Science

Sedimentary Petrology

Author: Maurice E. Tucker

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 272

View: 719

The earlier editions of this book have been used by successivegenerations of students for more than 20 years, and it is thestandard text on the subject in most British universities and manyothers throughout the world. The study of sediments and sedimentary rocks continues to be acore topic in the Earth Sciences and this book aims to provide aconcise account of their composition, mineralogy, textures,structures, diagenesis and depositional environments. This latest edition is noteworthy for the inclusion of 16 plateswith 54 colour photomicrographs of sedimentary rocks inthin-section. These bring sediments to life and show their beautyand colorful appearance down the microscope; they will aid thestudent enormously in laboratory petrographic work. The text hasbeen revised where necessary and the reference and further readinglists brought up-to-date. New tables have been included to helpundergraduates with rock and thin-section description andinterpretation. New 16-page colour section will mean students do not need tobuy Longman Atlas All illustrations redrawn to higher standard Complete revision of text - new material on sedimentarygeochemistry, etc
Science

Petrology of Sedimentary Rocks

Author: Sam Boggs, Jr.

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page:

View: 404

This textbook outlines the physical, chemical, and biologic properties of the major sedimentary rocks, as revealed by petrographic microscopy, geochemical techniques, and field study. It covers the mineralogy, chemistry, textures, and sedimentary structures that characterise sedimentary rocks, and relates these features to the depositional origin of the rocks and their subsequent alteration by diagenetic processes during burial. In addition to detailed sections on siliciclastic and carbonate rocks, it also discusses evaporites, cherts, iron-rich sedimentary rocks, phosphorites, and carbonaceous sedimentary rocks such as oil shales. This second edition maintains the comprehensive treatment of sedimentary petrography and petrology provided in the first edition, and has been updated with new concepts and cutting-edge techniques like cathodoluminescence imaging of sedimentary rocks and backscattered electron microscopy. It is ideal for advanced undergraduate and graduate courses in sedimentary petrology, and is a key reference for researchers and professional petroleum geoscientists.
Science

Petrology of the Sedimentary Rocks

Author: J. Greensmith

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 270

View: 915

In the 75 years of the existence of this book the content and boundaries of sedimentary petrology have increased enormously. It is doubtful if there are any areas of the subject described by the original authors which have remained untouched by the relatively recent onslaught by countless sedimentologists, aided by a veritable armoury of sophisticated techniques. Particular areas have always waxed and waned in popularity and some subjects, such as heavy mineral studies which have been successively popular, then unpopular, appear of late to have had a new lease on life. The development and application of relatively old techniques, but now used in a sedimentological context, often brings an upsurge and revival of interest in some rocks. Isotope work has now become an integral part of the study of pelagic and phosphatic sediments, and carbonate cements. An understanding of burial diagenesis, a much neglected area, is slowly coming to the fore as electron microscopes and X-rays delve into the mineralogical and textural complexities of ancient sediments. Yet, despite the 'zapping' of minerals with electron beams and generating gases to pass into a mass spectrometer, to paraphrase an erstwhile research student of mine, the danger of this approach is that materials are analysed with scant regard to field relationships or petrographic control, thus much genetic information is missing when interpretations are attempted. Petrography is far from being archaic.