History

Uncertain Futures

Author: Senia Paseta

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 387

This volume has been produced to mark the retirement of Roy Foster from the Carroll Professorship of Irish history at the University of Oxford, and to mark his extraordinary career as a historian, literary critic, and public intellectual. It consists of twenty three essays contributed by many of the leading historians of modern Ireland, including scholars whose work has influenced Roy Foster's own research, leading Irish historians who have influenced and have been influenced by Foster, and younger scholars who were supervised and/or mentored by Roy and whose work he greatly admires. Essays chart Foster's career while reflecting on developments in the field of Irish history writing, teaching, and research since the 1970s. Focussing on the history of Ireland since 1800, these essays cover a wide spectrum of topics and ideas including aspects of the Irish land question, generational and intellectual tensions, political biography, and social and cultural change.

Uncertain Futures

Author: Senia Paseta

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 320

View: 353

This volume has been produced to mark the retirement of Roy Foster from the Carroll Professorship of Irish history at the University of Oxford, and to mark his extraordinary career as a historian, literary critic, and public intellectual. It consists of twenty three essays contributed by many of the leading historians of modern Ireland, including scholars whose work has influenced Roy Foster's own research, leading Irish historians who have influenced and have been influenced by Foster, and younger scholars who were supervised and/or mentored by Roy and whose work he greatly admires. Essays chart Foster's career while reflecting on developments in the field of Irish history writing, teaching, and research since the 1970s. Focussing on the history of Ireland since 1800, these essays cover a wide spectrum of topics and ideas including aspects of the Irish land question, generational and intellectual tensions, political biography, and social and cultural change.
Philosophy

The Cambridge Companion to Plato

Author: Richard Kraut

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 560

View: 566

Fourteen new essays discuss Plato's views about knowledge, reality, mathematics, politics, ethics, love, poetry, and religion in a convenient, accessible guide that analyzes the intellectual and social background of his thought as well.
Philosophy

Dictionary of Twentieth-Century British Philosophers

Author: Stuart Brown

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 1220

View: 696

This is a two-volume work with entries on individuals who made some contribution to philosophy in the period 1900 to 1960 or soon after. The entries deal with the whole philosophical work of an individual or, in the case of philosophers still living, their whole work to date. Typically the individuals included have been born by 1935 and by now have made their main contributions. Contributions to the subject typically take the form of books or journal articles, but influential teachers and people otherwise important in the world of philosophy may also be included. The dictionary includes amateurs as well as professional philosophers and, where appropriate, thinkers whose main discipline was outside philosophy. There are special problems about the term "British" in the twentieth century, partly because of human migration, partly because of decolonialization and the changing denotation of the term. The intention has been to include not only those who were British subjects at least for a significant part of their lives (even if they mostly lived outside what is now the U.K.) but also people who spent a significant part of their lives in Britain itself, irrespective of their nationality or country of origin. In the first category are included, for instance, a number of people who were born and educated in Britain but who subsequently taught in universities abroad. In the second category are included those who were born elsewhere but who came to Britain and contributed to its philosophical culture.
Literary Criticism

Guide to British Drama Explication: Beginnings to 1640

Author: Krystan V. Douglas

Publisher: Macmillan Reference USA

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 552

View: 743

Lists English language works on explication of British drama written up to 1640, as well as the plays of John Milton, organized alphabetically by dramatists' last names, with plays listed under the name of each collaborator in the case of multiple authors. Works involve a close reading of the drama and focus on specific passages from the text, and represent approaches from the New Criticism to Semiotics and the New Historicism. Annotation copyright by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR
History

Religion, Identity and Conflict in Britain: From the Restoration to the Twentieth Century

Author: Frances Knight

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 294

View: 827

The British state between the mid-seventeenth century to the early twentieth century was essentially a Christian state. Christianity permeated society, defining the rites of passage - baptism, first communion, marriage and burial - that shaped individual lives, providing a sense of continuity between past, present and future generations, and informing social institutions and voluntary associations. Yet this religious conception of state and society was also the source of conflict. The Restoration of the monarchy in 1660 brought limited toleration for Protestant Dissenters, who felt unable to worship in the established Church, and there were challenges to faith raised by biblical and historical scholarship, science, moral questioning and social dislocations and unrest. This book brings together a distinguished team of authors who explore the interactions of religion, politics and culture that shaped and defined modern Britain. They consider expressions of civic consciousness in the expanding towns and cities, the growth of Welsh national identity, movements for popular education and temperance reform, and the influence of organised sport, popular journalism, and historical writing in defining national life. Most importantly, the contributors highlight the vital role of religious faith and religious institutions in the understanding of the modern British state.
History

