Language Arts & Disciplines

Proto-Slavic Inflectional Morphology

Author: Thomas Olander

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 426

View: 602

In this volume, Thomas Olander offers a historical analysis of the inflectional endings of Proto-Slavic, comparing them with the corresponding endings in related languages and reconstructing the Proto-Indo-European point of departure.
Language Arts & Disciplines

Handbook of Comparative and Historical Indo-European Linguistics

Author: Jared Klein

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 1025

View: 891

This book presents the most comprehensive coverage of the field of Indo-European Linguistics in a century, focusing on the entire Indo-European family and treating each major branch and most minor languages. The collaborative work of 120 scholars from 22 countries, Handbook of Comparative and Historical Indo-European Linguistics combines the exhaustive coverage of an encyclopedia with the in-depth treatment of individual monographic studies.
Language Arts & Disciplines

Understanding Morphological Rules

Author: Stela Manova

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 240

View: 424

This volume analyzes morphological and morphonological phenomena from a number of distinct Slavic languages. It does so in an innovative manner, yet also positions the analysis in the context of current morphological debates. It is thus a valuable contribution both to comparative Slavic morphology and general morphological theory. Moreover, the book is the first attempt at a theory of conversion and subtraction relevant to languages with rich inflectional morphology. It contributes to our structural understanding of the nature of word. As the first illustration of subtraction with examples from southern Slavic languages, it is an excellent source of specialist data. The book’s theoretical framework is easily accessible and applicable to other languages, which makes it attractive to researchers on Slavic languages and general linguists alike. The volume will also appeal to general morphologists, typologists, and advanced students in linguistics.
Language Arts & Disciplines

The Prehistory of the Balto-Slavic Accent

Author: Jay Jasanoff

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 284

View: 793

In The Prehistory of the Balto-Slavic Accent Jay Jasanoff offers a much-needed guide to the accentual changes that set Baltic and Slavic apart from the rest of the Indo-European family.
Language Arts & Disciplines

All Things Morphology

Author: Sedigheh Moradi

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing Company

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 439

View: 561

This book provides a view of where the field of morphology has been and where it is today within a particular theoretical framework, gathering up new and representative work in morphology by both eminent and emerging scholars, and touching on a very wide range of topics, approaches, and theoretical points of view. These seemingly disparate articles have a common touchstone in their focus on a word-based, paradigmatic approach to morphology. The chapters in this book elaborate on these basic themes, from the further exploration of paradigms, to studies involving words, stems, and affixes, to examinations of competition, inheritance, and defaults, to investigations of morphomes, to ways that morphology interacts with other parts of the language from phonology to sociolinguistics and applied linguistics. The editors and contributors dedicate this volume to Prof. Mark Aronoff for his profound influence on the field.
Foreign Language Study

The Indo-European Languages

Author: Mate Kapović

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 630

View: 489

The Indo-European Languages presents a comprehensive survey of the individual languages and language subgroups within this language family. With over four hundred languages and dialects and almost three billion native speakers, the Indo-European language family is the largest of the recognized language groups and includes most of the major current languages of Europe, the Iranian plateau and the Indian subcontinent. Written by an international team of experts, this comprehensive, single-volume tome presents in-depth discussions of the historical development and specialized linguistic features of the Indo-European languages. This unique resource remains the ideal reference for advanced undergraduate and postgraduate students of Indo-European linguistics and languages, but also for more experienced researchers looking for an up-to-date survey of separate Indo-European branches. It will be of interest to researchers and anyone with an interest in historical linguistics, linguistic anthropology and language development.
Language Arts & Disciplines

Causatives and Transitivity

Author: Bernard Comrie

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 399

View: 890

This volume brings together 18 typological studies of causative and related constructions (transitivity, voice, other expressions of cause) by 19 scholars from North America, Western Europe, and Russia. The inspirations for the volume is the pioneering work on causative constructions by the Leningrad Typology Group; several of the contributors have close connections to the charter members of that group, others have appreciated this work from a distance. The volume as a whole is based on the concept of causative constructions as embracing both morphology and syntax, with an important semantic component as well. In addition to general studies concerning the morpho syntactic and semantic typology and the history of causative constructions and relations to other phenomena, the following individual languages are treated in detail: Russian, English, Dutch, Svan, Even, Korean, Yukaghir, Alutor, Aleut, Haruai, Dogon, Athabaskan languages. The volume will be of interest to typologists, to other linguists interested in causative constructions and transitivity relations, and to all who are interested in the linguistic expression of causal relations.
Language Arts & Disciplines

