Drama

Rooms in Dramatic Realism

Author: Fred Miller Robinson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 114

View: 221

Dramatic Realism, since its birth in the hectic late years of the nineteenth century, gave theatrical and thematic energy to the interaction between a play’s text and the way that it looked on the stage. Characters began to find themselves in rooms and settings that played an active and changing role in the drama, and their dialogue and reactions evolved in time with these changes. As life itself became more elaborate during the 20th Century, so these rooms were invaded and then defined by the outside world. Fred Miller Robinson’s enjoyable and stimulating essays on this enduring genre tackle the dreams and anxieties of the middles classes of the Industrial Revolution – dreams of domestic comfort and refuge, and anxieties about how entrapping that comfort could be. Moving from Ibsen to Chekhov and onwards into later plays in which the reality of ‘Realism’ comes under scrutiny, this is a book to dip into before a performance or to study during a class.
Drama

Rooms in Dramatic Realism

Author: Fred Miller Robinson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 114

View: 885

Dramatic Realism, since its birth in the hectic late years of the nineteenth century, gave theatrical and thematic energy to the interaction between a play’s text and the way that it looked on the stage. Characters began to find themselves in rooms and settings that played an active and changing role in the drama, and their dialogue and reactions evolved in time with these changes. As life itself became more elaborate during the 20th Century, so these rooms were invaded and then defined by the outside world. Fred Miller Robinson’s enjoyable and stimulating essays on this enduring genre tackle the dreams and anxieties of the middles classes of the Industrial Revolution – dreams of domestic comfort and refuge, and anxieties about how entrapping that comfort could be. Moving from Ibsen to Chekhov and onwards into later plays in which the reality of ‘Realism’ comes under scrutiny, this is a book to dip into before a performance or to study during a class.
Performing Arts

Women in Irish Drama

Author: M. Sihra

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 241

View: 914

Featuring original essays by leading scholars in the field, this book explores the immense legacy of women playwrights in Irish theatre since the beginning of theTwentieth century. Chapters consider the intersecting contexts of gender, sexuality and the body in order to investigate the broader cultural, political and historical implications of representing 'woman' on the stage. In addition, a number of essays engage with representations of women by a selection of male playwrights in order to re-evaluate familiar contexts and traditions in Irish drama. Features a Foreword by Marina Carr and a useful appendix of Irish women playwrights and their works.
Performing Arts

Theatre History Studies 2017

Author: Sara Freeman

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 370

View: 299

Theatre History Studies is a peer-reviewed journal of theatre history and scholarship published annually since 1981 by the Mid-American Theatre Conference (MATC), a regional body devoted to theatre scholarship and practice.
Performing Arts

Modern Drama and the Rhetoric of Theater

Author: William B. Worthen

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 230

View: 887

The history of drama is typically viewed as a series of inert "styles." Tracing British and American stage drama from the 1880s onward, W. B. Worthen instead sees drama as the interplay of text, stage production, and audience. How are audiences manipulated? What makes drama meaningful? Worthen identifies three rhetorical strategies that distinguish an O'Neill play from a Yeats, or these two from a Brecht. Where realistic theater relies on the "natural" qualities of the stage scene, poetic theater uses the poet's word, the text, to control performance. Modern political theater, by contrast, openly places the audience at the center of its rhetorical designs, and the drama of the postwar period is shown to develop a range of post-Brechtian practices that make the audience the subject of the play. Worthen's book deserves the attention of any literary critic or serious theatergoer interested in the relationship between modern drama and the spectator. The history of drama is typically viewed as a series of inert "styles." Tracing British and American stage drama from the 1880s onward, W. B. Worthen instead sees drama as the interplay of text, stage production, and audience. How are audiences manipulated? What makes drama meaningful? Worthen identifies three rhetorical strategies that distinguish an O'Neill play from a Yeats, or these two from a Brecht. Where realistic theater relies on the "natural" qualities of the stage scene, poetic theater uses the poet's word, the text, to control performance. Modern political theater, by contrast, openly places the audience at the center of its rhetorical designs, and the drama of the postwar period is shown to develop a range of post-Brechtian practices that make the audience the subject of the play. Worthen's book deserves the attention of any literary critic or serious theatergoer interested in the relationship between modern drama and the spectator.
Drama

American Realism and American Drama, 1880-1940

Author: Brenda Murphy

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 232

View: 876

The importance of Native American realism is traced through a study of the evolution of dramatic theory from the early 1890s through World War I and the uniquely American innovations in realistic drama between world wars.
Performing Arts

