Philosophy

Reconsidering the Life of Power

Author: James Garrison

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 236

View: 411

Offers a compelling intercultural perspective on body, art, self, and society. Reconsidering the Life of Power examines Chinese perspectives on bodily self-cultivation and explores how these can be resources for working past the ritual scripts of everyday life. In recent decades, European and American thinkers like Michel Foucault and Judith Butler have called attention to the way that people live out ritual scripts in order to be recognized by other people such that they might survive. Philosophers in China, however, have a long history of considering ritual not just in terms of confining power structures but also in terms of empowering artistic self-cultivation. Out of this convergence, a response to Butler’s The Psychic Life of Power becomes possible, along with fascinating implications for improving real-world experience. James Garrison looks at art and aesthetics as a way of responding positively to the vicissitudes of everyday life. This means reframing ritual practice in domains like meditation, yoga, tai chi chuan, dance, calisthenics, fashion, and beyond as a kind of work that delves into and unearths society’s long-accruing unconscious habits in a way that makes conscious one’s everyday speech, comportment, countenance, and presence. The everyday body thus becomes an artwork, speaking in novel ways to the everyday self by revealing an alternative to the programmed ritual scripts through which most of us tend to survive. Reconsidering the Life of Power offers a compelling contemporary intercultural perspective on body, art, self, and society that bridges theory and practice by providing an actionable yet deeply philosophical approach to enhancing life. James Garrison is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Baldwin Wallace University.
History

Reconsidering Roman power

Author: Katell Berthelot

Publisher: Publications de l’École française de Rome

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 514

Among the imperial states of the ancient world, the Roman empire stands out for its geographical extent, its longevity and its might. This collective volume investigates how the many peoples inhabiting Rome’s vast empire perceived, experienced, and reacted to both the concrete and the ideological aspects of Roman power. More precisely, it explores how they dealt with Roman might through their religious and political rituals; what they regarded as the empire’s distinctive features, as well as its particular limitations and weaknesses; what forms of criticism they developed towards the way Romans exercised power; and what kind of impact the encounter with Roman power had upon the ways they defined themselves and reflected about power in general. This volume is unusual in bringing Jewish, and especially rabbinic, sources and perspectives together with Roman, Greek or Christian ones. This is the result of its being part of the research program “Judaism and Rome” (ERC Grant Agreement no. 614 424), dedicated to the study of the impact of the Roman empire upon ancient Judaism.
Religion

Reconsidering Creation Ex Nihilo in Genesis 1

Author: Nathan J. Chambers

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 290

View: 758

There is a broad consensus among biblical scholars that creation ex nihilo (from nothing) is a late Hellenistic concept with little inherent connection to Genesis 1 and other biblical creation texts. In this book, Nathan J. Chambers forces us to reconsider the question, arguing in favor of reading this chapter of the Bible in terms of ex nihilo creation and demonstrating that there is a sound basis for the early Christian development of the doctrine. Drawing on the theology of Augustine of Hippo and Thomas Aquinas, Chambers considers what the ex nihilo doctrine means and does in classical Christian dogma. He examines ancient Near Eastern cosmological texts that provide a potential context for reading Genesis 1. Recognizing the distance between the possible historical and theological frameworks for interpreting the text, he illuminates how this doctrine developed within early Christian thought as a consequence of the church’s commitment to reading Genesis 1 as part of Christian Scripture. Through original close readings of the chapter that engage critically with the work of Jon Levenson, Hermann Gunkel, and Brevard Childs, Chambers demonstrates that, far from precluding interpretive possibilities, reading Genesis 1 in terms of creation from nothing opens up a variety of interpretive avenues that have largely been overlooked in contemporary biblical scholarship. Timely and innovative, this book makes the case for a new (or recovered) framework for reading Genesis 1 that will appeal to biblical studies scholars and seminarians.
Religion

