the famous Fred Harvey restaurants forever changed New Mexico and the Southwest, bringing commerce, culture, and opportunity to a desolate frontier. The first Harvey Girls ever hired staffed the Raton location. In a departure from the ubiquitous black and white uniform immortalized by Judy Garland in 1946’s TheHarvey Girls, many of New Mexico’s Harvey Girls wore colorful dresses reflective of local culture. In Albuquerque, the Harvey-managed Alvarado Hotel doubled as a museum for carefully curated native art. Join author Rosa Walston Latimer and discover New Mexico’s unique history of hospitality the “Fred Harvey way.”
Fiction

The Chasm of Hell

Author: Sam Chehade

Publisher: Australian Self Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 502

View: 832

When Gordeff discovers a wall while hiking in the mountains near his village in far northern Russia and sees the terrifying creatures for himself, he realises the stories about King Dhul-Qarnayn are all true. When he later witnesses the collapse of the Last Great Barrier, he knows it will not be long before the nations of Gog and Magog (Yajouj wa majouj) pour forth to wreak their brutal vengeance on an unsuspecting world. Set in the not-too-distant future after a devastating global war, the author Sam Chehade tells in his novel, The Chasm of Hell, of Gordeff’s epic journey to warn humanity of the danger it faces. In a society where most forms of technology – including electricity and explosive weaponry – have been banned, Gordeff and his three companions must find a way to cross the continent and collaborate with both the ruling Candlelight Party and the rebel forces that oppose it. Nothing less than the fate of the human race is at stake.
History

Olga

Author: Fernando Morais

Publisher: Grove/Atlantic, Inc.

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 692

This “heartbreaking biography” of the Communist revolutionary “is filled with high drama,” daring escapes, and eventual imprisonment in Nazi Germany (Publishers Weekly). A German-born Jew, Olga Benario was one of the most remarkable Communist activists of the twentieth century. With a genius for organization and an unwavering devotion, she crisscrossed the globe educating and activating legions to combat the worldwide plagues of Nazism and fascism. At the age of nineteen, she masterminded a daring prison raid to free her lover, the Communist intellectual Otto Braun. Together they escaped to Moscow, where they quickly rose in the ranks of the international Communist movement. At twenty-six, Benario was chosen to serve as bodyguard to the legendary Brazilian guerrilla leader Luis Carlos Prestes, who had been brought to Moscow for training and would soon become her new lover. Traveling under assumed names, they crossed Europe and North America to reach Brazil, where Prestes would launch a revolution against the fascist regime. But tragically, within months, they were seized by police. From Brazil, Olga, then seven months pregnant, was deported to Nazi Germany. She was subsequently sent to Ravensbruck concentration camp, and in February 1942 she was sent to her death in the gas chambers at Bernburg.
Fiction

Legacy of the Priest

Author: Stephen P. Matava

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 396

View: 767

Our tale begins in a small town in Slovakia, in the shadows of the High Tatra mountains where each day was a matter of survival. The time was 1849 when the power of the Roman Catholic Church was declining. A young, unconventional priest was sent to a broken down abbey to restore the influence of the church. He started the rebuilding process when he found a baby on the door step of the church. The priest decided to raise the boy in the abbey and to prepare him for the priesthood when the boy fell in love with a young woman. The priests battle between the love for the boy and the love for his God began. He fought the church and his superiors for the sake of the young man who, finally left his training for the priesthood and married the young lady; they had five sons and one daughter, raised in the shadow of the church. Living under the yoke of the Austrian-Hungary Empire became more of pure survival. Trying to leave the country prior to the war became their primary goal. The family moved to the United States; one by one. Each one scrimped and saved to bring the next one over. World War I erupted and the youngest boy, Stefan was drafted into the army of the empire before he could take his parents to America. He fought in the war for which he has no sympathy and left his elderly parents in the hands of the hired help. He spent two years on the Russian front where he was wounded. After his recovery, he was sent to the Alps where he was captured and spent two years as an American prisoner of war Stefan returned after he was released from prison and fell in love with the woman who had taken care of his mother and father. His father died and Stefan took his mother, his pregnant wife and came to America to be with his family. Their first born was delivered on a steamer half way across the Atlantic ocean. They finally landed in Boston to begin their life in the textile mills of Cohoes New York. The story tells of the conflicts encountered in a rural area of eastern Europe. The infuence of the church and very strong family values which were brought to this country and are still a part of the lives of people who left the oppressions of Europe. Life was hard, but the family survived and this is what makes up the bulk of the population of our country today. It tells of the power and force that our forefathers had and the determination to come to this country so we could be born free.
Literary Criticism

