Computers

The Data Model Resource Book, Volume 1

Author: Len Silverston

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 560

View: 175

A quick and reliable way to build proven databases for core business functions Industry experts raved about The Data Model Resource Book when it was first published in March 1997 because it provided a simple, cost-effective way to design databases for core business functions. Len Silverston has now revised and updated the hugely successful 1st Edition, while adding a companion volume to take care of more specific requirements of different businesses. This updated volume provides a common set of data models for specific core functions shared by most businesses like human resources management, accounting, and project management. These models are standardized and are easily replicated by developers looking for ways to make corporate database development more efficient and cost effective. This guide is the perfect complement to The Data Model Resource CD-ROM, which is sold separately and provides the powerful design templates discussed in the book in a ready-to-use electronic format. A free demonstration CD-ROM is available with each copy of the print book to allow you to try before you buy the full CD-ROM.
Computers

The Data Model Resource Book

Author: Len Silverston

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 648

View: 663

This third volume of the best-selling "Data Model Resource Book" series revolutionizes the data modeling discipline by answering the question "How can you save significant time while improving the quality of any type of data modeling effort?" In contrast to the first two volumes, this new volume focuses on the fundamental, underlying patterns that affect over 50 percent of most data modeling efforts. These patterns can be used to considerably reduce modeling time and cost, to jump-start data modeling efforts, as standards and guidelines to increase data model consistency and quality, and as an objective source against which an enterprise can evaluate data models. Praise for The Data Model Resource Book, Volume 3 "Len and Paul look beneath the superficial issues of data modeling and have produced a work that is a must for every serious designer and manager of an IT project." —Bill Inmon, World-renowned expert, speaker, and author on data warehousing and widely recognized as the "father of data warehousing" "The Data Model Resource Book, Volume 3: Universal Patterns for Data Modeling is a great source for reusable patterns you can use to save a tremendous amount of time, effort, and cost on any data modeling effort. Len Silverston and Paul Agnewhave provided an indispensable reference of very high-quality patterns for the most foundational types of datamodel structures. This book represents a revolutionary leap in moving the data modeling profession forward." —Ron Powell, Cofounder and Editorial Director of the Business Intelligence Network "After we model a Customer, Product, or Order, there is still more about each of these that remains to be captured, such as roles they play, classifications in which they belong, or states in which they change. The Data Model Resource Book, Volume 3: Universal Patterns for Data Modeling clearly illustrates these common structures. Len Silverston and Paul Agnew have created a valuable addition to our field, allowing us to improve the consistency and quality of our models by leveraging the many common structures within this text." —Steve Hoberman, Best-Selling Author of Data Modeling Made Simple "The large national health insurance company I work at has actively used these data patterns and the (Universal Data Models) UDM, ahead of this book, through Len Silverston's UDM Jump Start engagement. The patterns have found their way into the core of our Enterprise Information Model, our data warehouse designs, and progressively into key business function databases. We are getting to reuse the patterns across projects and are reaping benefits in understanding, flexibility, and time-to-market. Thanks so much." —David Chasteen, Enterprise Information Architect "Reusing proven data modeling design patterns means exactly that. Data models become stable, but remain very flexible to accommodate changes. We have had the fortune of having Len and Paul share the patterns that are described in this book via our engagements with Universal Data Models, LLC. These data modeling design patterns have helped us to focus on the essential business issues because we have leveraged these reusable building blocks for many of the standard design problems. These design patterns have also helped us to evaluate the quality of data models for their intended purpose. Many times there are a lot of enhancements required. Too often the very specialized business-oriented data model is also implemented physically. This may have significant drawbacks to flexibility. I'm looking forward to increasing the data modeling design pattern competence within Nokia with the help of this book." —Teemu Mattelmaki, Chief Information Architect, Nokia "Once again, Len Silverston, this time together with Paul Agnew, has made a valuable contribution to the body of knowledge about datamodels, and the act of building sound data models. As a professional d
Data warehousing