Three Men in a Boat

Author: David Dumville

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 64

View: 602

This is the text of the Inaugural Lecture of the first Professor of Palaeography in the history of the University of Cambridge. It contains an account of the institutional provision for the subject since 1892, and illustrates the interaction of manuscript-studies with those of history, language, and literature by discussing the role played by Gaelic ecclesiastical exiles in continental Europe - and especially in central Europe - in the ninth century. The interrelationships of a series of multilingual manuscripts, written mostly by Irish ecclesiastics, provides the principal evidence for this study of an important aspect of intellectual creativity and transmission of knowledge in the Carolingian world.
Law

Constituting Empire

Author: Daniel J. Hulsebosch

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 496

View: 320

According to the traditional understanding of American constitutional law, the Revolution produced a new conception of the constitution as a set of restrictions on the power of the state rather than a mere description of governmental roles. Daniel J. Hulsebosch complicates this viewpoint by arguing that American ideas of constitutions were based on British ones and that, in New York, those ideas evolved over the long eighteenth century as New York moved from the periphery of the British Atlantic empire to the center of a new continental empire. Hulsebosch explains how colonists and administrators reconfigured British legal sources to suit their needs in an expanding empire. In this story, familiar characters such as Alexander Hamilton and James Kent appear in a new light as among the nation's most important framers, and forgotten loyalists such as Superintendent of Indian Affairs Sir William Johnson and lawyer William Smith Jr. are rightly returned to places of prominence. In his paradigm-shifting analysis, Hulsebosch captures the essential paradox at the heart of American constitutional history: the Revolution, which brought political independence and substituted the people for the British crown as the source of legitimate authority, also led to the establishment of a newly powerful constitution and a new postcolonial genre of constitutional law that would have been the envy of the British imperial agents who had struggled to govern the colonies before the Revolution.
Business & Economics

Thoughtful Economic Man

Author: J. Gay Tulip Meeks

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 160

View: 551

An authoritative examination of the implications of conventional conceptions of rational economic man for all economic study as well as the role of rationality and morals in economics.
Literary Criticism

Influence and Intertextuality in Literary History

Author: John B Clayton

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 349

View: 923

This collection explores and clarifies two of the most contested ideas in literary theory - influence and intertextuality. The study of influence tends to centre on major authors and canonical works, identifying prior documents as sources or contexts for a given author. Intertextuality, on the other hand, is a concept unconcerned with authors as individuals; it treats all texts as part of a network of discourse that includes culture, history and social practices as well as other literary works. In thirteen essays drawing on the entire spectrum of English and American literary history, this volume considers the relationship between these two terms across the whole range of their usage.
Language Arts & Disciplines

Meaning, Knowledge, and Reality

Author: John Henry McDowell

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 462

View: 569

This is the second volume of John McDowell's selected papers. These 19 essays collectively report on McDowell's involvement with questions about the interface between the philosophies of language and mind and with issues in general epistemology.
Political Science

The Dissidents

Author: Peter Reddaway

Publisher: Brookings Institution Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 320

View: 236

The nearly forgotten story of Soviet dissidents It has been nearly three decades since the collapse of the Soviet Union—enough time for the role that the courageous dissidents ultimately contributed to the communist system’s collapse to have been largely forgotten, especially in the West. This book brings to life, for contemporary readers, the often underground work of the men and women who opposed the regime and authored dissident texts, known as samizdat, that exposed the tyrannies and weaknesses of the Soviet state both inside and outside the country. Peter Reddaway spent decades studying the Soviet Union and got to know these dissidents and their work, publicizing their writings in the West and helping some of them to escape the Soviet Union and settle abroad. In this memoir he captures the human costs of the repression that marked the Soviet state, focusing in particular on Pavel Litvinov, Larisa Bogoraz, General Petro Grigorenko, Anatoly Marchenko, Alexander Podrabinek, Vyacheslav Bakhmin, and Andrei Sinyavsky. His book describes their courage but also puts their work in the context of the power struggles in the Kremlin, where politicians competed with and even succeeded in ousting one another. Reddaway’s book takes readers beyond Moscow, describing politics and dissident work in other major Russian cities as well as in the outlying republics.
Literary Collections

The Old English Version of Bede's Historia Ecclesiastica

Author: Sharon M. Rowley

Publisher: Boydell & Brewer Ltd

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 257

View: 905

Pioneering examination of the Old English version of Bede's Historia ecclesiastica and its reception in the middle ages, from a theoretically informed, multi-disciplinary perspective.
History

Ireland and the Federal Solution

Author: John Kendle

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 729

The debate over internal constitutional change took place at a time when many people were concerned about relations between Great Britain and the self-governing colonies. The issue of Imperial federation was continuously and exhaustively discussed and promoted from the late 1860s through World War I. The waters became so muddied that at times it has been difficult to separate arguments for closer imperial union from proposals for internal decentralization. Kendle comments extensively on this confusion. During the fifty years from the early 1870s to the establishment of the Irish Free State in 1922, politicians and publicists devoted considerable energy and attention to the notions of "home rule all round," "devolution," and "federalism" as possible means of resolving the urgent political, administrative, and constitutional issues confronting the United Kingdom. The increasing complexity of government business, the gathering forces of ethnic nationalism in Ireland, Scotland, and Wales, and concern with maintaining and strengthening the role of the parliament at Westminister in imperial affairs combined to keep the possibility of decentralization at the forefront of political and public debate. Kendle explores and analyzes the motives and attitudes of participants in this debate and looks at the schemes and proposals that resulted from this power struggle. Ireland and the Federal Solution gives a lucid appraisal of what was meant at the time by the terms "federalism," "home rule all round," and "devolution" and evaluates how firmly the participants grasped the constitutional similarities and differences between existing federal systems.
Literary Criticism