The House in Russian Literature

Author: Joost van Baak

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 528

View: 818

The domestic theme has a tremendous anthropological, literary and cultural significance. The purpose of this book is to analyse and interpret the most important realisations and tendencies of this thematic complex in the history of Russian literature. It is the first systematic book-length exploration of the meaning and development of the House theme in Russian literature of the past 200 years. It studies the ideological, psychological and moral meanings which Russian cultural and literary tradition have invested in the house or projected on it in literary texts. Central to this study’s approach is the concept of the House Myth, consisting of a set of basic fabular elements and a set of general types of House images. This House Myth provides the general point of reference from which the literary works were analyzed and compared. With the help of this analytical procedure characteristics of individual authors could be described as well as recurrent patterns and features discerned in the way Russian literature dealt with the House and its thematics, thus reflecting characteristics of Russian literary world pictures, Russian mentalities and Russian attitudes towards life. This book is of interest for students of Russian literature as well as for those interested in the House as a cultural and literary topic, in the semiotics of literature, and in relations between culture, anthropology and literature.
Fiction

The Lost Soul

Author: Olga Tokarczuk

Publisher: Seven Stories Press

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 48

View: 953

The only book in English for readers of all ages by Nobel Prize-winning novelist Olga Tokarczuk is a beautifully illustrated meditation on the fullness of life. "Olga Tokarczuk’s The Lost Soul, an experimental fable illustrated by Joanna Concejo and translated by Antonia Lloyd-Jones, resonates with our current moment. . . . What a striking, and lovely, material object it is." —New York Times "The Lost Soul, by Olga Tokarczuk and illustrator Joanna Concejo, is a quiet meditation on happiness, following a busy man who loses his soul. . . It pours a childlike sense of wonder into a once-upon-a-time tale that is already resonating with adults around the world." —Guardian The Lost Soul is a deeply moving reflection on our capacity to live in peace with ourselves, to remain patient, attentive to the world. It is a story that beautifully weaves together the voice of the Nobel Prize-winning Polish novelist Olga Tokarczuk and the finely detailed pen-and-ink drawings of illustrator Joanna Concejo, who together create a parallel narrative universe full of secrets, evocative of another time. Here a man has forgotten what makes his heart feel full. He moves to a house away from all that is familiar to him to wait for his soul to return. "Once upon a time there was a man who worked very hard and very quickly, and who had left his soul far behind him long ago. In fact his life was all right without his soul—he slept, ate, worked, drove a car and even played tennis. But sometimes he felt as if the world around him were flat, as if he were moving across a smooth page in a math book that was covered in evenly spaced squares... " —from The Lost Soul The Lost Soul is a sublime album, a rare delicacy that will delight readers young and old. "You must find a place of your own, sit there quietly and wait for your soul." Winner of the Bologna Ragazzi Award, Special Mention 2018, Prix de l'Union Internationale pour les Livres de Jeunesse (IBBY), The White Raven (IJB Munich), and the Łódź Design Festival Award.
Biography & Autobiography

Sophie Halaby in Jerusalem

Author: Laura S. Schor

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page:

View: 605

A pioneer among Palestinian artists, Sophie Halaby was the first Arab woman to study art in Paris, subsequently living independently as a professional painter in Jerusalem throughout her life. She was born in 1906 in Kiev to a Russian mother and a Christian Arab father. Her family fled to Jerusalem in 1917 in the wake of the Russian Revolution. Her life was marked by violence and war, including the Arab Revolt from 1936 to 1939, the Nakba in 1948, and the Six-Day War in 1967. In response, Halaby drew a series of political cartoons criticizing British rule and Zionist goals; later in life, she followed the work of younger artists who supported the Palestine liberation movement. However, the political turmoil of her times is largely not depicted in her art. Instead, her work is a tribute to the enduring beauty of the landscape and flora of Jerusalem, often sketched in pen and ink or red and black chalk, and painted with egg tempera, oils, and watercolors. Schor’s compelling biography shines new light on this little-known artist and enriches our understanding of modern Palestinian history.