History

Tales of the African Frontier

Author: John A. Hunter

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 308

View: 640

The colorful characters of East Africa's early colonial period walk across the pages of this powerful book by John Hunter and Dan Mannix. Meet Tippu Tib, the greatest of all slave traders and the man who owned the slave responsible for killing the elephant with the biggest tusks ever recorded. Read how Ewart Grogan walked from the Cape to Cairo and how Joseph Thompson faced not only the ferocious Masai but also incredible hardships during his explorations into the interior of East Africa. Find out how John Boyes, elephant poacher extraordinaire, declared himself king of the Wa-Kikuyu and how Robert Foran, the notorious Lado Enclave ivory poacher, cheated Belgian and British authorities alike.
Literary Criticism

Tales of the Barbarians

Author: Greg Woolf

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 192

View: 888

Tales of the Barbarians traces the creation of new mythologies in the wake of Roman expansion westward to the Atlantic, and offers the first application of modern ethnographic theory to ancient material. Investigates the connections between empire and knowledge at the turn of the millennia, and the creation of new histories in the Roman West Explores how ancient geography, local histories and the stories of wandering heroes were woven together by Greek scholars and local experts Offers a fresh perspective by examining passages from ancient writers in a new light
Literary Criticism

Failed Frontiersmen

Author: James J. Donahue

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 232

View: 578

In Failed Frontiersmen, James Donahue writes that one of the founding and most persistent mythologies of the United States is that of the American frontier. Looking at a selection of twentieth-century American male fiction writers—E. L. Doctorow, John Barth, Thomas Pynchon, Ishmael Reed, Gerald Vizenor, and Cormac McCarthy—he shows how they reevaluated the historical romance of frontier mythology in response to the social and political movements of the 1960s (particularly regarding the Vietnam War, civil rights, and the treatment of Native Americans). Although these writers focus on different moments in American history and different geographic locations, the author reveals their commonly held belief that the frontier mythology failed to deliver on its promises of cultural stability and political advancement, especially in the face of the multicultural crucible of the 1960s. Cultural Frames, Framing Culture American Literatures Initiative
Fairy tales

The Greenwood Encyclopedia of Folktales and Fairy Tales: Q-Z

Author: Donald Haase

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category: Fairy tales

Page: 1160

View: 846

Provides alphabetically arranged entries on folk and fairy tales from around the world, including information on authors, subjects, themes, characters, and national traditions.
Reference

The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture

Author: Harvey H. Jackson III

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 408

View: 548

What southerners do, where they go, and what they expect to accomplish in their spare time, their "leisure," reveals much about their cultural values, class and racial similarities and differences, and historical perspectives. This volume of The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture offers an authoritative and readable reference to the culture of sports and recreation in the American South, surveying the various activities in which southerners engage in their nonwork hours, as well as attitudes surrounding those activities. Seventy-four thematic essays explore activities from the familiar (porch sitting and fairs) to the essential (football and stock car racing) to the unusual (pool checkers and a sport called "fireballing"). In seventy-seven topical entries, contributors profile major sites associated with recreational activities (such as Dollywood, drive-ins, and the Appalachian Trail) and prominent sports figures (including Althea Gibson, Michael Jordan, Mia Hamm, and Hank Aaron). Taken together, the entries provide an engaging look at the ways southerners relax, pass time, celebrate, let loose, and have fun.
Literary Collections

Fighting for Britain

Author: David Killingray

Publisher: Boydell & Brewer Ltd

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 289

View: 921

The first major study of the experiences of the hundreds of thousands of African soldiers who served with the British army during the Second World War.
Literary Criticism

Southern Frontier Humor

Author: Ed Piacentino

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 237

View: 976

Since its inception in the early 1830s, southern frontier humor (also known as the humor of the Old Southwest) has had enduring appeal. The onset of the new millennium precipitated an impressive rejuvenation of scholarly interest. Southern Frontier Humor: New Approaches represents the next step in this revival, providing a series of essays with fresh perspectives and contexts. First, the book shows the importance of Henry Junius Nott, a virtually unknown and forgotten writer who mined many of the principal subjects, themes, tropes, and character types associated with southern frontier humor, followed by an essay addressing how this humor genre and its ideological impact helped to stimulate a national cultural revolution. Several essays focus on the genre’s legacy to the post-Civil War era, exploring intersections between southern frontier humor and southern local color writers—Joel Chandler Harris, Charles W. Chesnutt, and Sherwood Bonner. Mark Twain’s African American dialect piece “A True Story,” though employing some of the conventions of southern frontier humor, is reexamined as a transitional text, showing his shift to broader concerns, particularly in race portraiture. Essays also examine the evolution of the trickster from the Jack Tales to Hooper’s Simon Suggs to similar mountebanks in novels of John Kennedy Toole, Mark Childress, and Clyde Edgerton and transnational contexts, the latter exploring parallels between southern frontier humor and the Jamaican Anansi tales. Finally, the genre is situated contextually, using contemporary critical discourses, which are applied to G. W. Harris’s Sut Lovingood and to various frontier hunting stories.
Business & Economics

Tales from the Development Frontier

Author: Hinh T. Dinh

Publisher: World Bank Publications

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 552

View: 939

Tales from the Development Frontier presents analytical reviews and case studies that show how selected countries have developed light manufacturing to create jobs and foster prosperity. The focus is on China, a current powerhouse in light manufacturing, but the volume also analyzes a selection of countries in Africa and Asia.