Dublin (Ireland)

Silver in Georgian Dublin

Author: Alison Fitzgerald

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Dublin (Ireland)

Page: 256

View: 551

Georgian Dublin is synonymous with a period of unprecedented expansion in the market for luxury goods. At a time when new commodities, novel technologies and fashionable imports seduced elite society, silver enjoyed an established association with gentility and prestige. Earlier studies have focused predominantly on the issue of style. This book considers the demand for silver goods in Georgian Ireland from the perspectives of makers, retailers and consumers. It discusses the practical and symbolic uses of silverware, interpreted through contemporary guild accounts, inventories, trade ephemera and culinary manuscripts. For the first time the activities of Dublin's goldsmiths and their customers are considered in the context of the British Isles, acknowledging Dublin's 'second city' status in relation to London. How did the availability of new products like English porcelain and Sheffield Plate affect the demand for silver in Dublin, and how did silver imports from London affect the Dublin trade? To what extent do the practices of Dublin goldsmiths mirror their North American counterparts seeking to infer associations with the fashionable metropolis of London? Drawing on an extensive range of documentary and object evidence this wide-ranging analysis considers the context in which silver goods were made, used, valued and displayed in Georgian Ireland.
Silverwork, Georgian

Studies in Irish Georgian Silver

Author: Alison Fitzgerald

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Silverwork, Georgian

Page: 288

View: 523

Irish silver, for long renowned among collectors and connoisseurs, is increasingly being considered as an aspect of the material world of the past. Its making, acquisition and use tells much about past attitudes and behaviour. At the same time, careful examination of surviving articles not only adds to appreciation of the design and craftsmanship but also to Ireland's participation in international fashions. This volume, with new research by established and emerging scholars from Ireland and the UK, advances the study across a broad range. The contributions examine the circumstances in which silver objects were made, sold, valued and dispersed in Georgian Ireland. It considers specialized branches of the trade including the production of freedom boxes and jewellery, the sourcing of metals and materials, the value of inventories as evidence and regional patterns and preferences. This book builds on recent literature on the history of silver, second-hand markets, guilds and luxury goods, to recover and reconsider Ireland's silversmithing.
History

Georgian Dublin

Author: Gillian O'Brien

Publisher: Four Courts PressLtd

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 203

View: 818

This collection looks at the less obvious remnants of Dublinâ??s Georgian past - the literature, the publishing industry, the clothes, the music and the hobbies associated with this period. The contributors are: Gillian Oâ??Brien (St Patrickâ??s College, DCU) Dublin in the late Georgian period; Sarah Foster (Crawford College) Consumption and economic nationalism in Dublin, 1720â??85; Vandra Costello (UCD) Recreation in Georgian Dublin; Lisa Marie Griffith (TCD) The position of lord mayor, 1760â??1800; Colum Kenny (DCU) Kingâ??s Innsâ?? move to Constitution Hill; Niamh Howlin (UCD) Special juries in Dublin, 1725â??1833; Finola Oâ??Kane (UCD) Dublinâ??s Georgian suburbia; Alison Fitzgerald (UCD) Goldsmiths in 18th-century Dublin; Aileen Douglas (TCD) Dublin in fiction of the later 18th century; Sharon Murphy (TCD) Maria Edgeworthâ??s representations of Georgian Dublin; Julie Anne Stevens (St Patrickâ??s, DCU) Perspectives of Georgian Dublin; W.J. McCormack (Worth Library) Sources for the library of Edward Worth; Johanna Archbold (TCD) James Moore and the publication of the Encylopaedia Britannica, 1790â??1800; Andreas Boldt (NUIM) The Graves family; Michelle Mangan, Dublin and Limerick during the 1832 cholera epidemic.
History

The First Irish Cities

Author: David Dickson

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 430

The untold story of a group of Irish cities and their remarkable development before the age of industrialization A backward corner of Europe in 1600, Ireland was transformed during the following centuries. This was most evident in the rise of its cities, notably Dublin and Cork. David Dickson explores ten urban centers and their patterns of physical, social, and cultural evolution, relating this to the legacies of a violent past, and he reflects on their subsequent partial eclipse. Beautifully illustrated, this account reveals how the country’s cities were distinctive and—through the Irish diaspora—influential beyond Ireland’s shores.
Silverwork

Irish Georgian Silver

Author: Douglas Bennett

Publisher: Weidenfeld & Nicolson

ISBN:

Category: Silverwork

Page: 369

View: 908

Reference

Tracing Your Irish Ancestors 5th Edition

Author: John Grenham

Publisher: Gill & Macmillan Ltd

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 688

View: 327

With online access to records making it easy for most people of Irish origin to trace their family background, there has never been a better time to research your Irish family history. This guide contains everything you need to know to speed up the process, making sense of the deluge of online material and guiding you towards records and methods you may not have known existed. This 5th edition of John Grenham’s bestselling and seminal text is expanded, updated and indexed to make it easier to use than ever before. As well as guides to new developments online and in DNA testing, find out where to start if you’re a beginner and to how to access and understand registry office records, census records, church and property records, and county-by-county source lists. It is an essential part of any Irish family history project. ‘John Grenham has written a multi-purpose book which can be used by the absolute beginner, the keen amateur and the more experienced genealogist.’ The Irish Times
History

Dublin

Author: David Dickson

Publisher: Profile Books

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 1396

View: 867

Dublin has many histories: for a thousand years a modest urban settlement on the quiet waters of the Irish Sea, for the last four hundred it has experienced great - and often astonishing - change. Once a fulcrum of English power in Ireland, it was also the location for the 1916 insurrection that began the rapid imperial retreat. That moment provided Joyce with the setting for the greatest modernist novel of the age, Ulysses, capping a cultural heritage which became an economic resource for the brash 'Tiger Town' of the 1990s. David Dickson's magisterial survey of the city's history brings Dublin to life from its medieval incarnation through the glamorous eighteenth century, when it reigned as the 'Naples of the North', through to the millennium. He reassesses 120 years of Anglo-Irish Union, in which Dublin - while economic capital of Ireland - remained, as it does today, a place in which rival creeds and politics struggled for supremacy. Dublin reveals the rich and intriguing story behind the making of a capital city.
Silverwork

Irish Silver

Author: Robert Wyse Jackson

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Silverwork

Page: 85

View: 884

History

Champagne and Silver Buckles

Author: Joseph Robins

Publisher: Lilliput PressLtd

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 209

View: 339

A history of the headquarters of British rule in Ireland. Examines the social and ceremonial life of the Viceregal Court, and looks at the individuals who performed at the Castle from the onset of English administration until the transfer of power to
Furniture

Metropolitan Furniture of the Georgian Years

Author: F. Lewis Hinckley

Publisher: New York University Press

ISBN:

Category: Furniture

Page: 203

View: 114

According to all British lay authorities on Old English Furntiture, all of the bona fide Georgian masterpieces illustrated in this volume were designed and executed somewhere in England. Through extensive and detailed comparative studies, Hinckley contradicts popular theory and maintains that the masterpieces were produced in Dublin, Ireland. This edition contains photos of some 322 examples (more than five times the number of illustrated examples than first appeared in the 1953 volume). Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR