Religion

Intermediate Biblical Hebrew Grammar

Author: Eric D. Reymond

Publisher: SBL Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 354

View: 578

A unique grammar for intermediate or advanced students of Hebrew This grammar is intended for students of Hebrew who wish to learn more about the history of the Hebrew language, specifically its phonology and morphology. Reymond focuses on aspects of Hebrew that will encourage a student to better remember the words and their inflection as well as those that will reinforce general principles of the language. Specific examples for memorization are outlined at the end of each chapter. The book also serves as a resource for students wishing to remind themselves of the relative frequency of certain phenomena. The book provides students with a full picture of the language's morphology. Features: Tables of nouns and adjectives illustrating the absolute and construct, singular and plural forms, as well as all the forms with suffixes Tables include forms not found in the Masoretic Text Additional tables that set similar verbal inflections side by side
Language Arts & Disciplines

The Semitic Languages

Author: Stefan Weninger

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 1296

View: 505

The handbook The Semitic Languages offers a comprehensive reference tool for Semitic Linguistics in its broad sense. It is not restricted to comparative Grammar, although it covers also comparative aspects, including classification. By comprising a chapter on typology and sections with sociolinguistic focus and language contact, the conception of the book aims at a rather complete, unbiased description of the state of the art in Semitics. Articles on individual languages and dialects give basic facts as location, numbers of speakers, scripts, numbers of extant texts and their nature, attestation where appropriate, and salient features of the grammar and lexicon of the respective variety. The handbook is the most comprehensive treatment of the Semitic language family since many decades.
Religion

Qumran Hebrew

Author: Eric D. Reymond

Publisher: Society of Biblical Lit

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 328

View: 919

A unique study of the Hebrew of the Dead Sea Scrolls In Qumran Hebrew, Reymond examines the orthography, phonology, and morphology of the Dead Sea Scrolls. Short sections treat specific linguistic phenomena and present a synopsis and critique of previous research. Reymond’s approach emphasizes problems posed by scribal errors and argues that guttural letters had not all “weakened” but instead were “weak” in specific linguistic environments, texts, or dialects. Reymond illustrates that certain phonetic shifts (such as the shift of yodh > aleph and the opposite shift of aleph > yodh) occur in discernible linguistic contexts that suggest this was a real phonetic phenomenon. Features: Summary and critique of previous research Discussion of the most recently published scrolls Examination of scribal errors, guttural letters, and phonetic shifts
Language Arts & Disciplines

Semitic Noun Patterns

Author: Joshua Fox

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 382

View: 345

This is the first complete study of Semitic internal noun patterns since that of Jacob Barth, over a century ago. Drawing on the earlier work of Semitists and linguists, this work presents a comprehensive new synthesis.
History

Getrennte Wege?

Author: Robert Rollinger

Publisher: Verlag Antike

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 655

View: 743

Includes papers from two sections of the 45th Deutscher Historikertag held in Sept. 2004 in Kiel, Germany, and from an international colloquium held in June 2005 in Innsbruck, Austria.
Religion

How Old Is the Hebrew Bible?

Author: Ronald Hendel

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 240

View: 183

From two expert scholars comes a comprehensive study of the dating of the Hebrew Bible The age of the Hebrew Bible is a topic that has sparked controversy and debate in recent years. The scarcity of clear evidence allows for the possibility of many views, though these are often clouded by theological and political biases. This impressive, broad‑ranging book synthesizes recent linguistic, textual, and historical research to clarify the history of biblical literature, from its oldest texts and literary layers to its youngest. In clear, concise language, the authors provide a comprehensive overview that cuts across scholarly specialties to create a new standard for the historical study of the Bible. This much‑needed work paves the path forward to dating the Hebrew Bible and understanding crucial aspects of its historical and contemporary significance.
History

Semitic Words in Egyptian Texts of the New Kingdom and Third Intermediate Period

Author: James E. Hoch

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 596

View: 613

Semitic words and names appear in unprecedented numbers in texts of the New Kingdom, the period when the Egyptian empire extended into Syria-Palestine. In his book, James Hoch provides a comprehensive account of these words--their likely origins, their contexts, and their implications for the study of Egyptian and Semitic linguistics and Late-Bronze and Iron-Age culture in the eastern Mediterranean. Unlike previous word catalogs, this work consists of concise word studies and contains a wealth of linguistic, lexical, and cultural information. Hoch considers some five hundred Semitic words found in Egyptian texts from about 1500 to 650 b.c.e. Building on previous scholarship, he proposes new etymologies and translations and discusses phonological, morphological, and semantic factors that figure in the use of these words. The Egyptian evidence is essential to an understanding of the phonology of Northwest Semitic, and Hoch presents a major reconstruction of the phonemic systems. Of equal importance is his account of the particular semantic use of Semitic vocabulary, in contexts sometimes quite different from those of the Hebrew scriptures and Ugaritic myths and legends. With its new critical assessment of many hotly debated issues of Semitic and Egyptian philology, this book will be consulted for its lexical and linguistic conclusions and will serve as the basis for future work in both fields. Originally published in 1994. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.
History

