Education

Intellectual Creativity in First-Year Composition Classes

Author: Heidi Wall Burns

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 156

View: 497

Today’s first year composition classrooms are largely reflective of the writing pedagogy that has been used for the last 200 years. Unfortunately, this methodology does not meet the research or writing needs of today’s college and university students. Burns and MacBride were determined to make their first year composition courses more relevant to their students and sought a way to revolutionize their syllabus to do so. Building on the work of Tom Romono, Nancy Mack, Camille Allen, Sirpa Grierson, Melinda Putz (and others), Burns and MacBride set out to determine if a multigenre research project could better teach their students research, writing, and critical thinking skills than a traditional research-based essay. The findings of their semester-long study indicated that not only does a MGRP teach these skills, but it far surpasses a traditional essay in teaching engagement, intellectual creativity, and transferable writing skills. Burns and MacBride demonstrate two different ways to integrate a multigenre research project into the college composition classroom.
Education

Working Toward Racial Equity in First-Year Composition

Author: Renee DeLong

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 156

View: 965

This book presents the authors’ attempts to interrogate the ways that white institutional, pedagogical, and curricular heteronormativity affects equity in writing instruction at Two Year Colleges. Written from a wide range of subject and identity positions, this volume explores issues that arise among students inside historically white-dominant classrooms, among faculty as curriculum and hiring decisions are made, and among colleagues when they attempt to engage the wider institution in equity work. Aiming to significantly change how urban Community College writing instruction is delivered in this country, the book operates on the principle that equity is essential to successful writing pedagogy, curricular development, and student success.
Language Arts & Disciplines

First-Year Composition

Author: Deborah Coxwell-Teague

Publisher: Parlor Press LLC

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 422

View: 963

First-Year Composition: From Theory to Practice’s combination of theory and practice provides readers an opportunity to hear twelve of the leading theorists in composition studies answer, in their own voices, the key question of what it is they hope to accomplish in a first-year composition course. In addition, these chapters, and the accompanying syllabi, provide rich insights into the classroom practices of these theorists.
Education

Stories of Mentoring

Author: Michelle F. Eble

Publisher: Parlor Press LLC

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 348

View: 600

Describes mentoring of teachers and scholars in the field of composition and rhetoric.
Language Arts & Disciplines

Dialogue on Writing

Author: Geraldine DeLuca

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 504

View: 967

Designed for courses on theories and methods of teaching college writing, this text is distinguished by its emphasis on giving teachers a foundation of knowledge for teaching writing to a diverse student body. As such, it is equally relevant for teacher training in basic writing, ESL, and first year composition, the premise being that in most colleges and universities today teachers of each of these types of courses encounter similar student populations and teaching challenges. Many instructors compile packets of articles for this course because they cannot find an appropriate collection in one volume. This text fills that gap. It includes in one volume: *the latest thinking about teaching and tutoring basic writing, ESL, and first year composition students; *seminal articles, carefully selected to be accessible to those new to the field, by classic authors in the field of composition and ESL, as well as a number of new voices; *attention to both theory and practice, but with an emphasis on practice; and *articles about non-traditional students, multiculturalism, and writing across the disciplines. The text includes suggestions for pedagogy and invitations for exploration to engage readers in reflection and in applications to their own teaching practice.

Author: Michael Carter

Publisher: SIU Press

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 480

Language Arts & Disciplines

Class in the Composition Classroom

Author: Genesea M. Carter

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 369

View: 986

Class in the Composition Classroom considers what college writing instructors should know about their working-class students—their backgrounds, experiences, identities, learning styles, and skills—in order to support them in the classroom, across campus, and beyond. In this volume, contributors explore the nuanced and complex meaning of “working class” and the particular values these college writers bring to the classroom. The real college experiences of veterans, rural Midwesterners, and trade unionists show that what it means to be working class is not obvious or easily definable. Resisting outdated characterizations of these students as underprepared and dispensing with a one-size-fits-all pedagogical approach, contributors address how region and education impact students, explore working-class pedagogy and the ways in which it can reify social class in teaching settings, and give voice to students’ lived experiences. As community colleges and universities seek more effective ways to serve working-class students, and as educators, parents, and politicians continue to emphasize the value of higher education for students of all financial and social backgrounds, conversations must take place among writing instructors and administrators about how best to serve and support working-class college writers. Class in the Composition Classroom will help writing instructors inside and outside the classroom prepare all their students for personal, academic, and professional communication. Contributors: Aaron Barlow, ​Cori Brewster, ​Patrick Corbett, ​Harry Denny, Cassandra Dulin, ​Miriam Eisenstein Ebsworth, ​Mike Edwards, ​Rebecca Fraser, ​Brett Griffiths, ​Anna Knutson, ​Liberty Kohn, ​Nancy Mack, ​Holly Middleton, ​Robert Mundy, ​Missy Nieveen Phegley, ​Jacqueline Preston, ​James E. Romesburg, ​Edie-Marie Roper, Aubrey Schiavone, Christie Toth, ​Gail G. Verdi
Language Arts & Disciplines

