Business & Economics

Paratransit in America

Author: Robert Cervero

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 281

View: 514

Paratransit challenges conventional fixed-route, fixed-schedule systems of public transportation in the United States.
Local transit

Paratransit Contracting and Service Delivery Methods

Author: Rosalyn M. Simon

Publisher: Transportation Research Board

ISBN:

Category: Local transit

Page: 35

View: 548

Offers information from selected transit agencies about the operational practices used to provide Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) paratransit services and identifies factors perceived by transit personnel to have influenced the selection of service delivery methodology. It focuses on the state of the practice in paratransit contracting and service delivery methods to comply with ADA paratransit provisions.
Paratransit services

Practices in No-show and Late Cancellation Policies for ADA Paratransit

Author:

Publisher: Transportation Research Board

ISBN:

Category: Paratransit services

Page: 49

View: 928

This synthesis documents current and innovative practices of U.S. transit agencies in the development and implementation of passenger no-show and late cancellation policies for paratransit programs operated under the regulatory requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA). It describes how some policies are administered, the community response, and their effectiveness in small, medium, and large transit agencies surveyed. It examines policies both as a way to improve system productivity, efficiency, and capacity, and as a means to better serve riders with disabilities who may experience difficulties with the advance reservation aspect of most ADA complementary paratransit operations. This topic is of interest to transit agencies that are responsible for providing ADA complementary paratransit that is efficient, cost-effective, and responsive to customer needs. It is also of interest to the disability community and other stakeholders who are concerned about having access to transportation services that are efficient, cost-effective, and appropriate for customer needs.
Bus drivers

Vehicle Operator Recruitment, Retention, and Performance in ADA Complementary Paratransit Operations

Author: Russell H. Thatcher

Publisher: Transportation Research Board

ISBN:

Category: Bus drivers

Page: 129

View: 541

TRB's Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Report 142: Vehicle Operator Recruitment, Retention, and Performance in ADA Complementary Paratransit Operations provides guidance for understanding the relationships that influence and enhance operator recruitment, retention, and performance in Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) complementary paratransit services. Appendixes to TCRP Report 142 were published electronically as TCRP Web-Only Document 50: Survey Instrument, Productivity Charts, and Interview Protocol for Case Studies for TCRP Report 142.
Paratransit services

Resource Guide for Commingling ADA and Non-ADA Paratransit Riders

Author: Rosemary B. Gerty

Publisher: Transportation Research Board

ISBN:

Category: Paratransit services

Page: 103

View: 712

TRB's Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Report 143: Resource Guide for Commingling ADA and Non-ADA Paratransit Riders is designed to help public transit agencies explore whether and how to commingle Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) paratransit and non-ADA paratransit riders. The guide is designed to help practitioners define the purposes and objectives for commingling riders, identify potential capacity and funding, evaluate service compatibility, and consider primary service parameters.
Architecture

Paratransit in African Cities

Author: Roger Behrens

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 312

View: 538

Public transport systems in contemporary Sub-Saharan African cities are heavily reliant upon paratransit services. These services are defined as informal transportation which operates between the public and individual private spheres. In Africa paratransit is characterized by low quality of vehicles and chaotic management but it also provides cheap, accessible and flexible transport solutions for the urban poor. It is typically poorly regulated and operates as a set of informal businesses. A common result of weak public sector regulation and a fare strategy in which owners claim a fixed daily revenue target and drivers who keep the variable balance as income, is destructive competition and poor quality of service. There is an incontrovertible case for improving the quality, reliability and coverage of public transport systems, and some city governments have attempted to do so by initiating reform projects that envisage the phased replacement of paratransit operations with formalised bus rapid transit systems. In this book the authors argue that there are, however, path dependencies and constraints that limit the possible extent of public transport system reform. Paratransit operations also have some inherent advantages with respect to demand responsiveness and service innovation. Attempts to eradicate paratransit may be neither pragmatic nor strategic. Two future scenarios are likely: hybrid systems comprised of both paratransit and formally planned modes; and systems improved by upgrades and strengthened regulation of existing paratransit services. The business strategies and aspirations of incumbent paratransit operators in three case cities – Cape Town, Dar es Salaam and Nairobi – are discussed, as well as their attitudes towards emerging public transport reform projects. International experiences of hybrid system regulation and paratransit business development are reviewed in order to explore policy options. The authors contend that policies recognising paratransit operators, and seeking contextually appropriate complementarity with formalised planned services, will produce greater benefits than policies ignoring their continued existence.
Biodiesel fuels

Paratransit Manager's Skills, Qualifications, and Needs

Author:

Publisher: Transportation Research Board

ISBN:

Category: Biodiesel fuels

Page: 52

View: 811

This synthesis documents current requirements for being a paratransit manager and actual experiences of current paratransit managers in their positions. Transit mangers, policy makers, educators, trainers, human resource directors, and stakeholders, as well as current and future paratransit professionals, will find the results valuable in determining action steps needed to enhance the profession and paratransit service delivery. In addition, it offers information from general managers, chief operating officers, and paratransit advisory committees about college degrees desired and guidance offered aspiring paratransit managers. Technology proficiency and knowledge of the Americans with Disabilities Act were identified as the most needed skills. College educations were recommended by a majority of the professionals, with business management identified as the most desirable area of study; however, aside from this, successes in the field were attributed to specifics such as ethics, customer relations, communications, management and supervision, and sensitivity.
Local transit

Toolkit for Integrating Non-dedicated Vehicles in Paratransit Service

Author: Nelson\Nygaard Consulting Associates

Publisher: Transportation Research Board

ISBN:

Category: Local transit

Page: 59

View: 156

TCRP Report 121: Toolkit for Integrating Non-Dedicated Vehicles in Paratransit Service is a toolkit that can be used by transportation managers to determine the appropriate split between dedicated and non-dedicated paratransit services to increase cost-effectiveness and meet peak demand needs. This report includes a Non-Dedicated Vehicle Optimization (NDV) Model and User Manual. The NDV Model is spreadsheet-based and may be used by paratransit system managers and planners to assist with making decisions regarding appropriate service ratios for specific conditions and environments. In addition to the toolkit, a Case Study Report and an Interim Report (which includes an analysis of factors that influence the mix of dedicated and non-dedicated paratransit service) are available for download from the project's website.
Transportation

Paratransit

Author: Corinne Mulley

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 464

View: 434

Recent technological advances have made feasible new and improved approaches for organizing and delivering local passenger transportation. This book draws on a selection of papers presented at the International Paratransit Conference in Monterey in October 2014 to capture these exciting developments.
Emergency transportation

Paratransit Emergency Preparedness and Operations Handbook

Author: M. Annabelle Boyd

Publisher: Transportation Research Board

ISBN:

Category: Emergency transportation

Page: 101

View: 825

"TRB's Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Report 160: Paratransit Emergency Preparedness and Operations Handbook includes guidance, strategies, tools, and resources to help paratransit service providers plan and prepare for, respond to, and recover from a range of emergencies. The guidance has applicability to urban, suburban, rural, and tribal paratransit operating environments. The project that developed TCRP Report 160 also a PowerPoint presentation describing the entire project. A link to the HTML version of TCRP Report 160 will be available on this site by the second week of March 2013."--Pub. info.
Local transit

Improving ADA Paratransit Demand Estimation

Author: Mark A. Bradley

Publisher: Transportation Research Board

ISBN:

Category: Local transit

Page: 96

View: 426

This report provides a sketch planning model and regional models to (1) improve the ability of metropolitan planning organizations and transit operators to estimate the probable future demand for Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) complementary paratransit service; and (2) predict travel by ADA paratransit-eligible individuals on all modes, not just ADA paratransit. All model parameters and coefficients are contained in this report and a fully implemented version is available on the enclosed CD-ROM, CRP-CD-121. This report will be of interest to regional, state, and federal agencies that oversee, plan, or finance public transportation; public transportation systems that provide ADA complementary paratransit services; and advocates for people with disabilities.
Architecture

Paratransit in African Cities

Author: Roger Behrens

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 312

View: 720

Public transport systems in contemporary Sub-Saharan African cities are heavily reliant upon paratransit services. These services are defined as informal transportation which operates between the public and individual private spheres. In Africa paratransit is characterized by low quality of vehicles and chaotic management but it also provides cheap, accessible and flexible transport solutions for the urban poor. It is typically poorly regulated and operates as a set of informal businesses. A common result of weak public sector regulation and a fare strategy in which owners claim a fixed daily revenue target and drivers who keep the variable balance as income, is destructive competition and poor quality of service. There is an incontrovertible case for improving the quality, reliability and coverage of public transport systems, and some city governments have attempted to do so by initiating reform projects that envisage the phased replacement of paratransit operations with formalised bus rapid transit systems. In this book the authors argue that there are, however, path dependencies and constraints that limit the possible extent of public transport system reform. Paratransit operations also have some inherent advantages with respect to demand responsiveness and service innovation. Attempts to eradicate paratransit may be neither pragmatic nor strategic. Two future scenarios are likely: hybrid systems comprised of both paratransit and formally planned modes; and systems improved by upgrades and strengthened regulation of existing paratransit services. The business strategies and aspirations of incumbent paratransit operators in three case cities – Cape Town, Dar es Salaam and Nairobi – are discussed, as well as their attitudes towards emerging public transport reform projects. International experiences of hybrid system regulation and paratransit business development are reviewed in order to explore policy options. The authors contend that policies recognising paratransit operators, and seeking contextually appropriate complementarity with formalised planned services, will produce greater benefits than policies ignoring their continued existence.