Art

A Corpus of Rembrandt Paintings IV

Author: Ernst van de Wetering

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 690

View: 734

Volume IV of A Corpus of Rembrandt Paintings deals uniquely with the self-portraits of Rembrandt. In a clearly written explanatory style the head of the Rembrandt Research Project and Editor of this Volume, Ernst van de Wetering, discusses the full body of work of paintings and etchings portraying Rembrandt. He sets the different parameters for accepting or rejecting a Rembrandt self-portrait as such, whilst also discussing the exact working environment of Rembrandt and his apprentices. This workshop setting created a surroundings where apprentices could be involved in working on Rembrandt paintings making it more difficult to determine the hand of the master. Van de Wetering, who is one of the Rembrandt experts of our day and age, goes down to great detail to explain how the different self-portraits are made and what techniques Rembrandt uses, also giving an overview of which paintings are to be attributed to the Dutch Master and which not. In the additional catalogue the self-portraits are examined in detail. In clear and accessible explanatory text the different paintings are discussed, larded with immaculate images of each painting. Details are shown where possible, as well as the results of modern day technical imaging like X-radiography. This work of art history and art research should be part of every serious art historical institute, university or museum. Nowhere in the art history have all Rembrandt’s self portraits been discussed in such detailed and comparative manner by an authority such as Ernst van de Wetering. This is a standard work for decades to come.
Painting, Dutch

Rembrandt, Self-portraits

Author: Christopher Wright

Publisher: Penguin Putnam

ISBN:

Category: Painting, Dutch

Page: 133

View: 660

A collection of Rembrandt's self-portraits throughout his life.

Rembrandt by Rembrandt

Author: Pascal Bonafoux

Publisher: Abrams

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 160

View: 513

Rembrandt's revealing self-portraits in an appealing, affordable format Celebrated as the supreme painter of the human condition, Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn (1606-1669) famously turned the intense spotlight of his empathetic vision on himself. In the course of 60 years, he produced more than 50 self-portraits, in mediums ranging from paintings to drawings to engravings. Rembrandt stood at the beginning of a long tradition of self-portraiture--one that has given us both Cindy Sherman in the high arts, and selfies as the primary form of visual self-expression in everyday life--and he explored its potential in a thoroughly modern way. He portrayed the face he turned to the world, from youth to old age: a dandy, a husband, an artist, a solitary genius, among many other characters. He captured inner states that are universal to existence. Rembrandt by Rembrandt reproduces Rembrandt's self-portraits, with commentary about each one, in an appealing portable format that makes a perfect gift for any art lover.
Art

A Corpus of Rembrandt Paintings IV

Author: Ernst van de Wetering

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 690

View: 213

Volume IV of A Corpus of Rembrandt Paintings deals uniquely with the self-portraits of Rembrandt. In a clearly written explanatory style the head of the Rembrandt Research Project and Editor of this Volume, Ernst van de Wetering, discusses the full body of work of paintings and etchings portraying Rembrandt. He sets the different parameters for accepting or rejecting a Rembrandt self-portrait as such, whilst also discussing the exact working environment of Rembrandt and his apprentices. This workshop setting created a surroundings where apprentices could be involved in working on Rembrandt paintings making it more difficult to determine the hand of the master. Van de Wetering, who is one of the Rembrandt experts of our day and age, goes down to great detail to explain how the different self-portraits are made and what techniques Rembrandt uses, also giving an overview of which paintings are to be attributed to the Dutch Master and which not. In the additional catalogue the self-portraits are examined in detail. In clear and accessible explanatory text the different paintings are discussed, larded with immaculate images of each painting. Details are shown where possible, as well as the results of modern day technical imaging like X-radiography. This work of art history and art research should be part of every serious art historical institute, university or museum. Nowhere in the art history have all Rembrandt’s self portraits been discussed in such detailed and comparative manner by an authority such as Ernst van de Wetering. This is a standard work for decades to come.
Art

Rembrandt's Self-portraits

Author: H. Perry Chapman

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 189

View: 894

Examines all seventy-five self-portraits in their cultural and historical setting, and looks at what they reveal about the artist
Painters

