History

Pirate Utopias

Author: Peter Lamborn Wilson

Publisher: Autonomedia

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 219

View: 167

'Peter Lamborn Wilson shows why we cherish pirates - and why, for the sake of the future, we must continue to do so. Interesting and compelling...a rollicking, adventurous book.'Marcus Rediker, author, Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea'A chronicler, a historiographer, and a piratologist in the tradition of Defoe...with immense learning and interesting sympathies. His scholarship cuts through the seas of ignorance and prejudice with grace and power.'Peter Linebaugh, author, The London Hanged'One of those rare books which give historians new ideas to think about. It deals with 17th century European converts to Islam - usually but not always as pirates - whose numbers Wilson puts at thousands. His careful analysis of (the) renegadoes, their ideas, and political practice leads to a very tentative suggestion that some of them may have links with Rosicrucianism and the 18th-century Enlightenment...Historians will have to think about this book's novel theme and pursue its implications. Wilson really does turn the world upside down!'Christopher Hill, author, The World Turned Upside DownFrom the 16th to the 19th centuries, Muslim corsairs from the Barbary Coast ravaged European shipping and enslaved thousands of unlucky captives. During this same period, thousands more Europeans converted to Islam and joined the pirate holy war. Were these men (and women) the scum of the seas, apostates, traitors -- Renegadoes? Or did they abandon and betray Christendom as a praxis of social resistance?Peter Lamborn Wilson focuses on the corsairs' most impressive accomplishment, the independent Pirate Republic of Salé, in Morocco, in the 17th century. Corsairs, Sufis, pederasts, "irresistible" Moorish women, slaves, adventures, Irish rebels, heretical Jews, British spies, a Moorish pirate in old New York, and radical working-class heroes all populate a book which intends to entertain and to make a point about insurrectionary communities.
Computers

Crypto Anarchy, Cyberstates, and Pirate Utopias

Author: Peter Ludlow

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 485

View: 734

The book is organized in five sections. The first section considers the sovereignty of the Internet. The second section asks how widespread access to resources such as Pretty Good Privacy and anonymous remailers allows the possibility of "Crypto Anarchy"--Essentially carving out space for activities that lie outside the purview of nation states and other traditional powers. The third section shows how the growth of e-commerce is raising questions of legal jurisdiction and taxation for which the geographic boundaries of nation-states are obsolete. The fourth section looks at specific experimental governance structures evolved by online communities. The fifth section considers utopian and anti-utopian visions for cyberspace.
Fiction

Pirate Utopia

Author: Bruce Sterling

Publisher: Tachyon Publications

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 192

View: 459

Original introduction by Warren Ellis, author of Transmetropolitan and Gun Machine Who are these bold rebels pillaging their European neighbors in the name of revolution? The Futurists! Utopian pirate-warriors of the tiny Regency of Carnaro, unlikely scourge of the Adriatic Sea. Mortal enemies of communists, capitalists, and even fascists (to whom they are not entirely unsympathetic). The ambitious Soldier-Citizens of Carnaro are led by a brilliant and passionate coterie of the perhaps insane. Lorenzo Secondari, World War I veteran, engineering genius, and leader of Croatian raiders. Frau Piffer, Syndicalist manufacturer of torpedos at a factory run by and for women. The Ace of Hearts, a dashing Milanese aristocrat, spymaster, and tactical savant. And the Prophet, a seductive warrior-poet who leads via free love and military ruthlessness. Fresh off of a worldwide demonstration of their might, can the Futurists engage the aid of sinister American traitors and establish world domination?
Islands of the Indian Ocean

Hunting Pirate Heaven

Author: Kevin Rushby

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Islands of the Indian Ocean

Page: 294

View: 816

A chance meeting on the muddy foreshore of the River Thames starts Kevin Rushby on a voyage in search of the lost pirate settlements that once existed on the islands and atolls of the Indian Ocean. Hitching rides on a motley assortment of freighters, dhows, yachts and fishing smacks, he sails up the African coast, then east to the islands of the Comoros and Madagascar. The final objective was to locate the descendants of the sixteenth-century pirates who had carved kingdoms for themselves in the remote jungles of north-east Madagascar. Along his way, Rushby meets the crackpot dreamers, the tough settlers, the fighters and the failures who live on the coasts and islands now. It is a story full of adventure and incident: voyages to islands where forgotten Portuguese forts lie covered in jungle, places where some have tried to shoot their way to paradise, and where the ever-present ocean can destroy lives and dreams as quickly as men and women create them.
History

