Automobile industry and trade

The Future of the British Car Industry

Author: Great Britain. Central Policy Review Staff

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Automobile industry and trade

Page: 141

View: 141

Transportation

The British Car Industry

Author: James Ruppert

Publisher: Action Automotive Limited

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 254

View: 393

Providing a history of the British car industry from 1945 to 2005, James Ruppert profiles one family who have bought British throughout this tumultuous period for the UK automotive sector.
Business & Economics

The British Motor Industry, 1945-94

Author: Timothy Whisler

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 440

View: 427

A fascinating and well-researched look at the British motor industry which will appeal to both academic readers and practitioners alike. Why are there now no major car manufacturers in Britain? Whisler considers this and the surrounding issues, making valuable comparisons with overseas manufacturers operating both in the UK and abroad, which provide us with additional interest and insight. Based upon careful use of company archives, this book covers in particular the issues of product development, quality, design, and range, ensuring that The British Motor Industry is destined to make a distinctive contribution to our understanding of the performance of UK manufacturers.
Automobile industry and trade

The Motor Men

Author: Peter King

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Automobile industry and trade

Page: 168

View: 804

Business & Economics

Brexit and the Car Industry

Author: Matthew Humphreys

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 148

View: 259

One of the principal arguments put forth by Brexit supporters is that by freeing the UK from the stranglehold of EU law, the country will be able to expand its markets through increased bilateral trade and enhance economic growth. This book tests this proposition by reference to the car industry. Brexit and the Car Industry explores the international position of the car market to argue that the hope of Brexit bringing regulatory freedom is illusory. The book starts by examining the structure of the vehicle industry, how its regulatory framework evolved and how the environment in which it operates is constrained by international standards and the practicalities associated with trading across different regulatory systems. By examining the evolution of vehicle regulations, particularly related to the environment, it argues that a UK independent path is not only impractical but self-defeating. The private car market is structured in such a way that is global, and meeting the various international regulatory requirements is a price of entry requirement which no bilateral trade agreements are likely to alter. The book also considers changing environment affecting the car industry in the context of an aspiration for regulatory freedom. The response to climate change and the impact of technological change – specifically driverless vehicles – are big questions for the industry and both are examined in this book. The book also considers the emergence of large metropolitan areas imposing their own use and environmental requirements operating separately to national standards. The future of electric and autonomous vehicles combined with the complexity of the regulatory environment with both international and localised pollution measures make the UK navigating a safe independent path through with a viable car industry highly questionable. Providing a comprehensive review of the relationship between regulatory frameworks and free trading models, this book is aimed at industry and legal professionals. It will also be of interest to students studying market behaviour, free trade law and the free movement of goods, and environmental protection.
Business & Economics

Japanese Inward Investment in UK Car Manufacturing

Author: Young-Chan Kim

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 324

View: 918

This title was first published in 2002. This compelling text provides fresh insight into an area that is often touched upon, but rarely examined in any great detail - the relationship between Multinational Enterprises (MNEs) and their host governments. Taking Japanese Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) strategy, arguably the model of FDI, Young-Chan Kim takes a revealing look at why the United Kingdom (UK) has dominated among the EU member states for FDI destination, while ironically losing its nationalized car manufacturers. Scholars of business history, international business and business economics will find this work invaluable.
Business & Economics

The European Automobile Industry

Author: William A. Maloney

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 272

View: 831

This book presents an analysis of some of the changes that have transformed the automobile industry in the last thirty years illustrating some of the most significant consequences of globalization. Focusing on the response of Europe's policy makers, it analyzes government-industry relations at both national and transnational levels, demonstrating how national policy instruments have been eroded by regional, political and economic integration. There has been a significant and irreversible shift in the locus of decision-making power from nation states to the regional level in the automobile sector.
Business & Economics

The British Economy in Transition

Author: Royce Logan Turner

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 260

View: 889

An examination of attempts at economic regeneration in areas that have experienced decline in 'traditional' industry. Coal, steel, defence, textiles, and the motor industry are discussed by an expert in the area.
Business & Economics

The Decline of the British Motor Industry (Routledge Revivals)

Author: Peter Dunnett

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 208

View: 342

First published in 1980, this book considers the British motor industry over the period between 1945 and 1979, analysing the ways in which the industry suffered a considerable decline in the post-war era, when compared to motor industries of other countries or to most other British industries. Rather than blaming labour and management, as has frequently been the case, the author argues that the decline can be traced back to poor government policy. Tracing how, when and where government policies affected the industry, the book examines policies clearly directed at the motor industry, such as transport legislation and motor taxation. In addition the work considers the consequences of many policies which were targeted only indirectly at the motor industry as the author argues that whilst government policy may have succeeded in its aim, e.g. improving employment for the balance of payments, the motor industry may have suffered as a consequence. Written in non-technical language, the reissue will be of interest to those concerned with post-war UK economic development, the UK motor industry in particular and the history of government policy in general.
Business & Economics

The Rise and Decline of the British Motor Industry

Author: Roy A. Church

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 144

View: 477

A concise 1995 review of the strengths and weaknesses of the British motor industry during the one hundred years since its foundation.
Business & Economics

The Dynamics of Advertising

Author: Jackie Botterill

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 300

View: 330

The authors suggest that advertisments, while important in our daily emotional self-management, are far more closely linked to the pragmatics of everyday life than their symbolic richness might suggest. Recent trends in advertisment content point to an important shift in our relationship to goods that reflects an increasing preoccupation with risk management.
Business & Economics

The British Motor Industry

Author: James Foreman-Peck

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 323

View: 193

"The story is taken back to the beginnings of the motor car . . . Labour relations and management policy are analysed in detail, as is the impact of government policy. Particular attention is paid to national demand conditions and to demand shocks as formataive influences"--Book jacket.
History

A History of Modern Britain

Author: Andrew Marr

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 640

View: 991

A History of Modern Britain by Andrew Marr confronts head-on the victory of shopping over politics. It tells the story of how the great political visions of New Jerusalem or a second Elizabethan Age, rival idealisms, came to be defeated by a culture of consumerism, celebrity and self-gratification. In each decade, political leaders think they know what they are doing, but find themselves confounded. Every time, the British people turn out to be stroppier and harder to herd than predicted. Throughout, Britain is a country on the edge – first of invasion, then of bankruptcy, then on the vulnerable front line of the Cold War and later in the forefront of the great opening up of capital and migration now reshaping the world. This history follows all the political and economic stories, but deals too with comedy, cars, the war against homosexuals, Sixties anarchists, oil-men and punks, Margaret Thatcher's wonderful good luck, political lies and the true heroes of British theatre. This edition also includes an extra chapter charting the course from Blair to Brexit.
Automobile industry and trade

The Automobile Industry

Author: Geoffrey De Holden-Stone

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Automobile industry and trade

Page: 223

View: 363

Business & Economics

The Structure of British Industry

Author: Peter Johnson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 413

View: 253

`...as an up-to-date and intelligible an account of large areas of British industry as you will find...It will be a valuable handbook for a variety of users: students and teachers(its prijmary audience), businessmen or coivil servants.' British Business