Rembrandt

Author: Robert Genaille

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Painters

Page: 16

View: 540

Art

A Corpus of Rembrandt Paintings

Author: J. Bruyn

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 4800

View: 997

This collection is dedicated to the painted works of Rembrandt. It presents a vast amount of meticulous research on Rembrandt’s paintings covering the early years until his later years, and with a special focus on his self-portraits and small-scale history paintings. The main aim of this project was to isolate Rembrandt’s own works from the great volume of Rembrandt-like paintings, produced by his many pupils and followers, sometimes with the involvement of the master himself. As a result, the CORPUS contains examinations of the originals of all works attributed to Rembrandt; with these examinations having taken full advantage of today’s sophisticated techniques including radiography, neutron activation autoradiography, dendrochronology and paint sample analysis. Since the second half of the last century, art historians, realizing that the image of Rembrandt’s work had become blurred with time, have attempted to redefine the artist’s significance both as a source of inspiration to other artists and as a great artist in his own right. Carrying on the work started by previous generations, a group of leading Dutch art historians from the university and museum world joined forces in the late 1960s in order to study afresh the paintings usually ascribed to Rembrandt. The researchers came together in the Rembrandt Research Project (RRP). In the course of the completion of this project and the publication of the six volumes, the composition of the group of researchers changed, and at the same time, the group’s approach changed as a result of art-historical and methodological developments. The changes and developments are reflected in the break in style between volumes III and IV. The first three volumes take a historical and chronological approach. They cover Rembrandt’s early years in Leiden (1629-1631), his first years in Amsterdam (1631-1634), and finally his later years of reputation (1635-1642). The fourth and fifth volume take a thematic approach. Dedicated to Rembrandt’s self-portraits, volume IV looks at the valuation of autograph paintings, at dress and meaning in his self-portraits, and at authenticity and function. Volume V is about the small-scale history and genre paintings, an area considered to be the most challenging assignments for an artist. The volume presents the systematic research into this hitherto little known area, revealing a rich, and often fresh understanding of Rembrandt’s own way of thinking about these basic aspects. Volume VI, the set’s last volume, revisits Rembrandt’s paintings and is both a revisionary critique of the first three volumes and an independent overview. Each volume combines a number of introductory chapters with a full catalogue of all paintings for the given period or theme. In the catalogues, each painting is discussed and examined in a detailed way, comprising a descriptive, an interpretative and a documentary section.

Rembrandt

Author: Christopher Wright

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 133

View: 376

Second Sight

Author: National Gallery (Great Britain)

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 24

View: 460

Art

Essays in Self-portraiture

Author: Andrew Small

Publisher: Peter Lang Pub Incorporated

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 146

View: 785

Essays in Self-Portraiture is the first book-length study devoted entirely to comparing the written self-portrait of Montaigne with the painted self-portraits of another artist, Rembrandt. The author begins by examining the nature of self-portraiture, which he defines in relationship to biography, autobiography and portraiture. Thereafter he examines the origin and nature of self-portraiture as a toponymical phenomenon. By pairing specific self-portraits, the author compares Rembrandt and Montaigne in terms of courtiership and in terms of religious wisdom and ignorance. The book closes by showing how both artists used dissimilarity in their self-portraits. By selectively embracing and rejecting certain exemplars, Montaigne and Rembrandt constructed two of our most complete examples of the early modern self.
Portrait painting

Rembrandt

Author: Pascal Bonafoux

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Portrait painting

Page: 159

View: 871

Poetry

If Not for These Wrinkles of Darkness

Author: Stephen Frech

Publisher: White Pine Press

ISBN:

Category: Poetry

Page: 71

View: 540

Winner of the Sixth Annual White Pine Press Poetry Prize, selected by Pattiann Rogers. Seventeenth century Dutch painter Rembrandt van Rijn's life, known to us almost exclusively through his paintings and thin written documentation, is the stuff of real drama: he survived several plagues, two wives, and four children. Selected by Pattiann Rogers as the winner of the Sixth Annual White Pine Press Poetry Prize, these lyric poems convey the emotional life of the artist and show him as deeply human: flawed, burdened, sympathetic, and desperately honest about himself and others. Stephen Frech has published widely in magazines and journals. He lives in Chicago.