Hunting Pirate Heaven

Author: Kevin Rushby

Publisher: Walker Books

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 142

Hitching rides on a motley assortment of freighters, dhows, yachts, and fishing smacks, Kevin Rushby sailed up the east coast of Africa in search of the lost pirate settlements that, in the sixteenth century, were established on the islands and atolls in the Indian Ocean. He turned east to the islands of Comoros and Madagascar, his ultimate objective being to locate the descendants of the infamous sixteenth-century pirates—such as Captain Misson, the legendary French pirate who may have been dreamed up by Daniel Defoe; English sailor-turned-buccaneer Thomas White; and Rhode Islander Thomas Tew—who carved kingdoms for themselves in the remote jungles of northeast Madagascar. As he traveled, Rushby met up with the crackpot dreamers, tough settlers, fighters and failures who live on the coasts and islands now—where forgotten Portuguese forts lie covered in jungle, where some have tried to shoot their way to paradise, and where the ocean can destroy lives and dreams as quickly as men and women create them.
History

Life Under the Jolly Roger

Author: Gabriel Kuhn

Publisher: PM Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 265

View: 396

An ideological battle rages over the political legacy and cultural symbolism of the golden age pirates who roamed the seas between the Caribbean islands and the Indian Ocean from 1690 to 1725. One the one hand pirates are romanticised as swash-buckling villains, whilst on the other they are realised as genuine social rebels. LIFE UNDER THE JOLLY ROGER examines the political and cultural significance of these nomadic outlaws by relating historical accounts to a wide range of theoretical concepts - ranging from Marshall Sahlins and Pierre Clastres to Nietzche.
Social Science

Tourist utopias

Author: Tim Simpson

Publisher: Amsterdam University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page:

View: 886

The contributors to this volume theorize and analyse a variety of 'tourist utopias' - a nascent socio-spatial form and set of related practices crucial to a post-industrial, biopolitical global economy. From Disneyworld to Abu Dhabi, Singapore to Macau, 'Middle Earth' to Mount Athos, these sites share common characteristics that include their respective status as enclave 'spaces of exception'; entrepreneurial and neoliberal governance regimes that rely on cooperation among state and non-state actors; transient, multi-national populations of tourists and workers; immaterial and affective forms of labor and consumption; superlative and iconic architecture; and economies devoted to such heterotopian leisure activities as shopping, gambling, spectacle, and amusement. These locales are not only popular destinations for mobile tourists and migrant workers from around the globe, but also serve as cultural laboratories for testing new formats and protocols typical of an emergent post-Fordist form-of-life. NB: CATALOGUSTEKST CHICAGO: From Disneyworld to Abu Dhabi and the resorts and casinos of Singapore and Macau, 'tourist utopias' are a growing part of international capitalism. The book brings together a group of scholars from a wide range of disciplines to analyse these locations as 'spaces of exception, where entrepreneurial and neoliberal governance relies on cooperation among state and non-state actors, as well as transient multinational populations of both workers and consumers. They serve, the contributors argue, as cultural laboratories for testing new protocols for neoliberal governance and capitalist production.
Political Science

Terror and Consent

Author: Philip Bobbitt

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 624

View: 846

Philip Bobbitt follows his magisterial Shield of Achilles with an equally provocative analysis of the West's struggle against terror. Boldly stating that the primary driver of terrorism is not Islam but the emergence of market states (like the U.S. and the E.U.), Bobbitt warns of an era where weapons of mass destruction will be commodified and the wealthiest societies even more vulnerable to destabilizing, demoralizing terror. Unflinching in his analysis, Bobbitt addresses the deepest themes of history, law and strategy.
Philosophy

There's Something about Mary

Author: Frank Jackson

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 463

View: 780

Key papers on one of the most important and provocative thought experiments in philosophy of mind.
Religion

Other

Author: Kester Brewin

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 256

View: 114

Teacher, which is the greatest commandment in the Law?'Jesus replied: '"Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind." This is the first and greatest commandment. And the second is like it: "Love your neighbour as yourself." All the Law and the Prophets hang on these two commandments.' Matthew 22:36-40Noisy neighbours, international terrorism, racism, teenage violence and religious fundamentalism ...from the personal to the local to the international and theological, it is our failure to engage 'the other' that is at the heart of so many of the problems we face. Beginning with Jesus' instruction to love God, and love our neighbour as we love ourselves, Brewin explores how we might better engage 'the other' within the Self, within God and within the worlds we inhabit.Drawing on Brewin's work as a theologian, poet and teacher this accessible and highly original work prompts us to reconsider the key question of 'what kind of selves do we need to be in order to live in harmony with others?
Psychology

