Language Arts & Disciplines

Open Court Reading Program Overview Grade K-3

Author: Bereiter et al.

Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 144

View: 956

The Program Overview provides an in-depth look at Open Court Reading and how the program addresses instructional areas such as: phonological and phonemic awareness, fluency, inquiry, comprehension, and writing.
Reading

SRA Open Court Reading: Levels K-3

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Reading

Page:

View: 264

A tool designed to help the teacher make informed instructional decisions reguarding the placement of a student in a component of the Open Court Reading Program.

Open Court Reading 2002

Author: WrightGroup/McGraw-Hill

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 428

Contains planning, differentiation, and assessment tips that enhance instruction in print and book awareness, letter recognition, phonological and phonemic awareness, and more.

Open Court Reading 2002

Author: WrightGroup/McGraw-Hill Staff

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 139

Intervention Workbook (BLM and ATE) Activities providepractice and support for lessons presented in the interventionGuide.

Hearings

Author: United States. Congress. House. Committee on Education

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 304

Language arts (Elementary)

SRA Open Court Reading

Author: Marilyn Jager Adams

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Language arts (Elementary)

Page:

View: 648

Learning disabled children

Learning Disabilities and Early Intervention Strategies

Author: United States. Congress. House. Committee on Education and the Workforce. Subcommittee on Education Reform

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Learning disabled children

Page: 123

View: 651

Education

Teachers of English Learners Negotiating Authoritarian Policies

Author: Lucinda Pease-Alvarez

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 71

View: 858

In an effort to reverse the purported crisis in U.S. public schools, the federal government, states, and districts have mandated policies that favor standardized approaches to teaching and assessment. As a consequence, teachers have been relying on teacher-centered instructional approaches that do not take into consideration the needs, experiences, and interests of their students; this is particularly pronounced with English learners (ELs). The widespread implementation of these policies is particularly striking in California, where more than 25% of all public school students are ELs. This volume reports on three studies that explore how teachers of ELs in three school districts negotiated these policies. Drawing on sociocultural and poststructural perspectives on agency and power, the authors examine how contexts in which teachers of ELs lived and worked influenced the messages they constructed about these policies and mediated their decisions about policy implementation. The volume provides important insights into processes affecting the learning and teaching of ELs.