Antiques & Collectibles

Pottery from Spanish Shipwrecks, 1500-1800

Author: Mitchell W. Marken

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Antiques & Collectibles

Page: 264

View: 735

"A classic whose quality will meet the test of time. No doubt this book will become a standard reference for students of the early modern archaeology of the Spanish empire, be their focus under the ground or under the sea."--Russell Skowronek, Santa Clara University "An important new archaeological approach. . . . To date, archaeologists have paid little systematic attention to [artifact collections recovered from shipwreck sites]. Marken's book demonstrates that this is a resource that simply cannot be ignored."--Lynn Harris, Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of South Carolina With this original and comprehensive analysis of Spanish pottery, a large collection of securely dated examples recovered from shipwrecks appears in print for the first time. Because wrecks provide solid dates and a quantity of artifacts that far exceeds the number normally found on land sites, significant new generalizations now can be made about the role of pottery in the period of the Spanish empire. Marken focuses on olive jars and tableware, the common pottery of the seaman and the everyday colonist. Heavily illustrated with drawings and photographs, this book will help create more accurate typologies and terminologies for these wares. Without condoning the practice of treasure hunting, Marken decided to incorporate finds from legally salvaged wrecks: "There is no question that scientific, archaeological investigation of shipwrecks brings us closer to answering the real questions about people," he writes. "Ignoring the legally recovered artifacts has left archaeologists years behind in better understanding certain aspects of Spanish material culture. It is within this framework of 'rescue archaeology' that my work was undertaken, in the firm belief that much of the material I was able to record would be unavailable for study a generation hence." Marken analyzes collections from eighteen shipwrecks that are housed in Britain, Bermuda, the Caribbean basin, and the states of Louisiana, Texas, and Florida. The ships were primarily engaged in trade with the New World or were transports and warships of the Spanish Armada. He discusses the origins of the ships, shipwreck sites, and events surrounding each wreck. Mitchell W. Marken received his Ph.D. from the University of St. Andrews, Scotland, and is currently a project manager for Mariah Associates, Inc., in Reno, Nevada. He consults frequently on shipwrecks and other submerged site projects such as UCLA/RAINPEG in Guatemala, the USS Somers in Mexico, and the Lock Tay Crannog, a submerged Bronze Age site in Scotland. He is currently producing a twenty-part television series entitled "Shipwreck Discoveries."
Social Science

Oceans Odyssey 3. The Deep-Sea Tortugas Shipwreck, Straits of Florida

Author: Sean A. Kingsley

Publisher: Oxbow Books

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 201

View: 420

In 1990 Seahawk Deep Ocean Technology of Tampa, Florida, commenced the world’s first robotic archaeological excavation of a deep-sea shipwreck south of the Tortugas Islands in the Straits of Florida. At a depth of 405 meters, 16,903 artefacts were recovered using a Remotely-Operated Vehicle. The wreck is interpreted as the Buen Jesús y Nuestra Señora del Rosario, a small Portuguese-built and Spanish-operated merchant vessel from the 1622 Tierra Firme fleet returning to Seville from Venezuela’s Pearl Coast when lost in a hurricane. Oceans Odyssey 3 introduces the shipwreck and its artefact collection – today owned and curated by Odyssey Marine Exploration – ranging from gold bars to silver coins, pearls, ceramics, beads, glass wares, astrolabes, tortoiseshell, animal bones and seeds. The Tortugas shipwreck reflects the daily life of trade with the Americas at the end of the Golden Age of Spain and presents the capabilities of deep-sea robotics as tools for precision archaeological excavation.
Social Science

International Handbook of Historical Archaeology

Author: Teresita Majewski

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 698

View: 285

In studying the past, archaeologists have focused on the material remains of our ancestors. Prehistorians generally have only artifacts to study and rely on the diverse material record for their understanding of past societies and their behavior. Those involved in studying historically documented cultures not only have extensive material remains but also contemporary texts, images, and a range of investigative technologies to enable them to build a broader and more reflexive picture of how past societies, communities, and individuals operated and behaved. Increasingly, historical archaeology refers not to a particular period, place, or a method, but rather an approach that interrogates the tensions between artifacts and texts irrespective of context. In short, historical archaeology provides direct evidence for how humans have shaped the world we live in today. Historical archaeology is a branch of global archaeology that has grown in the last 40 years from its North American base into an increasingly global community of archaeologists each studying their area of the world in a historical context. Where historical archaeology started as part of the study of the post-Columbian societies of the United States and Canada, it has now expanded to interface with the post-medieval archaeologies of Europe and the diverse post-imperial experiences of Africa, Latin America, and Australasia. The 36 essays in the International Handbook of Historical Archaeology have been specially commissioned from the leading researchers in their fields, creating a wide-ranging digest of the increasingly global field of historical archaeology. The volume is divided into two sections, the first reviewing the key themes, issues, and approaches of historical archaeology today, and the second containing a series of case studies charting the development and current state of historical archaeological practice around the world. This key reference work captures the energy and diversity of this global discipline today.
History

Shipwrecks of Florida

Author: Steven D Singer

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 966

Over 2,100 shipwrecks from the 16th century to the present; the most comprehensive listing now available. Wrecks are arranged primarily by geographical section of the state. Within sections, wrecks are arranged chronologically. Extensive and heavily illustrated appendices offer a wealth of information on topics of interest to divers and researchers alike. A companion volume, More Shipwrecks of Florida, is now available from Pineapple Press.
Art

Cerámica Y Cultura

Author: Museum of International Folk Art (N.M.)

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 356

View: 696

By examining both historic and contemporary examples, the editors move discussion of the enameled earthenware known as mayA3lica beyond its stylistic merits in order to understand it in historic and cultural context. It places the ceramics in history and daily life, illustrating their place in trade and economics.
Caribbean Area

Caribbean Abstracts

Author: Koninklijk Instituut voor Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde (Netherlands). Caraïbische Afdeling

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Caribbean Area

Page:

View: 339

Academic libraries

Choice

Author:

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Category: Academic libraries

Page:

View: 775

Social Science

Mediterranean Pottery in Wessex Households

Author: Alejandra Gutiérrez

Publisher: British Archaeological Reports Limited

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 257

View: 154

A detailed analysis of the archaeological and historical evidence for the trade and consumption of Mediterranean pottery in the households of southern England between 1200 and 1700. Following a discussion of methodologies, Gutierrez considers Mediterranean centres of production for imported pottery, notably in Spain, Portugal and Italy, followed by a discussion of the archaeological evidence for contact between Wessex and the Mediterranean. A wide range of sites are examined, including fortified and religious buildings, urban and rural settlements and palaces. The study finally examines the types of Mediterranean assemblages found and their social and religious context.
Maritime archaeology

Encyclopaedia of Underwater and Maritime Archaeology

Author: James P. Delgado

Publisher: London : British Museum Press

ISBN:

Category: Maritime archaeology

Page: 493

View: 953

The theory and practice of underwater archaeology includes nearly every archaeological discipline from prehistoric archaeology to the modern era.
American literature

Cumulative Book Index

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Category: American literature

Page:

View: 265

A world list of books in the English language.
Social Science

Household Ceramics at Port Royal, Jamaica, 1655-1692

Author: Madeleine J. Donachie

Publisher: British Archaeological Reports Limited

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 167

View: 547

In 1692 an earthquake destroyed and submerged half of the Jamaican city of Port Royal, a thriving and prosperous commercial centre in the late 17th century. From 1981 to 1990 the Institute of Nautical Archaeology and the Texas A & M University in conjunction with the Jamaican National Heritage Trust conducted an underwater excavation of the city's remains. This volume publishes some of the ceramic data from the site, namely Building 4/5 which Donachie identifies as a possible inn or restaurant. The different types of ceramics present, from coarsewares to porcelain, their quantities and function, are discussed with a view to reconstructing the social activities taking place in the building as well as allowing inferences on the standard of living and customs of the city as a whole. Comparative material from two contemporary non-Jamaican sites are discussed and the assemblage is placed within the context of British and local pottery production during this period.