What Media Classes Really Want to Discuss

Author: Greg Smith

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 168

View: 937

You probably already have a clear idea of what a "discussion guide for students" is: a series of not-very-interesting questions at the end of a textbook chapter. Instead of triggering thought-provoking class discussion, all too often these guides are time-consuming and ineffective. This is not that kind of discussion guide. What Media Classes Really Want To Discuss focuses on topics that introductory textbooks generally ignore, although they are prominent in students’ minds. Using approachable prose, this book will give students a more precise critical language to discuss “common sense” phenomena about media. The book acknowledges that students begin introductory film and television courses thinking they already know a great deal about the subject. What Media Classes Really Want To Discuss provides students with a solid starting point for discussing their assumptions critically and encourages the reader to argue with the book, furthering the 'discussion' on media in everyday life and in the classroom.
Drama

Our Dramatic Heritage: Reactions to realism

Author: Philip G. Hill

Publisher: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 384

View: 275

A multi-volume series that surveys European drama from ancient Greece to the mid-twentieth century.
Drama

Realism and the American Dramatic Tradition

Author: William W. Demastes

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 290

View: 332

This book reconsiders realism on the American stage by addressing the great variety and richness of the plays that form the American theatre canon.
Performing Arts

Twenty-First Century Drama

Author: Siân Adiseshiah

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 348

View: 980

Within this landmark collection, original voices from the field of drama provide rich analysis of a selection of the most exciting and remarkable plays and productions of the twenty-first century. But what makes the drama of the new millenium so distinctive? Which events, themes, shifts, and paradigms are marking its stages? Kaleidoscopic in scope, Twenty-First Century Drama: What Happens Now creates a broad, rigorously critical framework for approaching the drama of this period, including its forms, playwrights, companies, institutions, collaborative projects, and directors. The collection has a deliberately British bent, examining established playwrights – such as Churchill, Brenton, and Hare – alongside a new generation of writers – including Stephens, Prebble, Kirkwood, Bartlett, and Kelly. Simultaneously international in scope, it engages with significant new work from the US, Japan, India, Australia, and the Netherlands, to reflect a twenty-first century context that is fundamentally globalized. The volume’s central themes – the financial crisis, austerity, climate change, new forms of human being, migration, class, race and gender, cultural politics and issues of nationhood – are mediated through fresh, cutting-edge perspectives.
Drama

Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

Author: Michael Y. Bennett

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 56

View: 663

Edward Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? shocked audiences and critics alike with its assault on decorum. At base though, the play is simply a love story: an examination of a long-wedded life, filled with the hopes, dreams, disappointments, and pain that accompany the passing of many years together. While the ethos of the play is tragicomic, it is the anachronistic, melodramatic secret object—the nonexistent "son"—that upends the audience’s sense of theatrical normalcy. The mean and vulgar bile spewed among the characters hides these elements, making it feel like something entirely "new." As Michael Y. Bennett reveals, the play is the same emperor, just wearing new clothes. In short, it is straight out of the grand tradition of living room drama: Ibsen, Chekhov, Glaspell, Hellmann, O’Neill, Wilder, Miller, Williams, and Albee.
Drama

Realism in the Drama

Author: Hugh Skyes Davies

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 128

View: 882

Originally published in 1934, this book contains the text of the Le Bas prize Essay for the same year on the subject of realism in drama. Davies reviews dramas from the ancient Greeks to the nineteenth century and how they addressed realism in theory and in practice. This book will be of value to anyone with an interest in the history of the theatre and the overlap of truth and fiction.
Literary Criticism

Rereading Shepard

Author: Leonard Wilcox

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 229

View: 143

Rereading Shepard draws together 13 original theoretical perspectives on one of America's most important contemporary playwrights. Representing a range of critical appraoches - including semiotics, deconstruction, and feminism - the essays address recent debates emerging in Shepard criticism. These include the status of Shepard's texts within the modernist tradition on the one hand and a developing post-modernism on the other, and the feminist debate over Shepard's drama - does it reinforce a masculinist world or does it provide some oppositional stance toward patriarchal 'master narratives'?
Literary Criticism

Beyond Documentary Realism

Author: Cyrielle Garson

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 398

View: 789

Verbatim theatre, a type of performance based on actual words spoken by ''real people'', has been at the heart of a remarkable and unexpected renaissance of the genre in Great Britain since the mid-nineties. The central aim of the book is to critically explore and account for the relationship between contemporary British verbatim theatre and realism whilst questioning the much-debated mediation of the real in theses theatre practices.
Performing Arts