Phonology and Morphology of Biblical Hebrew

Author: Joshua Blau

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 700

More than 80 years have passed since Bauer and Leander’s historical grammar of Biblical Hebrew was published, and many advances in comparative historical grammar have been made during the interim. Joshua Blau, who has for much of his life been associated with the Academy of the Hebrew Language in Jerusalem, has during the past half century studied, collected data, and written frequently on various aspects of the Hebrew language. Phonology and Morphology of Biblical Hebrew had its origins in an introduction to Biblical Hebrew first written some 40 years ago; it has now been translated from Modern Hebrew, thoroughly revised and updated, and it distills a lifetime of knowledge of the topic. The book begins with a 60-page introduction that locates Biblical Hebrew in the Semitic family of languages. It then discusses various approaches to categorization and classification, introduces and discusses various linguistic approaches and features that are necessary to the discussion, and provides a background to the way that linguists approach a language such as Biblical Hebrew—all of which will be useful to students who have taken first-year Hebrew as well those who have studied Biblical Hebrew extensively but have not been introduced to linguistic study of the topic. After a brief discussion of phonetics, the main portion of the book is devoted to phonology and to morphology. In the section on phonology, Blau provides complete coverage of the consonant and vowel systems of Biblical Hebrew and of the factors that have affected both systems. In the section on morphology, he discusses the parts of speech (pronouns, verbs, nouns, numerals) and includes brief comments on the prepositions and waw. The historical processes affecting each feature are explained as Blau progresses through the various sections. The book concludes with a complete set of paradigms and extensive indexes. Blau’s recognized preeminence as a Hebraist and Arabist as well as his understanding of language change have converged in the production of this volume to provide an invaluable tool for the comparative and historical study of Biblical Hebrew phonology and morphology.
Religion

Athtart

Author: Aren M. Wilson-Wright

Publisher: Mohr Siebeck

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 194

View: 119

In this book, Aren M. Wilson-Wright proposes a new model for studying gods in the Ancient Near East. He then illustrates the utility of this model by applying it to a detailed study of the goddess Athtart at three Late Bronze Age sites: Egypt, Emar, and Ugarit. -back of book
Language Arts & Disciplines

Proceedings of the Fourth International Hamito-Semitic Congress

Author: Herrmann Jungraithmayr

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 609

View: 126

The papers in this volume derive from the 4th International Hamito-Semitic Congress, held in Marburg in 1983. The papers deal with the (morpho)phonology or syntax of individual languages or language (sub)families, and many have a diachronic angle.
History

The Study of the Ancient Near East in the Twenty-first Century

Author: William Foxwell Albright Centennial Conference

Publisher: Eisenbrauns

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 422

View: 356

Sixteen essays from the Albright conference held at the Johns Hopkins University charting the course of ancient Near Eastern studies in the twenty-first century. This landmark volume is essential reading for both students and scholars.
History

Mishneh Todah

Author: Nili Sacher Fox

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 584

View: 103

Jeffrey H. Tigay, A. M. Ellis Professor of Hebrew and Semitic Languages and Literatures at the University of Pennsylvania, master teacher and scholar extraordinaire, conservative rabbi and lifelong student of Torah receives due ovation in this exceptional volume, a tribute to his indelible impression on Jewish scholarship and pedagogy. The volume is arranged according to Professor Tigay’s primary topics of interest: deuteronomic studies, ancient Israelite religion and its Near Eastern context, and ancient Israelite literary tradition. The reader will enjoy diverse studies such as “Gender Transformation and Transgression: Contextualizing the Prohibition of Cross-dressing in Deuteronomy 22:5,” “The Problem of Evil in the Book of Job,” and “Linen and the Linguistic Dating of P” and will value the erudition of scholars such as Moshe Greenberg, Emanuel Tov, Gary Rendsburg, William Hallo, and Baruch Levine. In the customary appreciations and throughout the volume, colleagues, students, and friends laud Professor Tigay’s intellectual tenacity, relational warmth, pedagogical prowess, and devotion to Torah. A former student aptly speaks for those who know him best: “A scholar’s immortality lies in his or her work. It rests too in his or her students and in the respect won from his or her colleagues. A Festschrift like this one for Jeff Tigay is merely a token of that legacy, the acknowledgment by his students and colleagues that the work is indeed worth celebrating.” This legacy will surely be a boon and delight to the reader.
Oriental Orthodox churches