Reconsidering Intellectual Disability

Author: Jason Reimer Greig

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 304

View: 927

Drawing on the controversial case of “Ashley X,” a girl with severe developmental disabilities who received interventionist medical treatment to limit her growth and keep her body forever small—a procedure now known as the “Ashley Treatment”—Reconsidering Intellectual Disability explores important questions at the intersection of disability theory, Christian moral theology, and bioethics. What are the biomedical boundaries of acceptable treatment for those not able to give informed consent? Who gets to decide when a patient cannot communicate their desires and needs? Should we accept the dominance of a form of medicine that identifies those with intellectual impairments as pathological objects in need of the normalizing bodily manipulations of technological medicine? In a critical exploration of contemporary disability theory, Jason Reimer Greig contends that L'Arche, a federation of faith communities made up of people with and without intellectual disabilities, provides an alternative response to the predominant bioethical worldview that sees disability as a problem to be solved. Reconsidering Intellectual Disability shows how a focus on Christian theological tradition’s moral thinking and practice of friendship with God offers a way to free not only people with intellectual disabilities but all people from the objectifying gaze of modern medicine. L'Arche draws inspiration from Jesus's solidarity with the "least of these" and a commitment to Christian friendship that sees people with profound cognitive disabilities not as anomalous objects of pity but as fellow friends of God. This vital act of social recognition opens the way to understanding the disabled not as objects to be fixed but as teachers whose lives can transform others and open a new way of being human.
Social Science

Reconsidering Olmec Visual Culture

Author: Carolyn E. Tate

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 359

View: 513

Recently, scholars of Olmec visual culture have identified symbols for umbilical cords, bundles, and cave-wombs, as well as a significant number of women portrayed on monuments and as figurines. In this groundbreaking study, Carolyn Tate demonstrates that these subjects were part of a major emphasis on gestational imagery in Formative Period Mesoamerica. In Reconsidering Olmec Visual Culture, she identifies the presence of women, human embryos, and fetuses in monuments and portable objects dating from 1400 to 400 BC and originating throughout much of Mesoamerica. This highly original study sheds new light on the prominent roles that women and gestational beings played in Early Formative societies, revealing female shamanic practices, the generative concepts that motivated caching and bundling, and the expression of feminine knowledge in the 260-day cycle and related divinatory and ritual activities. Reconsidering Olmec Visual Culture is the first study that situates the unique hollow babies of Formative Mesoamerica within the context of prominent females and the prevalent imagery of gestation and birth. It is also the first major art historical study of La Venta and the first to identify Mesoamerica's earliest creation narrative. It provides a more nuanced understanding of how later societies, including Teotihuacan and West Mexico, as well as the Maya, either rejected certain Formative Period visual forms, rituals, social roles, and concepts or adopted and transformed them into the enduring themes of Mesoamerican symbol systems.
Political Science

Persecution, Privilege & Power

Author: Mark Green

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 431

View: 660

"PERSECUTION, PRIVILEGE & POWER" is a controversial but compelling collection of articles that critically explores the impact and influence of organized Zionism on American life and global politics. In one volume, thirty contributing editors weigh in on the hottest and most taboo subject in the Western world; namely, the overpowering reach and influence of organized Jewish groups towards directing policies in Washington that are favorable to the State of Israel or the perceived well-being of Jews world-wide. The taboo against critically exploring the downside of these tribal machinations is cast aside in this searing and informative anthology.Among the distinguished commentators found in "PERSECUTION, PRIVILEGE & POWER" are: James Petras, Charlie Reese, Alison Weir, Ray McGovern, Kevin MacDonald, Stephen Lendman, John V. Whitbeck, Israel Shamir, Mark Weber, Richard Curtiss, Gilad Atzmon, Joseph Sobran and others. Throughout this volume, Israel's dubious role as an American 'asset' goes under the microscope, as does that nation's favored status with whatever Party rules Washington. The writing is direct and penetrating and the conclusions are often explosive. Domestic politics--even world history--will never quite be the same after reading this incisive compellation of web-based analysis. "PERSECUTION, PRIVILEGE & POWER" is a fast read that also makes a provocative and memorable gift.
Business & Economics

