Poetry

The Complete Poems and Translations

Author: Christopher Marlowe

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN:

Category: Poetry

Page: 320

View: 849

The essential lyric works of the great Elizabethan playwright--newly revised and updated Though best known for his plays--and for courting danger as a homosexual, a spy, and an outspoken atheist--Christopher Marlowe was also an accomplished and celebrated poet. This long-awaited updated and revised edition of his poems and translations contains his complete lyric works--from his translations of Ovidian elegies to his most famous poem, "The Passionate Shepherd to His Love," to the impressive epic mythological poem "Hero and Leander." For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.
English poetry

Christopher Marlowe

Author: Christopher Marlowe

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: English poetry

Page: 283

View: 905

Biography & Autobiography

Christopher Marlowe and Richard Baines

Author: Roy Kendall

Publisher: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 453

View: 804

"Kendall's method is not to give full-scale interpretations of individual plays and poems or to attempt a conventional Canterbury/Cambridge/London appraisal of Marlowe's life, but rather to take the reader along a rough chronological path that traces the life of Richard Baines, picking suitable spots to break off the narrative and analyze Marlowe's writings and actions and reinterpret known events connected with his life and with Baines's (especially where they overlap). By offering fresh primary evidence, Kendall is able to suggest new ways in which each influenced the life of the other - especially how Baines influenced and affected Marlowe."--BOOK JACKET.
Literary Criticism

The Irony of Identity

Author: Ian McAdam

Publisher: University of Delaware Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 283

View: 161

Engaging the theories of Heinz Kohut on the individual's struggle for "manliness" and personal wholeness, McAdam illustrates how two fundamental points of destabilization in Marlowe's life and work - his subversive treatment of Christian belief and his ambivalence toward his homosexuality - clarify the plays' interest in the struggle for self-authorization. The author posits a post-Freudian argument in favor of pre-Oedipal narcissistic pathology in Marlowe's plays, in contrast to Kuriyama's psychoanalytic study, Hammer or Anvil, which is Freudian in approach and concerned with Oedipal patterns.
Drama

The Cambridge Companion to Christopher Marlowe

Author: Patrick Cheney

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 312

View: 941

The Cambridge Companion to Christopher Marlowe provides a full introduction to one of the great pioneers of both the Elizabethan stage and modern English poetry. It recalls that Marlowe was an inventor of the English history play (Edward II) and of Ovidian narrative verse (Hero and Leander), as well as being author of such masterpieces of tragedy and lyric as Doctor Faustus and 'The Passionate Shepherd to His Love'. Sixteen leading scholars provide accessible and authoritative chapters on Marlowe's life, texts, style, politics, religion, and classicism. The volume also considers his literary and patronage relationships and his representations of sexuality and gender and of geography and identity; his presence in modern film and theatre; and finally his influence on subsequent writers. The Companion includes a chronology of Marlowe's life, a note on reference works, and a reading list for each chapter.
Literary Criticism

Christopher Marlowe

Author: Robert A. Logan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 554

View: 942

In uncovering the origin of the designation 'University Wits', Bob Logan examines the characteristics of the Wits and their influence on the course of Elizabethan drama. For the first time, Christopher Marlowe is placed in the context of the six University Wits, where his reputation stands out as the most prominent, and the impact of his university education on his works is clarified. The essays selected for reprinting assess the most significant scholarship written about Marlowe, including biographical studies, challenges to familiar assumptions about the poet/playwright and his works, compositions on groupings of his works, on individual works, and on subjects particular to Marlowe. Unique in its perspective and in the collection of essays, this book will interest all students and scholars of Renaissance poetry, drama, and specialized cultural contexts.
Literary Collections

Christopher Marlowe in Context

Author: Emily C. Bartels

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 382

View: 683

A contemporary of William Shakespeare and Ben Jonson, Christopher Marlowe was one of the most influential early modern dramatists, whose life and mysterious death have long been the subject of critical and popular speculation. This collection sets Marlowe's plays and poems in their historical context, exploring his world and his wider cultural influence. Chapters by leading international scholars discuss both his major and lesser-known works. Divided into three sections, 'Marlowe's works', 'Marlowe's world', and 'Marlowe's reception', the book ranges from Marlowe's relationship with his own audience through to adaptations of his plays for modern cinema. Other contexts for Marlowe include history and politics, religion and science. Discussions of Marlowe's critics and Marlowe's appeal today, in performance, literature and biography, show how and why his works continue to resonate; and a comprehensive further reading list provides helpful suggestions for those who want to find out more.
Social Science

Elizabethan Marlowe

Author: William Zunder

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 113

View: 953

Intended as a discussion suitable for students, this book considers all Marlowe's major works in their historical and discursive context: Tamburlaine, Parts I and II, The Jew of Malta, Edward II, Doctor Faustus, and Hero and Leander. Marlowe's writing emerges as embedded in the historical processes of his time and as crossed by the contradictory discourses of his day.
Literary Criticism

The Cambridge History of English Poetry

Author: Michael O'Neill

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 651

Poetry written in English is uniquely powerful and suggestive in its capacity to surprise, unsettle, shock, console, and move. The Cambridge History of English Poetry offers sparklingly fresh and dynamic readings of an extraordinary range of poets and poems from Beowulf to Alice Oswald. An international team of experts explores how poets in England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland use language and to what effect, examining questions of form, tone, and voice; they comment, too, on how formal choices are inflected by the poet's time and place. The Cambridge History of English Poetry is the most comprehensive and authoritative history of the field from early medieval times to the present. It traces patterns of continuity, transformation, transition, and development. Covering a remarkable array of poets and poems, and featuring an extensive bibliography, the scope and depth of this major work of reference make it required reading for anyone interested in poetry.
English drama

