Fiction

Century of the Soldier

Author: Paul Kearney

Publisher: Solaris

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 816

View: 507

THE TIME OF THE WOLF IS AT HAND... Struck down in his moment of victory, Hebrion’s young King Abeleyn lies in a coma, his city in ruins and his fiancee and former lover vying for the throne. Corfe Cear-Inaf, now a colonel, is given a ragtag command of ill-equipped savages and sent on a hopeless mission by a jealous King who expects him to fail. Richard Hawkwood and Lord Murad return bearing news of horror on a savage new continent, with something terrible lurking in the hold. The Church is tearing itself apart, even as the champions of truth fight to bring peace between Ramusian and Merduk; but in the far West, a terrible new threat is rearing its head... The Century of the Soldier collects the final three books in Paul Kearney’s explosive The Monarchies of God series, revised and expanded for this edition: The Iron Wars, The Second Empire and Ships From The West.
Fiction

The Return of the Soldier

Author: Rebecca West

Publisher: Broadview Press

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 240

View: 722

The Return of the Soldier tells the story of a shell-shocked soldier who returns home from the First World War believing that he is in love with a working-class woman from his past, rather than married to his aristocratic wife. His family and doctor must decide whether to allow him to remain safely in his delusion, or to bring him back to reality and return him to the front. A brief novel with a seemingly simple plot, it is a classic of modernist literature and provides a point of entry into discussions of some of the twentieth century's most enduring themes. Appendices include textual variants, patriotic and antiwar verse from World War I, war journalism by West, contemporary paintings and propaganda posters, and material on shell-shock.
History

Defending Rome: The Masters of the Soldiers

Author: Julian Reynolds

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 252

View: 679

For its last eighty years, the Western Roman Empire was ruled by emperors who were unable to provide the leadership demanded by the crisis the Empire faced throughout this period. Power was exercised instead by the commanders of the Western armies, the magisteri militum or Masters of the Soldiers, four of whom stood out – Stilicho, Constantius, Aetius and Ricimer. Challenged by barbarian invasions, constantly diminishing resources, and indifference and sometimes hostility from the imperial court, the Senate and the Roman people, these men prolonged the existence of the Empire in the West beyond what would otherwise have been its natural span. This book tells the story of the collapse of the Western Empire, as seen through the lives of these individuals, a collapse that ended more than political and military structures, that encompassed the end of an ancient pagan culture and the inception of the age of Christianity.
History

Baroque Personae

Author: Rosario Villari

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 357

View: 112

The Baroque, which stretched from the end of the sixteenth to the second half of the seventeenth century, is one of the most enigmatic eras in history. In this book, thirteen distinguished scholars develop a portrait of institutions, ideologies, intellectual themes, and social structures as they are reflected in Baroque personae, or characteristic social roles. Studying the statesman, soldier, financier, secretary, rebel, preacher, missionary, nun, witch, scientist, artist, and bourgeois, the essays depart dramatically from traditional accounts of this era. The statesman, for example, is seen here as the exact opposite of a benevolent man working for the common good; and the soldier is depicted as part of an institution that could be savage and destructive but that also, by the end of the Baroque age, helped shape a more rational relationship with the military and civil society. The contributors are Rosario Villari, Henry Kamen, Geoffrey Parker, Daniel Dessert, Salvatore S. Nigro, Manuel Morán, José Andrés-Gallego, Adriano Prosperi, Mario Rosa, Brian P. Levack, Paolo Rossi, Giovanni Careri, and James S. Amelang.
History

Soldiers of the sun

Author: Meirion Harries

Publisher: Random House Inc

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 569

View: 263

Provides a political and military history of the legendary army, appraising its strengths and weaknesses, its military successes and criminal excesses
History

Ghosts of the Confederacy

Author: Gaines M. Foster

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 637

After Lee and Grant met at Appomatox Court House in 1865 to sign the document ending the long and bloody Civil War, the South at last had to face defeat as the dream of a Confederate nation melted into the Lost Cause. Through an examination of memoirs, personal papers, and postwar Confederate rituals such as memorial day observances, monument unveilings, and veterans' reunions, Ghosts of the Confederacy probes into how white southerners adjusted to and interpreted their defeat and explores the cultural implications of a central event in American history. Foster argues that, contrary to southern folklore, southerners actually accepted their loss, rapidly embraced both reunion and a New South, and helped to foster sectional reconciliation and an emerging social order. He traces southerners' fascination with the Lost Cause--showing that it was rooted as much in social tensions resulting from rapid change as it was in the legacy of defeat--and demonstrates that the public celebration of the war helped to make the South a deferential and conservative society. Although the ghosts of the Confederacy still haunted the New South, Foster concludes that they did little to shape behavior in it--white southerners, in celebrating the war, ultimately trivialized its memory, reduced its cultural power, and failed to derive any special wisdom from defeat.
Social Science

Setback of the Century

Author: Fatih Abdulsalam

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 254

View: 454

Three months after the US war on Iraq in 2003, I decided to travel to my home town, Mosul in northern Iraq just to embrace my family members and close friends . While I was walking around Mosul streets seeking what has been left of my childhood, a US patrol stopped me to ask : "Where are you from? Why are you here?" Immediately, I burst out into laughter. The soldier turned to a sergeant next to him and wondered: "Is he mad?" Then, he angrily asked, "Why are you laughing?" That laughter soon turned into a philosophical question. "Imagine yourself in my place, what would you answer?. The soldier got more upset while the outrage was raging me. In the evening of the same day, I heard in the news, that a US patrol was hit in an explosion in the same street. The image of the 20-year-old soldier immediately flashed up in my mind to tell me: I wish I had an answer from that soldier to my question. This is how I came to write this book in an attempt to outline a wider scene of the backgrounds that led to wage that war on Iraq.
Social Science

Body Dialectics in the Age of Goethe

Author: Marianne Henn

Publisher: Rodopi

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 437

View: 605

In opposition to an essentialist conceptualization, the social construct of the human body in literature can be analyzed and described by means of effective methodologies that are based on Discourse Theory, Theory of Cultural Transmission and Ecology, System Theory, and Media Theory. In this perspective, the body is perceived as a complex arrangement of substantiation, substitution, and omission depending on demands, expectations, and prohibitions of the dominant discourse network. The term Body-Dialectics stands for the attempt to decipher – and for a moment freeze – the web of such discursive arrangements that constitute the fictitious notion of the body in the framework of a specific historic environment, here in the Age of Goethe.