Semantics, Tense, and Time

Author: Peter Ludlow

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 280

View: 108

According to Peter Ludlow, there is a very close relation between the structure of natural language and that of reality, and one can gain insights into long-standing metaphysical questions by studying the semantics of natural language. In this book Ludlow uses the metaphysics of time as a case study and focuses on the dispute between A-theorists and B-theorists about the nature of time. According to B-theorists, there is no genuine change, but a permanent sequence of events ordered by an earlier-than/later-than relation. According to the version of the A-theory adopted by Ludlow (a position sometimes called "presentism"), there are no past or future events or times; what makes something past or future is how the world stands right now. Ludlow argues that each metaphysical picture is tied to a particular semantical theory of tense and that the dispute can be adjudicated on semantical grounds. A presentism-compatible semantics, he claims, is superior to a B-theory semantics in a number of respects, including its abilities to handle the indexical nature of temporal discourse and to account for facts about language acquisition. Along the way, Ludlow develops a conception of "E-type" temporal anaphora that can account for both temporal anaphora and complex tenses without reference to past and future events. His view has philosophical consequences for theories of logic, self-knowledge, and memory. As for linguistic consequences, Ludlow suggests that the very idea of grammatical tense may have to be dispensed with and replaced with some combination of aspect, modality, and evidentiality.
Philosophy

T.A.Z.

Author: Hakim Bey

Publisher: Autonomedia

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 147

View: 186

'Who is Hakim Bey? I love him!' Timothy Leary'Exquisite...' Allen Ginsberg'Hard-line dada/surrealism' Rudy Rucker'A Blake angel on bad acid' Robert Anton Wilson'Scares the shit out of us' Church of the SubGeniusThe underground cult bestseller! Essays that redefine the psychogeographical nooks of autonomy. Recipes for poetic terror, anarcho -black magic, post-situ psychotropic surgery, denunciations of spiritual addictions to vapid infotainment cults -- this is the bastard classic, the watermark impressed upon our minds. Where conscience informs praxis, and action infects consciousness, T.A.Z. is beginning to worm its way into above-ground culture.This book offers inspired blasts of writing, from slogans to historical essays, on the need to insert revolutionary happiness into everyday life through poetic action, and celebrating the radical optimism present in outlaw cultures. It should appeal to alternative thinkers and punks everywhere, as it celebrates liberation, love and poetic living.The new edition contains the full text of Chaos: The Broadsheets of Ontological Anarchism, the complete communiques and flyers of the Association fo Ontological Anarchy, the long essay 'The Temporary Autonomous Zone,' and a new preface by the author.'A literary masterpiece...' Freedom'A linguistic romp...' Colin Wilson'Fascinating...' William Burroughs
History

Pirates: A History

Author: Tim Travers

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 470

More than just a history of the real 'pirates of the Caribbean,' Pirates: A History explores piracy from ancient times to the present day, from the bloodthirsty Viking raiders who terrorised northern Europe to the legendary female Chinese pirate of the 1920s, Lai Choi San. In this history we see how thin the line was between a royally chartered privateer and a pirate, most notably epitomised by Francis Drake. Then there were the Renegades: Europeans captured by the Barbary corsairs who converted to Islam and became pirate captains in their own right. Some were simply cut-throat drunkards, but many pirate ships were run on surprisingly progressive, democratic principles. The 'golden age' of piracy is examined afresh and the colourful characters of the era brought to life. Accounts of Blackbeard, Black Barty and William Kidd illustrate the truth behind the legends of the Jolly Roger.
Science

Urban Utopias

Author: Malcolm Miles

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 272

View: 571

Utopia tends to generate a bad press - regarded as impracticable, perhaps nostalgic, or contradictory when visions of a perfect world cannot accommodate the change that is necessary to a free and self-organizing society. But people from diverse backgrounds are currently building a new society within the old, balancing literal and metaphorical utopianism, and demonstrating plural possibilities for alternative futures and types of settlement. Thousands of such places exist around the world, including intentional communities, eco-villages, permaculture plots, religious and secular retreats, co-housing projects, self-build schemes, projects for low-impact housing, and activist squats in urban and rural sites. This experience suggests, however, that when planning and design are not integral to alternative social formations, the modern dream to engineer a new society cannot be realized. The book is structured in four parts. In part one, literary and theoretical utopias from the early modern period to the nineteenth-century are reconsidered. Part two investigates twentieth-century urban utopianism and contemporary alternative settlements focusing on social and environmental issues, activism and eco-village living. Part three looks to wider horizons in recent practices in the non-affluent world, and Part four reviews a range of cases from the author’s visits to specific sites. This is followed by a short conclusion in which a discussion of key issues is resumed. This book brings together insights from literary, theoretical and practical utopias, drawing out the characteristics of groups and places that are part of a new society. It links today’s utopian experiments to historical and literary utopias, and to theoretical problems in utopian thought.
Computers

