Transportation

The A1 Steam Locomotive Trust Tornado - New Peppercorn Class A1, 2008 onwards

Author: Geoff Smith

Publisher: Haynes Publishing UK

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 160

View: 130

This is a Haynes Manual with a difference. Published in association with The A1 Steam Locomotive Trust, it explains the construction, operation and maintenance of 60163 Tornado, the new steam locomotive that attracts huge crowds wherever it appears. Based on the LNER Peppercorn Class A1 design, of which 49 were originally built but eventually all scrapped, Tornado is a magnificent and fully operational replica that is totally faithful to the original Peppercorn A1s in all respects except for modernisation to suit today's safety requirements. This manual about a unique steam locomotive will fascinate all railway enthusiasts as well as those who appreciate British engineering excellence.
History

Tornado

Author: Robert Jones

Publisher: Wharncliffe

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 139

'Tornado' is the official account of the building of Britain's first main line steam locomotive for 50 years. It details how it took a team of volunteers 18 years to raise more than 2-million to build it and its international headline-grabbing debut on the main line, with a royal visit thrown in for good measure.
Transportation

Tornado Class A1

Author: Geoff Smith

Publisher: Haynes Publishing UK

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 160

View: 433

This is a manual about the construction of 60163 Tornado, the new steam locomotive that has been making its first public runs in recent months. The locomotive has been built by the A1 Steam Locomotive Trust, a charitable trust founded in 1990 to build Tornado and possibly further locomotives. Tornado was conceived as an evolution of the LNER Peppercorn Class A1 class, incorporating improvements likely had steam continued, and changes for cost, safety, manufacturing and operational benefits, while replicating the original design's sound and appearance. Tornado, completely new-built, is considered the 50th Peppercorn A1, numbered next in the class after 60162, Saint Johnstoun, built in 1949. The 49 original Peppercorn A1s were built in Doncaster and Darlington for the London and North Eastern Railway (LNER). Tornado was built in the trust's Darlington works. The original 49 locomotives were scrapped by 1966 after an average service of 15 years. None survived into preservation, and Tornado fills a gap in the classes of restored steam locomotives that used to operate on the East Coast Main Line.
Transportation

The Quintinshill Conspiracy

Author: Adrian Searle

Publisher: Wharncliffe

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 224

View: 328

It was the railway's Titanic. A horrific crash involving five trains in which 230 died and 246 were injured, it remains the worst disaster in the long history of Britain's rail network.??The location was the isolated signal box at Quintinshill, on the Anglo-Scottish border near Gretna; the date, 22 May 1915. Amongst the dead and injured were women and children but most of the casualties were Scottish soldiers on their way to fight in the Gallipoli campaign. Territorials setting off for war on a distant battlefield were to die, not in battle, but on home soil – victims, it was said, of serious incompetence and a shoddy regard for procedure in the signal box, resulting in two signalmen being sent to prison. Startling new evidence reveals that the failures which led to the disaster were far more complex and wide-reaching than signalling negligence. Using previously undisclosed documents, the authors have been able to access official records from the time and have uncovered a?highly shocking and controversial truth behind what actually happened at Quintinshill and the extraordinary attempts to hide the truth.??As featured in Dumfries & Galloway Life magazine, January 2014.
Transportation

History of the East Coast Main Line

Author: Robin Jones

Publisher: The Crowood Press

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 300

View: 373

Since the mid-nineteenth century the East Coast Main Line has been one of the major routes from London to northern England and to Scotland. It has seen some of the greatest achievements in the railways, most notably the 'Flying Scotsman' becoming, in 1934, the first locomotive in the world to exceed 100mph and the 'Mallard' in 1938 claiming the as-yet-unbroken world speed record for steam locomotives of 126mph. The East Coast Main Line not only made history by facilitating an ever-faster link between two capital cities, it also provided an international stage for Britain's engineering marvels, inspiring many generations of schoolboys and adults alike. That was to continue after the end of the steam era on British Railways, with diesel and then electric traction setting a series of new records over the route. This new book looks at how the London-Edinburgh line became the world's fastest steam railway and how its proud and unique heritage is appreciated and celebrated today more than ever before. Superbly illustrated with over 300 colour and black & white photographs.
Transportation

Locomotive Portraits

Author: Jonathan Clay

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 160

View: 152

Railway art has existed as long as there have been Railways. Many famous names have included some aspect of railways in their paintings, notably Claude Monet and J M W Turner. This tradition has been kept alive by the formation in the UK of the Guild of Railway Artists, which now consists of over 200 artists, of which Jonathan Clay is one. Over the last few years, Jonathan has had many requests to produce his own book of pictures, and, having relented at last, this is the result.??In order to save time for his first ever railway event in 1999, he painted a series of locomotive pictures without backgrounds, intending to add the scenery later. However, they sold so well, that they became the norm, and the series of 'Locomotive Portraits' was born.