Business & Economics

Remaking the Economic Institutions of Socialism

Author: Victor Nee

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 436

View: 369

To what extent can contemporary socialist economies be reformed by the introduction of markets? The question is usually debated in either a Chinese or an East European context; this collection of eleven essays is unique in taking the first steps toward a comparative analysis. Twenty years of experience with reforms in Hungary and a decade of experimentation with reforms in China proivde a critical mass of evidence for analyzing the problems endemic to cnetrally planned economies and the dilemmas faced in efforts to reform them. In reflecting on the Chinese and East European experiences, these essays trace the shift from a conception of reform as a mix of planning and makrets within the state sector to a socialist mixed economy with implications for the emergence of new social groups and autonomous social organizations. The essays exemplify a new perspective in the study of state socialism that changes the focus from ideologies to economic institutions, examining how the activities of subordinate groups place limits on the power of state elites. The authors include scholars who have shaped debates in Eastern Europe and whose work is now stimulating much discussion in China, as well as representatives of a younger generation of economists, sociologists, and political scientists writing on the basis of field research recently conducted in factories, cities, and villages in China and Eastern Europe. The contributors are: Wlodzimierz Brus, Walter D. Connor, Zhiren Lin, Victor Nee, Susan Shirk, David Stark, Ivan Szelenyi, and Martin King Whyte. An introductory essays surveys recent theories and research on state socialism and outlines a new institutional perspective for understanding the dilemmas of partial reforms, the political cycles of reform and retrenchment, and the role of subordinate groups in stimulating changes outside the state sector.
Social Science

The Capitalist Transformation of State Socialism

Author: David Lane

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 380

View: 538

David Lane outlines succinctly yet comprehensively the development and transformation of state socialism. While focussing on Russia and the countries of Eastern Europe, he also engages in a discussion of the Chinese path. In response to the changing social structure and external demands, he outlines different scenarios of reform. He contends that European state socialism did not collapse but was consciously dismantled. He brings out the West’s decisive support of the reform process and Gorbachev’s significant role in tipping the balance of political forces in favour of an emergent ascendant class. In the post-socialist period, he details developments in the economy and politics. He distinguishes different political and economic trajectories of countries of the former USSR, the New Member States of the European Union, and China; and he notes the attempts to promote further change through ‘coloured’ revolutions. The book provides a detailed account not only of the unequal impact of transformation on social inequality which has given rise to a privileged business and political class, but also how far the changes have fulfilled the promise of democracy promotion, wealth creation and human development. Finally, in the context of globalisation, the author considers possible future political and economic developments for Russia and China. Throughout the author, a leading expert in the field, brings to bear his deep knowledge of socialist countries, draws on his research on the former Soviet Union, and visits to nearly all the former state socialist countries, including China.
Business & Economics

The Institutional Approach to Labour and Development

Author: Klárá Fóti

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 247

View: 795

Bringing together the work of economists and sociologists in research programmes in a number of European institutions concerned with development, this collection analyses how social institutions contribute to an understanding of development. It shows how labour markets, labour relations and employment patterns respond to institutional forces, and thereby shape development paths and determine how different groups benefit from economic growth.
Business & Economics

The Life and Times of Soviet Socialism

Author: Alex F. Dowlah

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 300

View: 894

Real-world models and interpretive perspectives on Soviet economic and political theory and practice from 1917 through 1991.
Business & Economics

Markets in the Name of Socialism

Author: Johanna Bockman

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 354

View: 515

Challenging conventional accounts, Markets in the Name of Socialism chronicles a transnational dialogue among economists on both sides of the Iron Curtain about democracy, socialism, and markets. These exchanges led to the transformations of 1989 and, unintentionally, the rise of neoliberalism.
Business & Economics

Restructuring Networks in Post-socialism

Author: Lecturer in Economic Geography Gernot Grabher

Publisher: Clarendon Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 368

View: 917

This book is about change in Central and Eastern Europe, and about how we think about social and economic change more generally. In contrast to the dominant 'transition framework' that examines organizational forms in Eastern Europe according to the degree to which they conform to, or depart from, the blueprints of already existing capitalist systems, this book examines the innovative character, born of necessity, in which actors in the post-socialist setting are restructuring organizations and institutions by redefining and recombining resources. Instead of thinking of these recombinations as accidental aberrations, the book explores their evolutionary potentials. The starting premise of Restructuring Networks in Post-Socialist Societies is that the actual unit of entrepreneurship is not the isolated individual personality but the social network that links firms and the actors within them. Drawing insight from evolutionary economics and from the new methods of network analysis, leading sociologists, economists, and political scientists report on changes in organizational forms in Hungary, Poland, Eastern Germany, Russia, and the Czech Republic.
Business & Economics

Economic Institutions and Democratic Reform

Author: Ole Nørgaard

Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 280

View: 400

"This book will be essential and challenging reading for political scientists and economists as well as policymakers in NGOs. such as aid agencies and the institutions of the EU."--BOOK JACKET.
History

Transition to Capitalism?

Author: János Mátyás Kovács

Publisher: Transaction Publishers

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 323

View: 216

This work observes how the political ideologies, social values, and theoretical paradigms of Eastern European scholars and politicians changed throughout the period of transformation following the 1989 political revolutions in Eastern Europe. The authors try to reinterpret the institutions, movements, and ideologies that allegedly contributed to the erosion of the old regimes in Eastern Europe, asking whether these--alternative--legacies of communism support the transition to capitalism.
History

Rethinking the Cold War

Author: Allen Hunter

Publisher: Temple University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 254

Collects essays that reassess the Cold War offering a more complex analysis of its history and legacy.
Business & Economics

Institutional Change: Theory and Empirical Findings

Author: Sven-Erik Sjostrand

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 256

View: 812

This book brings together some 15 papers drawn from the 330 papers presented at the Third Annual Conference of the Society for the Advancement of Socio-Economics in Stockholm, Sweden in June 1991. Part 1 outlines a basic theory of institutional change; Parts 2 and 3 examine case studies in international experience with institutional change. The authors of the original papers include Douglas North, Amitai Etzioni, Oliver Williamson, as well as eminent scholars from Eastern and Western Europe, representing views and analyses from ten different countries.