Stop Playing Safe

Author: Margie Warrell

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 272

View: 823

Tap the power of courage and achieve greater clarity, confidence, and satisfaction in your work and life Considering the current state of the global economy, it's easy to see why so many people and companies have become shy about sticking their necks out.
Philosophy

The Political Ontology of Giorgio Agamben

Author: German Eduardo Primera

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 208

View: 830

With the publication of The Use of Bodies (2016), Agamben's multi-volume Homo Sacer project has come to an end, or to paraphrase Agamben, has been abandoned. We now have a new vantage point from which to reread Agamben's corpus; not only his method but his political and philosophical thought can been seen in a clearer light. This timely book both assesses and contributes to the debates on the Homo Sacer project in its entirety. Rethinking the notions of life and power – two of the central themes in Agamben's work – through a reconstruction of his philosophical method and an examination of his critique of Western metaphysics, this book argues that Agamben's thought cannot be fully grasped if we do not account for the intertwining of politics and ontology. This book argues that it is only by revisiting Agamben's critique of signification and metaphysics and examining his reconstruction of the archaeological method that we can understand his notions of life and power. By bringing together the two parts of the Homo Sacer project – the archaeology of the signature of Sovereignty and the archaeology of governmentality – this book provides an analysis of the production of Agambenian 'bare life'. In this sense this project re-articulates Agamben's works on signification, language and ontology with his archaeology of power. Offering an original examination of Agamben's notion of resistance, this is essential reading for any thoughtful consideration of his philosophical legacy.
Philosophy

The Power of Life

Author: David Kishik

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 144

View: 996

Giorgio Agamben's work develops a new philosophy of life. On its horizon lies the conviction that our form of life can become the guiding and unifying power of the politics to come. Informed by this promise, The Power of Life weaves decisive moments and neglected aspects of Agamben's writings over the past four decades together with the thought of those who influenced him most (including Kafka, Heidegger, Benjamin, Arendt, Deleuze, and Foucault). In addition, the book positions his work in relation to key figures from the history of philosophy (such as Plato, Spinoza, Vico, Nietzsche, Wittgenstein, and Derrida). This approach enables Kishik to offer a vision that ventures beyond Agamben's warning against the power over (bare) life in order to articulate the power of (our form of) life and thus to rethink the biopolitical situation. Following Agamben's prediction that the concept of life will stand at the center of the coming philosophy, Kishik points to some of the most promising directions that this philosophy can take.
Business & Economics

Think Again

Author: Adam Grant

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 320

View: 279

#1 New York Times Bestseller “THIS. This is the right book for right now. Yes, learning requires focus. But, unlearning and relearning requires much more—it requires choosing courage over comfort. In Think Again, Adam Grant weaves together research and storytelling to help us build the intellectual and emotional muscle we need to stay curious enough about the world to actually change it. I’ve never felt so hopeful about what I don’t know.” —Brené Brown, Ph.D., #1 New York Times bestselling author of Dare to Lead The bestselling author of Give and Take and Originals examines the critical art of rethinking: learning to question your opinions and open other people's minds, which can position you for excellence at work and wisdom in life Intelligence is usually seen as the ability to think and learn, but in a rapidly changing world, there's another set of cognitive skills that might matter more: the ability to rethink and unlearn. In our daily lives, too many of us favor the comfort of conviction over the discomfort of doubt. We listen to opinions that make us feel good, instead of ideas that make us think hard. We see disagreement as a threat to our egos, rather than an opportunity to learn. We surround ourselves with people who agree with our conclusions, when we should be gravitating toward those who challenge our thought process. The result is that our beliefs get brittle long before our bones. We think too much like preachers defending our sacred beliefs, prosecutors proving the other side wrong, and politicians campaigning for approval--and too little like scientists searching for truth. Intelligence is no cure, and it can even be a curse: being good at thinking can make us worse at rethinking. The brighter we are, the blinder to our own limitations we can become. Organizational psychologist Adam Grant is an expert on opening other people's minds--and our own. As Wharton's top-rated professor and the bestselling author of Originals and Give and Take, he makes it one of his guiding principles to argue like he's right but listen like he's wrong. With bold ideas and rigorous evidence, he investigates how we can embrace the joy of being wrong, bring nuance to charged conversations, and build schools, workplaces, and communities of lifelong learners. You'll learn how an international debate champion wins arguments, a Black musician persuades white supremacists to abandon hate, a vaccine whisperer convinces concerned parents to immunize their children, and Adam has coaxed Yankees fans to root for the Red Sox. Think Again reveals that we don't have to believe everything we think or internalize everything we feel. It's an invitation to let go of views that are no longer serving us well and prize mental flexibility over foolish consistency. If knowledge is power, knowing what we don't know is wisdom.
Performing Arts

