Social Science

Seeing Cities Through Big Data

Author: Piyushimita (Vonu) Thakuriah

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 559

View: 963

This book introduces the latest thinking on the use of Big Data in the context of urban systems, including research and insights on human behavior, urban dynamics, resource use, sustainability and spatial disparities, where it promises improved planning, management and governance in the urban sectors (e.g., transportation, energy, smart cities, crime, housing, urban and regional economies, public health, public engagement, urban governance and political systems), as well as Big Data’s utility in decision-making, and development of indicators to monitor economic and social activity, and for urban sustainability, transparency, livability, social inclusion, place-making, accessibility and resilience.
Business & Economics

Big Data for Regional Science

Author: Laurie A Schintler

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 350

View: 540

Recent technological advancements and other related factors and trends are contributing to the production of an astoundingly large and rapidly accelerating collection of data, or ‘Big Data’. This data now allows us to examine urban and regional phenomena in ways that were previously not possible. Despite the tremendous potential of big data for regional science, its use and application in this context is fraught with issues and challenges. This book brings together leading contributors to present an interdisciplinary, agenda-setting and action-oriented platform for research and practice in the urban and regional community. This book provides a comprehensive, multidisciplinary and cutting-edge perspective on big data for regional science. Chapters contain a collection of research notes contributed by experts from all over the world with a wide array of disciplinary backgrounds. The content is organized along four themes: sources of big data; integration, processing and management of big data; analytics for big data; and, higher level policy and programmatic considerations. As well as concisely and comprehensively synthesising work done to date, the book also considers future challenges and prospects for the use of big data in regional science. Big Data for Regional Science provides a seminal contribution to the field of regional science and will appeal to a broad audience, including those at all levels of academia, industry, and government.
City planning

Seeing the Better City

Author: Charles R. Wolfe

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: City planning

Page:

View: 234

In order to understand and improve cities today, personal observation remains as important as ever. While big data, digital mapping, and simulated cityscapes are valuable tools for understanding urban space, using them without on-the-ground, human impressions risks creating places that do not reflect authentic local context. This volume brings our attention back to the real world right in front of us, focusing it once more on the sights, sounds, and experiences of place in order to craft policies, plans, and regulations to shape better urban environments. Through clear prose and vibrant photographs, Charles Wolfe shows those who experience cities how they might catalog the influences of urban form, neighborhood dynamics, public transportation, and myriad other basic city elements that impact their daily lives. He then shares insights into how they can use those observations to contribute to better planning and design decisions. Wolfe calls this the "urban diary" approach, and highlights how the perspective of the observer is key to understanding the dynamics of urban space. He concludes by offering contemporary examples and guidance on how to use carefully recorded and organized observations as a tool to create change in urban planning conversations and practice. From city-dwellers to elected officials involved in local planning and design issues, this book is an invaluable tool for constructive, creative discourse about improving urban space.
History

Ancient Cities of the Indus Valley Civilization

Author: Jonathan M. Kenoyer

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 260

View: 721

Offers a variety of perspectives on the Indus Valley civilization, covering important objects recovered during recent excavations at Harappa, and recent archaeological discoveries on South Asian societies and ancient technologies.
Science

Seeing in the Dark

Author: Timothy Ferris

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 379

View: 712

The author explores how backyard stargazers are changing our knowledge of the universe, recounts his own experiences, and shares information on some of the more interesting things that can be seen in space.
Canada

The New City

Author: John Lorinc

Publisher: Penguin Books Canada

ISBN:

Category: Canada

Page: 378

View: 544

Shaped by immigration, and demographics, our hub cities demonstrate what's best about Canada: our commitment to education, tolerance, culture, and innovation. Since the early 1990s, however, troubling trends have threatened to undermine our much-envied quality of life. In The New City, award-winning urban affairs writer John Lorinc offers a compelling vision of how to make Canada's metropolitan centres sustainable, livable, and competitive. Incisive and broad-ranging, this is a timely reminder that all Canadians must confront urban issues if the country is to succeed in the tumultuous economy of the 21st century.
Computer software

Dataquest

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Computer software

Page:

View: 479

City planning

Planning

Author: American Society of Planning Officials

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: City planning

Page:

View: 280

Political Science

The Smart Enough City

Author: Ben Green

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 240

View: 555

Why technology is not an end in itself, and how cities can be “smart enough,” using technology to promote democracy and equity. Smart cities, where technology is used to solve every problem, are hailed as futuristic urban utopias. We are promised that apps, algorithms, and artificial intelligence will relieve congestion, restore democracy, prevent crime, and improve public services. In The Smart Enough City, Ben Green warns against seeing the city only through the lens of technology; taking an exclusively technical view of urban life will lead to cities that appear smart but under the surface are rife with injustice and inequality. He proposes instead that cities strive to be “smart enough”: to embrace technology as a powerful tool when used in conjunction with other forms of social change—but not to value technology as an end in itself. In a technology-centric smart city, self-driving cars have the run of downtown and force out pedestrians, civic engagement is limited to requesting services through an app, police use algorithms to justify and perpetuate racist practices, and governments and private companies surveil public space to control behavior. Green describes smart city efforts gone wrong but also smart enough alternatives, attainable with the help of technology but not reducible to technology: a livable city, a democratic city, a just city, a responsible city, and an innovative city. By recognizing the complexity of urban life rather than merely seeing the city as something to optimize, these Smart Enough Cities successfully incorporate technology into a holistic vision of justice and equity.
Architecture

Bulletin

Author: Michigan Society of Architects

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page:

View: 622

Including National architect.
Cities and towns

Municipal Reference Library Notes

Author: New York Public Library. Municipal Reference Library

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Cities and towns

Page:

View: 682