History

Roman London's Amphitheatre

Author: Nick Bateman

Publisher: Museum of London Archaeology Svc

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 64

View: 324

"First published in November 2000 as Gladiators at the Guildhall"--T.p. verso.
History

London's Roman Amphitheatre

Author: Nick Bateman

Publisher: Museum of London Archaeology Svc

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 241

View: 946

The discovery of one of Roman Londons most significant buildings - its amphitheatre - underneath the medieval Guildhall resulted from major archaeological excavations which took place between 1985 and 1999 as part of the City of London Corporations ambitious programme of redevelopment at the Guildhall. The history of the Guildhall and its precinct from the 12th to the 20th centuries is the subject of a companion volume. This book describes the construction, development and disuse of the amphitheatre, from the 1st to 4th centuries AD. Constructed on relatively low ground in the north-west part of Londinium, the first amphitheatre was built in c AD 74 of timber. Evidence was recovered for the eastern entrance, arena palisade, bank for seating and associated drains. The amphitheatre was rebuilt shortly after AD 120, with masonry foundations and walls, associated with new timber stands. The evidence allows conjectural reconstruction and comparison with other British amphitheatres. Abandoned by the mid 4th century, the amphitheatre was largely demolished and sealed by dark earth. The arena may have survived as an oval depression until the area was reoccupied in the 11th century. Significant finds assemblages include an early 2nd-century dump of glass cullet, lead curses from the arena surface and samian pottery with gladiatorial motifs. The amphitheatres remains are preserved and displayed in the basement of the new Guildhall Art Gallery.
Drama

London Civic Theatre

Author: Anne Lancashire

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 355

View: 824

Publisher Description
True Crime

Bloody London

Author: Declan McHugh

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: True Crime

Page: 176

View: 345

Where did the real Jack the Ripper live? Which pub in London has been used more than any other by serial killers picking up their victims? Where was the capital's Gladiators’ Arena? Where in London did Anders Breivik, the Norwegian mass murderer, live as a child? Jack The Ripper (and 15 other London serial killers!), the Krays, Aleister Crowley, Ruth Ellis, Doctor John Dee, Sach and Walters the baby farmers – all these characters and more are covered in Bloody London, a unique and terrifying walk through the dark, gore-drenched streets of the capital. A must-have for fans of crime, horror, the supernatural and the simply bizarre, Bloody London will also show you: • Sites of executions and unsolved murders • London’s creepiest cemeteries • Where famous horror authors lived and worked • Where the Plague originated • A haunted church and many other locations… London’s dark and shocking secrets are laid bare in this compendium of true stories. We dare you to look inside…
History

Gladiators at the Guildhall

Author: Nick Bateman

Publisher: Museum of London Archaeology Svc

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 92

View: 541

For over a hundred years people had searched for the Roman amphitheatre of London. In 1988, during a dig at the City's medieval Guildhall, the astonishing discovery was made. The curving stone walls of the arena and timber beams for the seating tiers confirmed that the gladiators' place of spectacle - lost for over 1500 years - had finally been found. The amphitheatre lay abandoned for centuries until - when little more than a hollow in the landscape - it became the site of a Viking trading settlement. The dig revealed some of the most complete remains of 11th-century timber houses to be found anywhere in Europe - showing how London thrived under King Cnut and the Danes. These simple buildings gave way to the first Guildhall, which evolved into a complex building at the political and economic heart of the medieval City. Gladiators at the Guildhall tells a tale of archaeological discovery, and of a place that resounds with the clash of Roman gladiators, the clamour of vikings bartering with merchants from Byzantium, and the chanting of medieval priests as Dick Whittington is elected mayor for the third time.
Social Science

The Origin of Roman London

Author: Lacey M. Wallace

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page:

View: 740

In this book Dr Wallace makes a fundamental contribution to the study of urbanism in the Roman provinces. She attempts for the first time to present a detailed archaeological account of the first decade of one of the best-excavated cities in the Roman Empire. Delving into the artefact and structural reports from all excavations of pre-Boudican levels in London, she brings together vast quantities of data which are discussed and illustrated according to a novel methodology that address both the difficulties and complexity of 'grey literature' and urban excavation.
Literary Criticism