Source Book for Linguistics

Author: William Cowan

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 250

View: 734

This is a revised and expanded edition of Cowan and Rakušan’s Source Book for Linguistics. In addition to the chapters on Phonetics, Phonology, Phonological Alternations, Morphology, Syntax, Sound Change and Historical Reconstruction, there are two new chapters: one on Semantics and one on Grammatical and Lexical Change. In addition, an index of the 93 languages and dialects represented in the book has been added, as well as a revised bibliography. The solutions to the exercises have also been revised and expanded. The number of exercises has been increased from 333 to 472. New exercises have been added to most chapters, and many exercises have been revised to focus on new issues in linguistics. The text has been completely reset in high-quality letterpress, with a wide range of phonetic symbols and diacritics. This newly revised edition will continue to be useful as a teaching tool and a source of examples in a variety of linguistic applications. If you’ve been teaching upper-level undergraduate introductions to linguistics without Cowan & Rakusan, then you’ve been scrambling about in search of examples and exercises in phonetics, phonology, morphology and syntax long enough. Order the Source Book; in the long run, if it does for you what it did for me, you’ll probably wind up just dumping your traditional textbook order. (Lynn Eubank, University of North Texas)
Language Arts & Disciplines

Perspectives on Language Structure and Language Change

Author: Lars Heltoft

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing Company

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 419

View: 208

This volume centers on three important theoretical concepts for the study of language change and the ways in which language structure emerges and turns into new structure: reanalysis, actualization, and indexicality. Reanalysis is a part of ongoing everyday language use, a process through which language is reproduced and changed. Actualization refers to the processes through which a reanalyzed structure spreads throughout single communities and society. Indexicality covers the way in which parts of a linguistic system can point to other parts of the system, both syntagmatically and paradigmatically. The inclusion of indexicality leads to fine-grained analysis in morphology, word order, and constructional syntax.
History

Tracing the Indo-Europeans

Author: Birgit Anette Olsen

Publisher: Oxbow Books

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 218

Recent developments in aDNA has reshaped our understanding of later European prehistory, and at the same time also opened up for more fruitful collaborations between archaeologists and historical linguists. Two revolutionary genetic studies, published independently in Nature, 2015, showed that prehistoric Europe underwent two successive waves of migration, one from Anatolia consistent with the introduction of agriculture, and a later influx from the Pontic-Caspian steppes which without any reasonable doubt pinpoints the archaeological Yamnaya complex as the cradle of (Core-)Indo-European languages. Now, for the first time, when the preliminaries are clear, it is possible for the fields of genetics, archaeology and historical linguistics to cooperate in a constructive fashion to refine our knowledge of the Indo-European homeland, migrations, society and language. For the historical-comparative linguists, this opens up a wealth of exciting perspectives and new working fields in the intersections between linguistics and neighbouring disciplines, for the archaeologists and geneticists, on the other hand, the linguistic contributions help to endow the material findings with a voice from the past. The present selection of papers illustrate the importance of an open interdisciplinary discussion which will gradually help us in our quest of Tracing the Indo-Europeans.
Language Arts & Disciplines

The Oxford Handbook of Grammatical Number

Author: Patricia Cabredo Hofherr

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 752

View: 402

This volume offers detailed accounts of current research in grammatical number in language. Following a detailed introduction, the chapters in the first three parts of the book explore the multiple research questions in the field and the complex problems surrounding the analysis of grammatical number: Part I presents the background and foundational notions, Part II the morphological, semantic, and syntactic aspects, and Part III the different means of expressing plurality in the event domain. The final part offers fifteen case studies that include in-depth discussion of grammatical number phenomena in a range of typologically diverse languages, written by - or in collaboration with - native speakers linguists or based on extensive fieldwork. The volume draws on work from a range of subdisciplines - including morphology, syntax, semantics, and psycholinguistics - and will be a valuable resource for students and scholars in all areas of theoretical, descriptive, and experimental linguistics.
Proto-Slavic language