Reconsidering Roots

Author: Erica Ball

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 234

View: 382

These essays--from scholars in history, sociology, film, and media studies--interrogate Roots, assessing the ways that the book and its dramatization recast representations of slavery, labor, and the black family; reflected on the promise of freedom and civil rights; and engaged discourses of race, gender, violence, and power.
Philosophy

Rethink

Author: Amol Rajan

Publisher: Random House

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 352

View: 625

After darkness, there is always light In a time of increasing uncertainty, Rethink offers a guide to a much-needed global 'reset moment', with leading international figures giving us glimpses of a better future after the pandemic. Each contribution explores a different aspect of public and private life that can be re-examined - from Pope Francis on poverty and the Dalai Lama on the role of ancient wisdom to Brenda Hale on the courts and Tara Westover on the education divide; from Elif Shafak on uncertainty and Steven Pinker on Human Nature to Xine Yao on masks and Jarvis Cocker on environmental revolution. Collectively, they offer a roadmap for positive change after a year of unprecedented hardship. Based on the hit BBC podcast, and with introductions by presenter and journalist Amol Rajan, Rethink gives us the opportunity to consider what a better world might look like and reaffirms that after darkness there is always light. RETHINK List of contributors WHO WE ARE Carlo Rovelli - Rethinking Humanity Pope Francis - Rethinking Poverty Peter Hennessy - Rethinking Democracy Anand Giridharadas - Rethinking Capitalism Jared Diamond - Rethinking a Global Response Ziauddin Sardar - Rethinking Normality The Dalai Lama - Rethinking Ancient Wisdom C.K. Lal - Rethinking Institutions Jarvis Cocker - Rethinking an Environmental Revolution Clare Chambers - Rethinking the Body Steven Pinker - Rethinking Human Nature Tom Rivett-Carnac - Rethinking History Jonathan Sumption - Rethinking the State WHAT WE DO David Skelton - Rethinking Industry Emma Griffin - Rethinking Work Caleb Femi - Rethinking Education Gina McCarthy - Rethinking Activism Tara Westover - Rethinking the Education Divide Kwame Anthony Appiah - Rethinking the Power of Small Actions Charlotte Lydia Riley - Rethinking Universities K.K. Shailaja - Rethinking Development Samantha Power - Rethinking Global Governance KT Tunstall - Rethinking the Music Industry Rebecca Adlington - Rethinking the Athlete's Life Brenda Hale - Rethinking the Courts Nisha Katona - Rethinking Hospitality Katherine Granger - Rethinking the Olympics David Graeber - Rethinking Jobs James Harding - Rethinking News Carolyn McCall Rethinking Television HOW WE FEEL Mohammad Hanif - Rethinking Intimacy H.R. McMaster - Rethinking Empathy Carol Cooper - Rethinking Racial Equality Paul Krugman - Rethinking Solidarity Amonge Sinxoto - Rethinking Safety Reed Hastings - Rethinking Togetherness Kang Kyung-wha - Rethinking Accountability Lucy Jones - Rethinking Biophilia Colin Jackson - Rethinking Our Responsibility for Our Health Mirabelle Morah - Rethinking Ourselves Nicci Gerrard - Rethinking Old Age Brian Eno - Rethinking the Winners Jude Browne - Rethinking Responsibility Elif Shafak Rethinking Uncertainty HOW WE LIVE Amanda Levete - Rethinking How We Live Niall Ferguson - Rethinking Progress David Wallace-Wells - Rethinking Consensus Margaret MacMillan - Rethinking International Cooperation HRH The Prince of Wales - Rethinking Nature Onora O'Neill - Rethinking Digital Power Matthew Walker - Rethinking Sleep Henry Dimbleby - Rethinking How We Eat Eliza Manningham-Buller - Rethinking Health Inequality Pascal Soriot - Rethinking Medical Co-operation Xine Yao - Rethinking Masks George Soros - Rethinking Debt Mariana Mazzucato - Rethinking Value Douglas Alexander - Rethinking Economic Dignity WHERE WE GO Peter Frankopan - Rethinking Asia Stuart Russell - Rethinking AI DeRay McKesson - Rethinking the Impossible V.S. Ramachandran - Rethinking Brains Seb Emina - Rethinking Travel Aaron Bastani - Rethinking an Aging Population Rana Foroohar - Rethinking Data Anthony Townsend - Rethinking Robots
Law