Orientalia

Author:

Publisher: Gregorian Biblical BookShop

ISBN:

Category: Oriental Orthodox churches

Page:

View: 195

Language Arts & Disciplines

Genealogical Classification of Semitic

Author: Leonid Kogan

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 749

View: 195

This volume is the first of its kind to offer a detailed, monographic treatment of Semitic genealogical classification. The introduction describes the author's methodological framework and surveys the history of the subgrouping discussion in Semitic linguistics, and the first chapter provides a detailed description of the proto-Semitic basic vocabulary. Each of its seven main chapters deals with one of the key issues of the Semitic subgrouping debate: the East/West dichotomy, the Central Semitic hypothesis, the North West Semitic subgroup, the Canaanite affiliation of Ugaritic, the historical unity of Aramaic, and the diagnostic features of Ethiopian Semitic and of Modern South Arabian. The book aims at a balanced account of all evidence pertinent to the subgrouping discussion, but its main focus is on the diagnostic lexical features, heavily neglected in the majority of earlier studies dealing with this subject. The author tries to assess the subgrouping potential of the vocabulary using various methods of its diachronic stratification. The hundreds of etymological comparisons given throughout the book can be conveniently accessed through detailed lexical indices.
Religion

The Curse of Ham

Author: David M. Goldenberg

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 472

View: 756

How old is prejudice against black people? Were the racist attitudes that fueled the Atlantic slave trade firmly in place 700 years before the European discovery of sub-Saharan Africa? In this groundbreaking book, David Goldenberg seeks to discover how dark-skinned peoples, especially black Africans, were portrayed in the Bible and by those who interpreted the Bible--Jews, Christians, and Muslims. Unprecedented in rigor and breadth, his investigation covers a 1,500-year period, from ancient Israel (around 800 B.C.E.) to the eighth century C.E., after the birth of Islam. By tracing the development of anti-Black sentiment during this time, Goldenberg uncovers views about race, color, and slavery that took shape over the centuries--most centrally, the belief that the biblical Ham and his descendants, the black Africans, had been cursed by God with eternal slavery. Goldenberg begins by examining a host of references to black Africans in biblical and postbiblical Jewish literature. From there he moves the inquiry from Black as an ethnic group to black as color, and early Jewish attitudes toward dark skin color. He goes on to ask when the black African first became identified as slave in the Near East, and, in a powerful culmination, discusses the resounding influence of this identification on Jewish, Christian, and Islamic thinking, noting each tradition's exegetical treatment of pertinent biblical passages. Authoritative, fluidly written, and situated at a richly illuminating nexus of images, attitudes, and history, The Curse of Ham is sure to have a profound and lasting impact on the perennial debate over the roots of racism and slavery, and on the study of early Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.
Reference

Elenchus of Biblica

Author: Robert North

Publisher: Gregorian Biblical BookShop

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 1264

View: 180

Language Arts & Disciplines

The Oxford Handbook of Arabic Linguistics

Author: Jonathan Owens

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 624

View: 423

Arabic is one of the world's largest languages, spoken natively by nearly 300 million people. By strength of numbers alone Arabic is one of our most important languages, studied by scholars across many different academic fields and cultural settings. It is, however, a complex language rooted in its own tradition of scholarship, constituted of varieties each imbued with unique cultural values and characteristic linguistic properties. Understanding its linguistics holistically is therefore a challenge. The Oxford Handbook of Arabic Linguistics is a comprehensive, one-volume guide that deals with all major research domains which have been developed within Arabic linguistics. Chapters are written by leading experts in the field, who both present state-of-the-art overviews and develop their own critical perspectives. The Handbook begins with Arabic in its Semitic setting and ends with the modern dialects; it ranges across the traditional - the classical Arabic grammatical and lexicographical traditions--to the contemporary--Arabic sociolinguistics, Creole varieties and codeswitching, psycholinguistics, and Arabic as a second language - while situating Arabic within current phonetic, phonological, morphological, syntactic and lexicological theory. An essential reference work for anyone working within Arabic linguistics, the book brings together different approaches and scholarly traditions, and provides analysis of current trends and directions for future research.