High Noon on the Electronic Frontier

Author: Peter Ludlow

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 536

View: 297

Collects essays discussing policy issues relating to digital communtication, including property rights, hacking, privacy, and freedom of speech
History

British Pirates and Society, 1680-1730

Author: Margarette Lincoln

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 286

View: 538

This book shows how pirates were portrayed in their own time, in trial reports, popular prints, novels, legal documents, sermons, ballads and newspaper accounts. It examines how attitudes towards them changed with Britain’s growing imperial power, exploring the interface between political ambition and personal greed, between civil liberties and the power of the state. It throws light on contemporary ideals of leadership and masculinity - some pirate voyages qualifying as feats of seamanship and endurance. Unusually, it also gives insights into the domestic life of pirates and investigates the experiences of women whose husbands turned pirate or were captured for piracy. Pirate voyages contributed to British understanding of trans-oceanic navigation, patterns of trade and different peoples in remote parts of the world. This knowledge advanced imperial expansion and British control of trade routes, which helps to explain why contemporary attitudes towards piracy were often ambivalent. This is an engaging study of vested interests and conflicting ideologies. It offers comparisons with our experience of piracy today and shows how the historic representation of pirate behaviour can illuminate other modern preoccupations, including gang culture.
History

Pirate Hunting

Author: Benerson Little

Publisher: Potomac Books, Inc.

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 376

View: 194

For thousands of years pirates, privateers, and seafaring raiders have terrorized the ocean voyager and coastal inhabitant, plundering ship and shore with impunity. From the victim's point of view, these attackers were not the rebellious, romantic rulers of Neptune's realm, but savage beasts to be eradicated, and those who went to sea to stop them were heroes. Engaging and meticulously detailed, Pirate Hunting chronicles the fight against these plunderers from ancient times to the present and illustrates the array of tactics and strategies that individuals and governments have employed to secure the seas. Benerson Little lends further dimension to this unending battle by including the history of piracy and privateering, ranging from the Mycenaean rovers to the modern pirates of Somalia. He also introduces associated naval warfare; maritime commerce and transportation; the development of speed under oar, sail, and steam; and the evolution of weaponry. More than just a vivid account of the war that seafarers and pirates have waged, Pirate Hunting is invaluable reading in a world where acts of piracy are once more a significant threat to maritime commerce and voyagers. It will appeal to readers interested in the history of piracy, anti-piracy operations, and maritime, naval, and military history worldwide.
Social Science

Subcultures

Author: Ken Gelder

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 200

View: 543

This book presents a cultural history of subcultures, covering a remarkable range of subcultural forms and practices. It begins with London’s ‘Elizabethan underworld’, taking the rogue and vagabond as subcultural prototypes: the basis for Marx’s later view of subcultures as the lumpenproletariat, and Henry Mayhew’s view of subcultures as ‘those that will not work’. Subcultures are always in some way non-conforming or dissenting. They are social - with their own shared conventions, values, rituals, and so on – but they can also seem ‘immersed’ or self-absorbed. This book identifies six key ways in which subcultures have generally been understood: through their often negative relation to work: idle, parasitical, hedonistic, criminal their negative or ambivalent relation to class their association with territory - the ‘street’, the ‘hood’, the club - rather than property their movement away from home into non-domestic forms of ‘belonging’ their ties to excess and exaggeration (as opposed to restraint and moderation) their refusal of the banalities of ordinary life and in particular, of massification. Subcultures looks at the way these features find expression across many different subcultural groups: from the Ranters to the riot grrrls, from taxi dancers to drag queens and kings, from bebop to hip hop, from dandies to punk, from hobos to leatherfolk, and from hippies and bohemians to digital pirates and virtual communities. It argues that subcultural identity is primarily a matter of narrative and narration, which means that its focus is literary as well as sociological. It also argues for the idea of a subcultural geography: that subcultures inhabit places in particular ways, their investment in them being as much imaginary as real and, in some cases, strikingly utopian.
Literary Criticism

Herman Melville and the Politics of the Inhuman

Author: Michael Jonik

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 736

Studies of the writing of Herman Melville are often divided among those that address his political, historical, or biographical dimensions and those that offer creative theoretical readings of his texts. In Herman Melville and the Politics of the Inhuman, Michael Jonik offers a series of nuanced and ambitious philosophical readings of Melville that unite these varied approaches. Through a careful reconstruction of Melville's interaction with philosophy, Jonik argues that Melville develops a notion of the 'inhuman' after Spinoza's radically non-anthropocentric and relational thought. Melville's own political philosophy, in turn, actively disassembles differences between humans and nonhumans, and the animate and inanimate. Jonik has us rethink not only how we read Melville, but also how we understand our deeply inhuman condition.