Reconsidering Constitutional Formation II Decisive Constitutional Normativity

Author: Ulrike Müßig

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 419

View: 169

This second volume of ReConFort, published open access, addresses the decisive role of constitutional normativity, and focuses on discourses concerning the legal role of constitutional norms. Taken together with ReConFort I (National Sovereignty), it calls for an innovative reassessment of constitutional history drawing on key categories to convey the legal nature of the constitution itself (national sovereignty, precedence, justiciability of power, judiciary as constituted power). In the late 18th and early 19th centuries, constitutional normativity began to complete the legal fixation of the entire political order. This juridification in one constitutional text resulted in a conceptual differentiation from ordinary law, which extends to alterability and justiciability. The early expressions of this ‘new order of the ages’ suggest an unprecedented and irremediable break with European legal tradition, be it with British colonial governance or the French ancien régime. In fact, while the shift to constitutions as a hierarchically ‘higher’ form of positive law was a revolutionary change, it also drew upon old liberties. The American constitutional discourse, which was itself heavily influenced by British common law, in turn served as an inspiration for a variety of constitutional experiments – from the French Revolution to Napoleon’s downfall, in the halls of the Frankfurt Assembly, on the road to a unified Italy, and in the later theoretical discourse of twentieth-century Austria. If the constitution states the legal rules for the law-making process, then its Kelsian primacy is mandatory. Also included in this volume are the French originals and English translations of two vital documents. The first – Emmanuel Joseph Sieyès’ Du Jury Constitutionnaire (1795) – highlights an early attempt to reconcile the democratic values of the French Revolution with the pragmatic need to legally protect the Revolution. The second – the 1812 draft of the Constitution of the Kingdom of Poland – presents the ‘constitutional propaganda’ of the Russian Tsar Alexander I to bargain for the support of the Lithuanian and Polish nobility. These documents open new avenues of research into Europe’s constitutional history: one replete with diverse contexts and national experiences, but above all an overarching motif of constitutional decisiveness that served to complete the juridification of sovereignty. (www.reconfort.eu)
History

