Law

Legislation and Statutory Interpretation

Author: William N. Eskridge (Jr.)

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 436

View: 903

Suitable for students or practitioners, this authoritative overview of the legislative process and statutory interpretation moves smoothly and understandably between the theoretical and the practical. It contains in-depth discussion of such topics as theories of legislation and representation, electoral and legislative structures, extrinsic sources for statutory interpretation, and substantive canons of statutory interpretation. Reap the benefits of the authors' experience, opinions, and insight and gain a working knowledge of the area.
Law

Dynamic Statutory Interpretation

Author: William N. Eskridge

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 460

View: 867

Contrary to traditional theories of statutory interpretation, which ground statutes in the original legislative text or intent, legal scholar William Eskridge argues that statutory interpretation changes in response to new political alignments, new interpreters, and new ideologies. It does so, first of all, because it involves richer authoritative texts than does either common law or constitutional interpretation: statutes are often complex and have a detailed legislative history. Second, Congress can, and often does, rewrite statutes when it disagrees with their interpretations; and agencies and courts attend to current as well as historical congressional preferences when they interpret statutes. Third, since statutory interpretation is as much agency-centered as judgecentered and since agency executives see their creativity as more legitimate than judges see theirs, statutory interpretation in the modern regulatory state is particularly dynamic. Eskridge also considers how different normative theories of jurisprudence--liberal, legal process, and antiliberal--inform debates about statutory interpretation. He explores what theory of statutory interpretation--if any--is required by the rule of law or by democratic theory. Finally, he provides an analytical and jurisprudential history of important debates on statutory interpretation.
Law

Cases and Materials on Legislation and Regulation

Author: William N. Eskridge (Jr.)

Publisher: West Academic Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 1262

View: 190

The Fifth Edition offers a comprehensive introduction to legislation and administration in the regulatory state. Importantly, it features new chapters addressing regulation, including constitutional structure, the types of agencies and their tools for statutory implementation under the Administrative Procedure Act, oversight and review of agency action by all three branches, and judicial deference to agency interpretations. The Fifth Edition also updates the book's classic and path-breaking treatment of the theories and practice of statutory interpretation. It devotes expanded attention to a range of textualist theories, dictionary use, and reliance on language and substantive canons, as well as providing the key statutory text as a preface to major cases. And the new edition contains an in-depth introduction to theories of legislation, the legislative process, representational structures, campaign finance, regulation of lobbying, and direct democracy. The Fifth Edition is perfect for 1L Legislation and Legislation-Regulation ("LegReg") courses, and it remains the go-to book for upper level courses.
Law

The Theory and Practice of Statutory Interpretation

Author: Frank B. Cross

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 248

View: 344

Today, statutes make up the bulk of the relevant law heard in federal courts and arguably represent the most important source of American law. The proper means of judicial interpretation of those statutes have been the subject of great attention and dispute over the years. This book provides new insights into the theory and practice of statutory interpretation by courts. Cross offers the first comprehensive analysis of statutory interpretation and includes extensive empirical evidence of Supreme Court practice. He offers a thorough review of the active disputes over the appropriate approaches to statutory interpretations, namely whether courts should rely exclusively on the text or also examine the legislative history. The book then considers the use of these approaches by the justices of the recent Rehnquist Court and the degree to which they were applied by the justices, either sincerely or in pursuit of an ideological agenda.