Photography

Photography

Author: Mary Warner Marien

Publisher: Laurence King Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Photography

Page: 544

View: 674

Here is the history weve been waiting for ... erudite and entertaining ... she shows how pictures really did change our world. Her shrewd selection of over 600 fascinating photos (many in colour) illustrate a history that meets the ultimate test; open to any page and youre hooked ... and its free from tormenting academic jargon. Camera Arts This groundbreaking survey of international photography, which examines the discipline across the full range of its uses by both professionals and amateurs, has been expanded and brought up to date for this second edition. Each of the eight chapters takes a period of up to forty years and examines the medium through the lenses of art, science, social science, travel, war, fashion, the mass media and individual practitioners. These broad topics complement a fully developed cultural context whose emphasis is more on key ideas than individuals. The author also pays close attention to how contemporary practitioners, commentators and beholders have talked about specific works, the nature of photography and the photographers changing role in society.
Photography

Photography

Author: Mary Warner Marien

Publisher: Pearson College Division

ISBN:

Category: Photography

Page: 528

View: 786

For one or two semester courses in History of Photography. Incorporating the latest research and international uses of photography, this text surveys the history of photography in such a way that students can gauge the medium's long-term multifold developments and see the historical and intellectual contexts in which photographers lived and worked. It also provides a unique focus on contemporary photo-based work and electronic media.
History

War and Photography

Author: Caroline Brothers

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 257

Drawing on the work of Barthes, Eco, Foucault, Baudrillard, Burgin and Tagg, and on the historians of mentalities, War and Photography presents a theoretical approach to the understanding of press photography in its historical and contemporary context. Brothers applies her argument with special reference to French and British newspaper images of the Spanish Civil War, a selection of which is presented in the book. Rejecting analyses based upon the content of the images alone, she argues that photographic meaning is largely predetermined by its institutional and cultural context. Acting as witnesses despite themselves, photographs convey a wealth of information not about any objective reality, but about the collective attitudes and beliefs particular to the culture in which they operate.
Photography

Photography and its Critics

Author: Mary Warner Marien

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Photography

Page: 242

View: 845

Photography and its Critics offers an original overview of nineteenth-century American and European writing about photography from such disparate fields as art theory, social reform, and physiology. In this study, Mary Warner Marien argues that photography was an important social and cultural symbol for modernity and change in several fields, such as art and social reform. Moreover, she demonstrates how photography quickly emerged as a pliant symbol for modernity and change, one that could as easily oppose progress as promote democracy.
Photography

Photography and the Cultural History of the Postwar European City

Author: Tom Allbeson

Publisher: Bloomsbury Visual Arts

ISBN:

Category: Photography

Page: 288

View: 687

In 1945, civilians of the cities and towns of postwar Europe faced the daunting task of urban reconstruction and recovery. Through a broad range of case studies, from publicly-circulating aerial photography to press coverage of the opening of UNESCO headquarters, this book explores the impact of urban photography at a critical moment in European architectural history. Tracing how images trafficked between conceptual, media and material spaces in France, Britain and Germany, the book reveals how photography shaped the architecture of each country, reflecting each nation's attitudes to the past and vision of its future. Fascinating reading for historians of visual and urban culture, this is the first volume to analyse how official publications and the illustrated popular press pictured and promoted pivotal ideas and perspectives on the city, nationhood and Western Europe.
Photography

A Staggering Revolution

Author: John Raeburn

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN:

Category: Photography

Page: 424

View: 539

During the 1930s, the world of photography was unsettled, exciting, and boisterous. John Raeburn's A Staggering Revolution recreates the energy of the era by surveying photography's rich variety of innovation, exploring the aesthetic and cultural achievements of its leading figures, and mapping the paths their pictures blazed public's imagination. While other studies of thirties photography have concentrated on the documentary work of the Farm Security Administration (FSA), no previous book has considered it alongside so many of the decade's other important photographic projects. A Staggering Revolution includes individual chapters on Edward Steichen's celebrity portraiture; Berenice Abbott's Changing New York project; the Photo League's ethnography of Harlem; and Edward Weston's western landscapes, made under the auspices of the first Guggenheim Fellowship awarded to a photographer. It also examines Margaret Bourke-White's industrial and documentary pictures, the collective undertakings by California's Group f.64, and the fashion magazine specialists, as well as the activities of the FSA and the Photo League.
Photography

Photography and Cultural Heritage in the Age of Nationalisms

Author: Ewa Manikowska

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Photography

Page: 264

View: 798

This book examines the role of photography as a powerful language of expressing collective identities in Eastern Europe during the period of dramatic socio-political transformation associated with the slow rise of national and ethnic consciousness, the dawn of empire and the outbreak of the two World Wars. From the 1867 All-Russian Ethnographic Exhibition to the war-time Nazi scientific surveys, this innovative account looks closely at how photographic practices and records were applied, borrowed, appropriated, transmitted to exert or subvert power, and used as a tool in negotiating collective identities. Discussing a wide range of little-known archives, libraries of scientific institutions, learned societies, and professional and amateur photographers, it focuses on those ambitious photographic projects which not only shaped the various national, ethnic or imperial identities but also went to the heart of the idea of Eastern Europe. By juxtaposing photography with other visual and non-visual heritage discourses and practices, this book offers both a new perspective in the field of East European studies and a novel approach to the history of photography.
Social history

Tennis

Author: Heiner Gillmeister

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Social history

Page: 599

View: 653

This is the second edition of the highly acclaimed and bestselling comprehensive history of tennis which was the first truly scholarly history of any individual sport. Supported by a startling wealth of linguistic and documentary research, Gillmeister charts the global evolution of tennis from its origins in 12th century France where it emerged as a more peaceful variety of ribald football played in monasteries. By the 16th century, it had become the favourite pastime of the European aristocracy and had, in the wake of the Spanish conquistadors, even reached the Americas. The prestige of the game also led to its popularity among Renaissance poets and playwrights. After a gradual decline in the 18th and 19th centuries the medieval game revived in the 1870s in the form of lawn tennis. The new game dispensed with the expensive walled courts, discarded the complicated rules of the old game and was played in a natural setting. From England with its famous Wimbledon tournament it spread to the European continent and to the United States where the Davis Cup was born. Gillmeister debunks several firmly established myths about the history of the game and rare colour photographs and medieval and renaissance drawings generously adorn the text. A delight for the sports fan and the scholar alike, "Tennis: a cultural history" is the authoritative text on the sport.