Common Slavic

Author: Henrik Birnbaum

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Proto-Slavic language

Page: 436

View: 437

"Common Slavic: Progress and Problems in its Reconstruction is an extraordinarily valuable annotated literature review. It is dated only in the sense that the literature surveyed is now fifty years older. There is nothing dated about the commentary on the literature, and given the relatively moderated pace of progress in historical Slavic linguistics in this era of intense focus on linguistic theory, a substantial portion of the material surveyed in this book is still state of the art with respect to our understanding of the historical comparative problems."--Site web de l'éditeur.
Foreign Language Study

Origins of the Greek Verb

Author: Andreas Willi

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page:

View: 419

Situated at the crossroads of comparative philology, classics and general historical linguistics, this study is the first ever attempt to outline in full the developments which led from the remotest recoverable stages of the Indo-European proto-language to the complex verbal system encountered in Homer and other early Greek texts. By combining the methods of comparative and internal reconstruction with a careful examination of large collections of primary data and insights gained from the study of language change and linguistic typology, Andreas Willi uncovers the deeper reasons behind many surface irregularities and offers a new understanding of how categories such as aspect, tense and voice interact. Drawing upon evidence from all major branches of Indo-European, and providing exhaustive critical coverage of scholarly debate on the most controversial issues, this book will be an essential reference tool for anyone seeking orientation in this burgeoning but increasingly fragmented area of linguistic research.
Language Arts & Disciplines

Principles of Syntactic Reconstruction

Author: Gisella Ferraresi

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 219

View: 820

This is a collection of state-of-the-art papers in the field of syntactic reconstruction. It treats a range of topics which are representative of current debates in historical syntax. The novelty and merit of the present book is, the editors believe, that, in contrast to most previous work on diachronic syntax, it combines the perspectives of the traditional philological research on syntactic reconstruction with the insights of modern syntactic theory, as it is emphasised in the Foreword by Giuseppe Longobardi. The volume includes articles by well-recognized researchers in historical linguistics with a focus on syntactic change. In the present volume syntactic reconstruction is discussed from a variety of angles, including historical linguistics, phenomena of language contact, generative approaches as well as typological and variationist research. In the articles, languages from a diverse range of families are discussed, including Indo-European, North and South Caucasian, Sino-Tibetan, and Turkic.
Language Arts & Disciplines

Handbook of Comparative and Historical Indo-European Linguistics

Author: Jared Klein

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 1025

View: 386

This book presents the most comprehensive coverage of the field of Indo-European Linguistics in a century, focusing on the entire Indo-European family and treating each major branch and most minor languages. The collaborative work of 120 scholars from 22 countries, Handbook of Comparative and Historical Indo-European Linguistics combines the exhaustive coverage of an encyclopedia with the in-depth treatment of individual monographic studies.
Language Arts & Disciplines

Syntax over Time

Author: Theresa Biberauer

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 432

View: 836

This book provides a critical investigation of syntactic change and the factors that influence it. Converging empirical and theoretical considerations have suggested that apparent instances of syntactic change may be attributable to factors outside syntax proper, such as morphology or information structure. Some even go so far as to propose that there is no such thing as syntactic change, and that all such change in fact takes place in the lexicon or in the phonological component. In this volume, international scholars examine these proposals, drawing on detailed case studies from Germanic, Romance, Chinese, Egyptian, Finnic, Hungarian, and Sámi. They aim to answer such questions as: Can syntactic change arise without an external impetus? How can we tell whether a given change is caused by information-structural or morphological factors? What can 'microsyntactic' investigations of changes in individual lexical items tell us about the bigger picture? How universal are the clausal and nominal templates ('cartography'), and to what extent is syntactic structure more generally subject to universal constraints? The book will be of interest to all linguists working on syntactic variation and change, and especially those who believe that historical linguistics and linguistic theory can, and should, inform one another.