The Founding Fathers Reconsidered

Author: R. B. Bernstein

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 238

View: 219

Here is a vividly written and compact overview of the brilliant, flawed, and quarrelsome group of lawyers, politicians, merchants, military men, and clergy known as the "Founding Fathers"--who got as close to the ideal of the Platonic "philosopher-kings" as American or world history has ever seen. In The Founding Fathers Reconsidered, R. B. Bernstein reveals Washington, Franklin, Jefferson, Adams, Hamilton, and the other founders not as shining demigods but as imperfect human beings--people much like us--who nevertheless achieved political greatness. They emerge here as men who sought to transcend their intellectual world even as they were bound by its limits, men who strove to lead the new nation even as they had to defer to the great body of the people and learn with them the possibilities and limitations of politics. Bernstein deftly traces the dynamic forces that molded these men and their contemporaries as British colonists in North America and as intellectual citizens of the Atlantic civilization's Age of Enlightenment. He analyzes the American Revolution, the framing and adoption of state and federal constitutions, and the key concepts and problems--among them independence, federalism, equality, slavery, and the separation of church and state--that both shaped and circumscribed the founders' achievements as the United States sought its place in the world.
Literary Criticism

Rethinking the Monstrous

Author: Jim Byatt

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 198

View: 825

Rethinking the Monstrous considers the remaindered other in contemporary British society and the representation of that other in British fiction since 1967. By examining a diverse range of texts that address an equally diverse range of identities, this book addresses the questions of what otherness means in contemporary society, how it manifests and manages itself, and how the fiction of the period addresses the social anomaly. This book's focus lies with novels that engage with those figures who have remained socially excluded, including the criminally transgressive and the culturally stigmatized, in an attempt to demonstrate a continuity of resistance to a diverse range of tabooed and monstrous identities.
Social Science

Deconstructing the Stereotype: Reconsidering Indian Culture, Literature and Cinema

Author: Kaustav Chakraborty

Publisher: diplom.de

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 169

View: 377

Stereotypes are mere 'pictures in our heads'. Prejudice and suspicion against all that is perceived of as ‘different’ give rise to cultural stereotypes. Creating stereotypes also involves connecting the created categories with values, equipping the categories with an ideational label. Thus, stereotypes often contain the presupposition that one’s own group represents the normal, or even universal and that one’s own culture and ist socially construed concepts of reality is superior and normative in relation to other cultures and world-views. The stereotypes are not just one person’s private attitude but are always shared with a larger socio-cultural group. Stereotypes result in simplifications that prevent people from seeing the ‘otherized’ individuals as they truly are. This book, aims at transgressing the boundaries of the strategically generated stereotyped image of a homogenous Indian culture. Rather, by highlighting the marginalised issues related to class, caste and gender, this book, by citing examples of select Indian literary and cinematic representations, argues that the stigma related to the non-conformist /alternative/minority identities, is baseless and fraudulent.
Literary Criticism

Ecology Without Nature

Author: Rita Shea Guffey Chair of English Timothy Morton

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 249

View: 882

In Ecology without Nature, Timothy Morton argues that the chief stumbling block to environmental thinking is the image of nature itself. Ecological writers propose a new worldview, but their very zeal to preserve the natural world leads them away from the "nature" they revere. The problem is a symptom of the ecological catastrophe in which we are living. Morton sets out a seeming paradox: to have a properly ecological view, we must relinquish the idea of nature once and for all. Ecology without Nature investigates our ecological assumptions in a way that is provocative and deeply engaging. Ranging widely in eighteenth-century through contemporary philosophy, culture, and history, he explores the value of art in imagining environmental projects for the future. Morton develops a fresh vocabulary for reading "environmentality" in artistic form as well as content, and traces the contexts of ecological constructs through the history of capitalism. From John Clare to John Cage, from Kierkegaard to Kristeva, from The Lord of the Rings to electronic life forms, Ecology without Nature widens our view of ecological criticism, and deepens our understanding of ecology itself. Instead of trying to use an idea of nature to heal what society has damaged, Morton sets out a radical new form of ecological criticism: "dark ecology."