Rembrandt Van Rijn - Self-Portrait 1659

Author: Imagepixel Imagepixel

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 122

View: 784

Rembrandt van Rijn - 1659 Self-Portrait. 6" x 9" notebook journal with 120 blank lined pages. Great for work or school, note taking, journaling, writing to do list, or just for doodling drawings. This daily journal is a creative gift idea for family or friends during birthdays or the holidays, or during back to school.
Art

Rembrandt's Nose

Author: Michael Taylor

Publisher: Distributed Art Pub Incorporated

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 167

View: 459

Rembrandt's Nose ISBN 1-933045-44-2 / 978-1-933045-44-3 Hardcover, / pgs / / U.S. CDN To be set / Nonfiction and Criticism If the sitter is the lead actor of a performance, for in essence that is what a portrait is, then the nose is his understudy on the stage of the face. The nose stands in the center, the focal point of our gaze if not the exact center, and demands that we notice it. It's a peacockish actor: too obvious, too egotistical, too histrionic. It upstages the rest of the face and would make us forget that its posturing is mere vanity and vacuity compared to the eloquence of the eyes and lips.

Rembrandt Planner #4

Author: Twisted City Rembrandt Gifts

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 124

View: 596

2020 Planner Self-portrait - by Rembrandt Van Rijn, 1606 - 1669 6x9" - 15.24x22.86cm Weekly and Monthly Planner Calendar Views Dot Grid pages for notes and doodles Rembrandt was a Dutch draughtsman, painter, and printmaker. An innovative and prolific master in three media, he is generally considered one of the greatest visual artists in the history of art and the most important in Dutch art history. This is the perfect Rembrandt gift for artists, designers, illustrators, art teachers and students.
Art

Harmensz van Rijn Rembrandt

Author: Emile Michel

Publisher: Parkstone International

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 160

View: 213

Rembrandt is completely mysterious in his spirit, his character, his life, his work and his method of painting. What we can divine of his essential nature comes through his painting and the trivial or tragic incidents of his unfortunate life; his penchant for ostentatious living forced him to declare bankruptcy. His misfortunes are not entirely explicable, and his oeuvre reflects disturbing notions and contradictory impulses emerging from the depths of his being, like the light and shade of his pictures. In spite of this, nothing perhaps in the history of art gives a more profound impression of unity than his paintings, composed though they are of such different elements, full of complex significations. One feels as if his intellect, that genial, great, free mind, bold and ignorant of all servitude and which led him to the loftiest meditations and the most sublime reveries, derived from the same source as his emotions. From this comes the tragic element he imprinted on everything he painted, irrespective of subject; there was inequality in his work as well as the sublime, which may be seen as the inevitable consequence of such a tumultuous existence. It seems as though this singular, strange, attractive and almost enigmatic personality was slow in developing, or at least in attaining its complete expansion. Rembrandt showed talent and an original vision of the world early, as evidenced in his youthful etchings and his first self-portraits of about 1630. In painting, however, he did not immediately find the method he needed to express the still incomprehensible things he had to say, that audacious, broad and personal method which we admire in the masterpieces of his maturity and old age. In spite of its subtlety, it was adjudged brutal in his day and certainly contributed to alienate his public. From the time of his beginnings and of his successes, however, lighting played a major part in his conception of painting and he made it the principal instrument of his investigations into the arcana of interior life. It already revealed to him the poetry of human physiognomy when he painted The Philosopher in Meditation or the Holy Family, so deliciously absorbed in its modest intimacy, or, for example, in The Angel Raphael leaving Tobias. Soon he asked for something more. The Night Watch marks at once the apotheosis of his reputation. He had a universal curiosity and he lived, meditated, dreamed and painted thrown back on himself. He thought of the great Venetians, borrowing their subjects and making of them an art out of the inner life of profound emotion. Mythological and religious subjects were treated as he treated his portraits. For all that he took from reality and even from the works of others, he transmuted it instantly into his own substance.