Television Aesthetics and Style

Author: Steven Peacock

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 352

View: 200

Although Film Studies has successfully (re)turned attention to matters of style and interpretation, its sibling discipline has left the territory uncharted - until now. The question of how television operates on a stylistic level has been critically underexplored, despite being fundamental to our viewing experience. This significant new work redresses a vital gap in Television Studies by engaging with the stylistic dynamics of TV; exploring the aesthetic properties and values of both the medium and particular types of output (specific programmes); and raising important questions about the way we judge television as both cultural artifact and art form. Television Aesthetics and Style provides a unique and vital intervention in the field, raising key questions about television's artistic properties and possibilities. Through a series of case-studies by internationally renowned scholars, the collection takes a radical step forward in understanding TV's stylistic achievements.
Literary Criticism

The Methuen Drama Guide to Contemporary American Playwrights

Author: Christopher Innes

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 480

View: 962

Unrivalled in its coverage of recent work and writers, The Methuen Drama Guide to Contemporary American Playwrights surveys and analyses the breadth, vitality and development of theatrical work to emerge from America over the last fifty years. This authoritative guide leads you through the work of 25 major contemporary American playwrights, discussing more than 140 plays in detail. Written by a team of 25 eminent international scholars, each chapter provides: · a biographical introduction to the playwright's work; · a survey and concise analysis of the writer's most important plays; · a discussion of their style, dramaturgical concerns and critical reception; · a bibliography of published plays and a select list of critical works. Among the many Tony, Obie and Pulitzer prize-winning playwrights included are Sam Shepard, Tony Kushner, Suzan-Lori Parks, August Wilson, Paula Vogel and Neil LaBute. The abundance of work analysed enables fresh, illuminating conclusions to be drawn about the development of contemporary American playwriting.
Performing Arts

Theatre, Performance and Cognition

Author: Rhonda Blair

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 256

View: 217

Theatre, Performance and Cognition introduces readers to the key debates, areas of research, and applications of the cognitive sciences to the humanities, and to theatre and performance in particular. It features the most exciting work being done at the intersection of theatre and cognitive science, containing both selected scientific studies that have been influential in the field, each introduced and contextualised by the editors, together with related scholarship from the field of theatre and performance that demonstrates some of the applications of the cognitive sciences to actor training, the rehearsal room and the realm of performance more generally. The three sections consider the principal areas of research and application in this interdisciplinary field, starting with a focus on language and meaning-making in which Shakespeare's work and Tom Stoppard's Arcadia are considered. In the second part which focuses on the body, chapters consider applications for actor and dance training, while the third part focuses on dynamic ecologies, of which the body is a part.
Literary Criticism

American Drama of the Twentieth Century

Author: Gerald M. Berkowitz

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 312

View: 645

In this book Professor Berkowitz studies the diversity of American drama from the stylistic, experimental plays of O'Neill, through verse, tragedy and community theatre, to the theatre of the 1990s. The discussions range through dramatists, plays, genres and themes, with full supporting appendix material. It also examines major dramatists such as Eugene O'Neill, Arthur Miller, Sam Shephard, Tennessee Williams and August Wilson and covers not only the Broadway scene but also off Broadway movements and fringe theatres and such subjects as women's and African-American drama.
Performing Arts

Eloquent Gestures

Author: Roberta E. Pearson

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 184

View: 635

"Pearson writes beautifully, clearly, and entertainingly (with a touch of sardonic sarcasm here and there). This is the single best work centering on performance in film that I have read."--Thomas Gunning, author of D. W. Griffith and the Origins of American Narrative Film
Biography & Autobiography

J.O. Francis, Realist Drama and Ethics

Author: Alyce von Rothkirch

Publisher: University of Wales Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 218

View: 986

This book rediscovers and re-evaluates the work of the Welsh dramatist J. O. Francis (1882–1954) and his contribution to the development of Welsh drama in the twentieth century. More than a prize-winning dramatist, whose plays were performed all over the world, Francis can also be described as one of the founding fathers of modern Welsh drama, whose work has helped establish theatrical realism on the Welsh stage. His creative non-fiction for the popular press and for radio gives a unique perspective on how Wales was seen through the eyes of a perceptive London-Welsh observer. Using much previously unpublished material, this volume is an excellent introduction to one of Wales’s foremost dramatists, and is innovative in the way that it creates a picture of the amateur dramatic scene of south Wales (1920–40) based on sound statistical analysis of available evidence. It situates Francis’s work in its cultural context and brings this exciting period in Welsh cultural history to life in its introduction to a new audience.