The Marlowe-Shakespeare Continuum

Author: Donna N. Murphy

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN:

Category: English drama

Page: 250

View: 490

For those who doubt that the actor from Stratford, William Shakspere, wrote the works of Shakespeare, the brilliant poet and playwright Christopher Marlowe has always been the professional candidate. In this book, which argues that a chronological approach is essential, Donna N. Murphy employs a variety of tools to document a Marlowe-Shakespeare continuum (with her proposed dates of first-version authorship) in The Taming of the Shrew, c. 1590; II and III Henry VI, c. 1590; Edward III c. 1590–1; Titus Andronicus c. 1591–3; Thomas of Woodstock c. 1593; Romeo and Juliet c. 1595–6; and I Henry IV, c. 1596–7. Her research firmly supports the theory that Christopher Marlowe, living on after he supposedly died, was the main hand behind the works of Shakespeare.
Literary Criticism

English Poetry of the Sixteenth Century

Author: Gary F. Waller

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 334

View: 900

Explores the poetry of the Renaissance, from Dunbar in the late 15th century to the Songs and Sonnets of John Donne in the early 17th. The book offers more than the wealth of literature discussed: it is a pioneering work in its own right, bringing the insights of contemporary literary and cultural theory to an overview of the period.
Literary Criticism

The Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare and Contemporary Dramatists

Author: Ton Hoenselaars

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 323

View: 219

While Shakespeare's popularity has continued to grow, so has the attention paid to the work of his contemporaries. The contributors to this Companion introduce the distinctive drama of these playwrights, from the court comedies of John Lyly to the works of Richard Brome in the Caroline era. With chapters on a wide range of familiar and lesser-known dramatists, including Thomas Kyd, Christopher Marlowe, Ben Jonson, John Webster, Thomas Middleton and John Ford, this book devotes particular attention to their personal and professional relationships, occupational rivalries and collaborations. Overturning the popular misconception that Shakespeare wrote in isolation, it offers a new perspective on the most impressive body of drama in the history of the English stage.
Literary Criticism

Wit's Treasury

Author: Stephen Orgel

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 216

View: 297

As England entered the Renaissance and as humanism, with its focus on classical literature and philosophy, informed the educational system, English intellectuals engaged in a concerted effort to remake the culture, language, manners—indeed, the whole national style—through adapting the classics. But how could English literature, art, and culture, become "classical," not only in imitating the ancients, but in the sense subsequently applied to music: "classical" as opposed to popular, as formal, serious, and therefore as good? For several decades in the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, Stephen Orgel writes, the return to the classics held out the promise of refinement and civility. Poetry was to be modeled on Greek and Roman examples rather than on the great English medieval works, which though admirable, lacked "correctness." More than poetry was at stake, however, and the transition would not be easy. Classical rules seemed the wave of the future, rescuing England from what was seen as the crudeness and the sheer popularity of its native traditions, but advocacy was tempered with a good deal of ambivalence: classical manners and morals were often at variance with Christian principles, and the classicism of the age would need to be deeply revisionist. "Christian humanism" was never untroubled, Orgel writes, always an unstable or even paradoxical amalgam. In Wit's Treasury, one of our foremost interpreters of Renaissance literature and culture charts how this ambivalence yielded the rich creative tension out of which emerged an unprecedented flowering of drama, lyric, and the arts. Orgel has here written a book that will appeal to anyone interested in English Renaissance art and literature, and particularly in the cultural ferment that produced Shakespeare, Marlowe, Spenser, Jonson, and Milton.
Literary Criticism

Early Augustan Virgil

Author: Virgil

Publisher: Bucknell University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 232

View: 425

Early Augustan Virgil prints for the first time in its entirety the substantial version of Virgil comprising most of Aeneid II-VI by the young royalist poet Sir John Denham in the 1630s. Denham's later published versions, The Destruction of Troy of 1656 and The Passion of Dido for Aeneas printed in his Poems and Translations of 1668, are also included for comparative purposes, alongside the couplet version of Aeneid IV by Sidney Godolphin and Edmund Waller published in 1659 with the title later used by Denham, The Passion of Dido for Aeneas. Critical introductions establish the interrelation of these versions and the pioneering status of the poets as practitioners of the Augustan style later perfected by Dryden and Pope. Early Augustan Virgil makes accessible a substantial text by a pioneer in couplet writing and in the theory and practice of translation, vindicating Pope's distinction when he enjoins his reader to "praise the easy vigor of a line,/ Where Denham's strength and Waller's sweetness join." The volume thus puts Denham's version of Virgil sympathetically into a context where it can be seen to make an important contribution to the development of the English Augustan style, thus making a case for the formative influence of classical translation upon the development of English poetry. It also makes a contribution to the reception of Virgil and will be of interest to readers of classical and English poetry alike.
Literary Criticism

Elizabethan Narrative Poems: The State of Play

Author: Lynn Enterline

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 272

View: 731

Tracing the development of narrative verse in London's literary circles during the 1590s, this volume puts Shakespeare's Venus and Adonis and The Rape of Lucrece into conversation with poems by a wide variety of contemporary writers, including Thomas Lodge, Francis Beaumont, Christopher Marlowe, Thomas Heywood, Thomas Campion and Edmund Spenser. Chapters investigate the complexities of this literary conversation and contribute for the current, vigorous reassessment of humanism's intended consequences by drawing attention to the highly diverse forms of early modern classicism as well as the complex connection between Latin pedagogy and vernacular poetic invention. Key themes and topics include: -Epyllia, masculinity and sexuality -Classicism and commerce -Genre and mimesis -Rhetoric and aesthetics