Teaching Information Literacy and Writing Studies

Author: Grace Veach

Publisher: Purdue University Press

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 310

View: 815

This volume, edited by Grace Veach, explores leading approaches to foregrounding information literacy in first-year college writing courses. Chapters describe cross-disciplinary efforts underway across higher education, as well as innovative approaches of both writing professors and librarians in the classroom. This seminal work unpacks the disciplinary implications for information literacy and writing studies as they encounter one another in theory and practice, during a time when "fact" or "truth" is less important than fitting a predetermined message. Topics include reading and writing through the lens of information literacy, curriculum design, specific writing tasks, transfer, and assessment.
Education

Tell Me a Story

Author: Anthony Tate Fulton

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 142

View: 569

This book attempts to harness the power of stories to help students grow and develop as writers. It argues that stories and narratives can be utilized in the composition classroom, specifically first-year composition (FYC) to break down barriers. Stories and narratives can help students overcome academic, personal, and creative barriers.
Language Arts & Disciplines

Vision, Rhetoric, and Social Action in the Composition Classroom

Author: Kristie S. Fleckenstein

Publisher: SIU Press

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 216

View: 294

In this innovative volume, Kristie S. Fleckenstein explores how the intersection of vision, rhetoric, and writing pedagogy in the classroom can help students become compassionate citizens who participate in the world as they become more critically aware of the world. Fleckenstein argues that all social action—behavior designed to increase human dignity, value, and quality of life—depends on a person’s repertoire of visual and rhetorical habits. To develop this repertoire in students, the author advocates the incorporation of visual habits—or ways of seeing—into a language-based pedagogical approach in the writing classroom. According to Fleckenstein, interweaving the visual and rhetorical in composition pedagogy enables students to more readily perceive the need for change, while arming them with the abilities and desire to enact it. The author addresses social action from the perspective of three visual habits: spectacle, which fosters disengagement; animation, or fusing body with meaning; and antinomy, which invites the invention of new realities. Fleckenstein then examines the ways in which particular visual habits interact with rhetorical habits and with classroom methods, resulting in the emergence of various forms of social action. To enhance the understanding of the concepts she discusses, the author represents the intertwining relationships of vision, rhetoric, and writing pedagogy graphically as what she calls symbiotic knots. In tracing the modes of social action privileged by a visual habit and a teacher’s pedagogical choices, Fleckenstein attends particularly to the experiences of students who have been traditionally barred from participation in the public sphere because of gender, race, or class. The book culminates in a call for visually and rhetorically robust writing pedagogies. In Vision, Rhetoric, and Social Action in the Composition Classroom, Fleckenstein combines classic methods of rhetorical teaching with fresh perspectives to provide a unique guide for initiating important improvements in teaching social action. The result is a remarkable volume that empowers teachers to best inspire students to take part in their world at that most crucial moment when they are discovering it.
Language Arts & Disciplines

Historical Studies of Writing Program Administration

Author: Barbara L'Eplattenier

Publisher: Parlor Press LLC

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 316

View: 851

Historical Studies of Writing Program Administration: Individuals, Communities, and the Formation of a Discipline collects essays that shine new light on the early history of writing program administration. Broad in scope, the book illuminates the development of the profession in the narratives of the individuals who helped form the discipline prior to the emergence of the Council of Writing Program Administrators in 1976, including those narratives of Gertrude Buck and Laura J. Wylie, Edwin Hopkins, Regina Crandall, Rose Colby, George Jardine, Clara Stevens, Stith Thompson, and George Wykoff. Drawing from deep archival work, these narratives offer rare glimpses into writing program administration and the development of composition as a college requirement. In addition to eleven chapters from contributors, Historical Studies of Writing Program Administration includes a preface by Edward M. White, a concluding essay by Jeanne Gunner, interviews with Erika Lindemann and Kenneth Bruffee, and a detailed introduction by the editors, Barbara L'Eplattenier and Lisa Mastrangelo.
Literary Criticism

We Find Ourselves in Other People’s Stories

Author: Amy E. Robillard

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 100

View: 956

We Find Ourselves in Other People’s Stories: On Narrative Collapse and a Lifetime Search for Story is a collection of five essays that dissolves the boundary between personal writing and academic writing, a longstanding binary construct in the discipline of composition and writing studies, in order to examine the rhetorical effects of narrative collapse on the stories we tell about ourselves and others. Taken together, the essays theorize the relationships between language and violence, between narrative and dementia, between genre and certainty, and between writing and life.
Language Arts & Disciplines