A Companion to Sport and Spectacle in Greek and Roman Antiquity

Author: Paul Christesen

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 680

View: 479

A Companion to Sport and Spectacle in Greek and Roman Antiquity presents a series of essays that apply a socio-historical perspective to myriad aspects of ancient sport and spectacle. Covers the Bronze Age to the Byzantine Empire Includes contributions from a range of international scholars with various Classical antiquity specialties Goes beyond the usual concentrations on Olympia and Rome to examine sport in cities and territories throughout the Mediterranean basin Features a variety of illustrations, maps, end-of-chapter references, internal cross-referencing, and a detailed index to increase accessibility and assist researchers
History

Roman London

Author: Dominic Perring

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 150

View: 512

First Published in 2004. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Amphitheaters

The Roman Amphitheatre in Britain

Author: Tony Wilmott

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Amphitheaters

Page: 222

View: 509

This study of all the Roman amphitheatres in Britain draws on the recent excavations at Chester, London and Silchester. Wilmott describes every ampitheatre, amphitheatre-type structure and mixed theatre/amphitheatre structure in Roman Britain.
History

Roman and Medieval Cripplegate, City of London

Author: Elizabeth Howe

Publisher: Museum of London Archaeology Svc

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 144

View: 653

Redevelopment in the 1990s gave archaeologists the opportunity to re-examine an area investigated by Professor W. F. Grimes after the Second World War, when his discovery of the Cripplegate fort revolutionised our understanding of Roman London. Publication of the results of work at five separate developer-funded sites in a single synthetic volume, supplemented by conclusions from a sixth, has been made possible through the collaboration of the developers whose logos are displayed on the front cover, and the support of CgMs archaeological consultancy and the City of London Planning Department. Bronze Age field ditches were sealed by domestic buildings relating to the expansion of early Roman London after A.D. 70, contemporary with the timber amphitheatre located nearby beneath the Guildhall. The masonry fort was built in the early 2nd century AD and there was no evidence of a long-suspected predecessor. New evidence of the number, type and layout of barracks suggests that the fort could accommodate a larger garrison than the governor's bodyguard. The fort's buildings apparently went out of use around the end of the 2nd century AD and its southern defensive ditch was backfilled, although the internal roads continued to be resurfaced for a time. Extensive reoccupation came with the establishment of burgage plots after AD 1050. Twelfth-century development included buildings with cellars, and evidence for bone working and metalworking. Birds of prey and high-equality pottery and glass imply the presence of a high-status person or property in the 13th century, but truncation meant that little survived from the period after 1300.
Social Science

Roman Working Lives and Urban Living

Author: Hillel Schwartz

Publisher: Oxbow Books Limited

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 458

Comes out of a conference on 'Roman Working Lives and Urban Living' held at the University of Durham in 2001. The twelve papers presented in this book have been organized into two categories: Urban living and the settings for working lives, and People atwork: owners, and artisans, crafts and professions.
History

Religion in Medieval London

Author: Bruno Barber

Publisher: Museum of London Archaeology Svc

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 144

View: 813

This fully illustrated book summarises the evidence of belief from archaeological excavations in and around London.
Social Science

Roman London

Author: N. C. W. Bateman

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 112

View: 164

Römerzeit - Wirtschaftsgeschichte - Sakralgebäude.
History

A Guide to the Roman Remains in Britain

Author: Roger John Anthony Wilson

Publisher: Constable & Robinson Limited

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 453

View: 554

This handbook to Britain's Roman heritage is aimed at the non-specialist reader, and provides comprehensive coverage of the visible remains of Roman Britain. Descriptions are accompanied by site plans and access details, ranging from the Roman bridge at Swainshill to the marching camps at Troutbeck in Cumbria.
History

The Silchester Amphitheatre

Author: Michael Fulford

Publisher: Soc for the Promotion of Roman stds

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 197

View: 614

This companion volume to Britannia Monographs Nos. 5 & 15 throws new light on one of the principal monuments of Roman Silchester and examines the functions of urban and military amphitheatres in Britain.