Textual Criticism and Middle English Texts

Author: Tim William Machan

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 250

View: 440

Textual-Critical studies of medieval English literature have primarily focused on practical matters such as transcription, collation, recension, and the identification of scribal hands. But the theory of editing medieval English works remains largely unexplored. Tim William Machan addresses this void by setting out to articulate the textual and cultural factors that distinctively characterize Middle English works as Middle English and to reveal the role these factors play in editing and interpretation of these works. In revealing how the creation of textual criticism affected the transmission of Middle English, this book will be of interest and accessible to readers relatively new to both textual criticism and Middle English. It will also be of vital importance to specialists in medieval studies, Renaissance studies, and textual criticism.
Biography & Autobiography

The Polymath

Author: Peter Burke

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 352

View: 510

The first history of the western polymath, from the fifteenth century to the present day From Leonardo Da Vinci to John Dee and Comenius, from George Eliot to Oliver Sacks and Susan Sontag, polymaths have moved the frontiers of knowledge in countless ways. But history can be unkind to scholars with such encyclopaedic interests. All too often these individuals are remembered for just one part of their valuable achievements. In this engaging, erudite account, renowned cultural historian Peter Burke argues for a more rounded view. Identifying 500 western polymaths, Burke explores their wide-ranging successes and shows how their rise matched a rapid growth of knowledge in the age of the invention of printing, the discovery of the New World and the Scientific Revolution. It is only more recently that the further acceleration of knowledge has led to increased specialisation and to an environment that is less supportive of wide-ranging scholars and scientists. Spanning the Renaissance to the present day, Burke changes our understanding of this remarkable intellectual species.
Literary Criticism

How the Anglo-Saxons Read Their Poems

Author: Daniel Donoghue

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 248

View: 942

The scribes of early medieval England wrote out their vernacular poems using a format that looks primitive to our eyes because it lacks the familiar visual cues of verse lineation, marks of punctuation, and capital letters. The paradox is that scribes had those tools at their disposal, which they deployed in other kinds of writing, but when it came to their vernacular poems they turned to a sparser presentation. How could they afford to be so indifferent? The answer lies in the expertise that Anglo-Saxon readers brought to the task. From a lifelong immersion in a tradition of oral poetics they acquired a sophisticated yet intuitive understanding of verse conventions, such that when their eyes scanned the lines written out margin-to-margin, they could pinpoint with ease such features as alliteration, metrical units, and clause boundaries, because those features are interwoven in the poetic text itself. Such holistic reading practices find a surprising source of support in present-day eye-movement studies, which track the complex choreography between eye and brain and show, for example, how the minimal punctuation in manuscripts snaps into focus when viewed as part of a comprehensive system. How the Anglo-Saxons Read Their Poems uncovers a sophisticated collaboration between scribes and the earliest readers of poems like Beowulf, The Wanderer, and The Dream of the Rood. In addressing a basic question that no previous study has adequately answered, it pursues an ambitious synthesis of a number of fields usually kept separate: oral theory, paleography, syntax, and prosody. To these philological topics Daniel Donoghue adds insights from the growing field of cognitive psychology. According to Donoghue, the earliest readers of Old English poems deployed a unique set of skills that enabled them to navigate a daunting task with apparent ease. For them reading was both a matter of technical proficiency and a social practice.
History

Survey of Jewish Affairs, 1987

Author: William Frankel

Publisher: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 301

View: 263

Addresses major issues of concern about Israel, the Middle East, the United States, and world Jewry during the year 1986, such as the vulnerability and successes of the National Unity Government, the peace process, the Arab League, American Middle East policy, the Waldheim issue, and world Jewish fundamentalism. Contains a chronology of major events of 1985 and 1986.
History

Hugh Trevor-Roper

Author: Blair Worden

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 884

Hugh Trevor-Roper was one of the most gifted historians of the twentieth century. His scholarly interests ranged widely - from the Puritan Revolution to the Scottish Enlightenment. Yet he was also fascinated by the events of his own lifetime and wrote widely on issues of espionage and intelligence, as well as maintaining a fascination with the workings - and personalities - of Nazi Germany. In this volume, a variety of contributors - many of whom knew Trevor-Roper personally - engage with his scholarship and analyse his greatest achievements as an historian. Covering the full range of Trevor-Roper's interests, this volume will be essential for anyone who wishes to better understand this great historian and his work.