Teachers on the Edge

Author: John Boe

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 512

View: 708

For over 25 years, the journal Writing on the Edge has published interviews with influential writers, teachers, and scholars. Now, Teachers on the Edge: The WOE Interviews, 1989–2017 collects the voices of 39 significant figures in writing studies, forming an accessible survey of the modern history of rhetoric and composition. In a conversational style, Teachers on the Edge encourages a remarkable group of teachers and scholars to tell the stories of their influences and interests, tracing the progress of their contributions. This engaging volume is invaluable to graduate students, writing teachers, and scholars of writing studies.
Reference

Creating a Transnational Space in the First Year Writing Classroom

Author: W. Ordeman

Publisher: Vernon Press

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 187

View: 428

During the first twenty years of the new millennium, many scholars turned their attention to translingualism, an idea that focuses on the merging of language in distinct social and spatial contexts to serve unique, mutually constitutive, and temporal purposes. This volume joins the more recent shift in pedagogical studies towards an altogether distinct phenomenon: transnationalism. By developing a framework for transnational pedagogical practice, this volume demonstrates the exclusive opportunities afforded to freshmen writers who write in transnational spaces that act as points of fusion for several cultural, lingual, and national identities. With reference to recent works on translingualism and transnationalism, this volume is an attempt to conceptualize effective writing pedagogy in freshman writing courses, which are becoming more and more transnational. It also provides educators and first year writing administrators with practical pedagogical tools to help them use their transnational spaces as a means of achieving their desired learning outcomes as well as teaching students threshold concepts of composition studies. This volume will be particularly useful for first year writing faculty at colleges and universities as well as writing program administrators to create a more effective curriculum that addresses these needs in classroom settings. All scholars with a doctorate in Rhetoric and Composition, English as a Second Language, Translation Studies, to name a few, will also find this a valuable resource.
Language Arts & Disciplines

Writing Spaces

Author: Dana Driscoll

Publisher: Parlor Press LLC

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 217

View: 505

Volumes in Writing Spaces: Readings on Writing offer multiple perspectives on a wide range of topics about writing. In each chapter, authors present their unique views, insights, and strategies for writing by addressing the undergraduate reader directly. Drawing on their own experiences, these teachers-as-writers invite students to join in the larger conversation about the craft of writing. Consequently, each essay functions as a standalone text that can easily complement other selected readings in first year writing or writing-intensive courses across the disciplines at any level. Volume 3 continues the tradition of previous volumes with topics such as voice and style in writing, rhetorical appeals, discourse communities, multimodal composing, visual rhetoric, credibility, exigency, working with personal experience in academic writing, globalized writing and rhetoric, constructing scholarly ethos, imitation and style, and rhetorical punctuation.
Social Science

International Perspectives on Teaching with Disability

Author: Michael S. Jeffress

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 292

View: 271

Efforts to reduce discrimination and increase diversity on campuses, coupled with shrinking budgets causing administrators to devote more resources toward recruiting and retaining students with disabilities, are fuelling an explosion of research in the area of inclusive education. An important focus that has been largely neglected is the place of teachers with disabilities in academe. International Perspectives on Teaching with Disability brings together 25 multi-disciplinary scholars with disabilities from Africa, Canada, the Caribbean, the UK, Israel and the United States to share their struggles and successes in teaching with disability. The 18 chapters are written largely from autoethnographic perspectives grounded in solid academic research but full of anecdotes and self-reflexive narratives that provide insights into the lived experiences of the authors. Woven into the narratives are discussions of the complexities of self-disclosure and self-advocacy; the varied—and often problematic—ways disability is experienced, perceived and discussed in society and in the classroom; the challenges of navigating academe with disability, the value of disability pedagogy, the positive student outcomes achieved by teaching through disability, as well as practical applications and lessons learned that will benefit educators, administrators and students preparing to become teachers. This book is written to champion the integral place and role of disabled educators in academe. Current educators with disability will be affirmed. Those with disability aspiring to become teachers will be encouraged. Temporarily able-bodied administrators and educators will be challenged. Everyone will be informed. This book will be a welcome addition to reading lists in a wide array of academic fields including: Education, Pedagogy, Disability Studies, Human Resources Management, and Sociology.
Language Arts & Disciplines

Beyond the Frontier, Volume III

Author: Jill Dahlman

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 232

View: 314

In these quickly changing times, this volume re-imagines the classroom after COVID-19. No one could have fathomed the multiple ways education would change when the country first entered into the pandemic in March, 2020. In this regard, this volume offers pedagogy that will create teaching opportunities in both virtual and physical classrooms. Ideas are meant to be shared and evolve into methods that work for both teachers and pupils.