THE DATA MODEL RESOURCE BOOK: UNIVERSAL PATTERNS FOR DATA MODELING

Author: Len Silverston

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Data warehousing

Page: 640

View: 311

Market_Desc: · Database administrators· Data Modelers and Analysts· Database Designers Special Features: · The author is a widely known and respected authority on data modeling; he will actively promote the book in writing and speaking engagements.· Wiley is the leading publisher of books on databases and data warehousing. About The Book: The Data Model Resource Book, Volume 3, presents a collection of common patterns that can be used to customize existing data models (including those in Volumes 1 and 2) as well as create new data models. Each chapter describes a universal data pattern which is applicable across a wide variety of organizations, and includes several examples of specific implementations. The authors also provide more general guidelines and best practices for implementing these patterns, and in particular how to customize existing models as well as convert models into physical database designs.
Computers

The Data Model Resource Book, Volume 1

Author: Len Silverston

Publisher: Wiley

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 560

View: 187

A quick and reliable way to build proven databases for core business functions Industry experts raved about The Data Model Resource Book when it was first published in March 1997 because it provided a simple, cost-effective way to design databases for core business functions. Len Silverston has now revised and updated the hugely successful 1st Edition, while adding a companion volume to take care of more specific requirements of different businesses. This updated volume provides a common set of data models for specific core functions shared by most businesses like human resources management, accounting, and project management. These models are standardized and are easily replicated by developers looking for ways to make corporate database development more efficient and cost effective. This guide is the perfect complement to The Data Model Resource CD-ROM, which is sold separately and provides the powerful design templates discussed in the book in a ready-to-use electronic format. A free demonstration CD-ROM is available with each copy of the print book to allow you to try before you buy the full CD-ROM.
Computers

Enterprise Model Patterns

Author: David C. Hay

Publisher: Technics Publications

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 532

View: 301

Here you’ll find one key to the development of a successful information system: Clearly capture and communicate both the abstract and concrete building blocks of data that describe your organization. In 1995, David Hay published Data Model Patterns: Conventions of Thought - the groundbreaking book on how to use standard data models to describe the standard business situations. Enterprise Model Patterns: Describing the World builds on the concepts presented there, adds 15 years of practical experience, and presents a more comprehensive view. You will learn how to apply both the abstract and concrete elements of your enterprise’s architectural data model through four levels of abstraction: Level 0: An abstract template that underlies the Level 1 model that follows, plus two meta models: • Information Resources. In addition to books, articles, and e-mail notes, it also includes photographs, videos, and sound recordings. • Accounting. Accounting is remarkable because it is itself a modeling language. It takes a very different approach than data modelers in that instead of using entities and entity classes that represent things in the world, it is concerned with accounts that represent bits of value to the organization. Level 1: An enterprise model that is generic enough to apply to any company or government agency, but concrete enough to be readily understood by all. It describes: • People and Organization. Who is involved with the business? The people involved are not only the employees within the organization, but customers, agents, and others with whom the organization comes in contact. Organizations of interest include the enterprise itself and its own internal departments, as well as customers, competitors, government agencies, and the like. • Geographic Locations. Where is business conducted? A geographic location may be either a geographic area (defined as any bounded area on the Earth), a geographic point (used to identify a particular location), or, if you are an oil company for example, a geographic solid (such as an oil reserve). • Assets. What tangible items are used to carry out the business? These are any physical things that are manipulated, sometimes as products, but also as the means to producing products and services. • Activities. How is the business carried out? This model not only covers services offered, but also projects and any other kinds of activities. In addition, the model describes the events that cause activities to happen. • Time. All data is positioned in time, but some more than others. Level 2: A more detailed model describing specific functional areas: • Facilities • Human Resources • Communications and Marketing • Contracts • Manufacturing • The Laboratory Level 3: Examples of the details a model can have to address what is truly unique in a particular industry. Here you see how to address the unique bits in areas as diverse as: • Criminal Justice. The model presented here is based on the “Global Justice XML Data Model” (GJXDM). • Microbiology • Banking. The model presented here is the result of working for four different banks and then adding some thought to come up with something different from what is currently in any of them. • Highways. The model here is derived from a project in a Canadian Provincial Highway Department, and addresses the question “what is a road?”
Business & Economics

Advanced Topics in Information Resources Management, Volume 1

Author: Khosrow-Pour, D.B.A., Mehdi

Publisher: IGI Global

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 399

View: 734

Advanced Topics in Information Resources Management features the latest research findings dealing with all aspects of information resources management, managerial and organizational applications, as well as implications of information technology organizations. It aims to be instrumental in the improvement and development of the theory and practice of information resources management, appealing to both practicing managers and academics.