History

The Erosion of Childhood

Author: Lionel Rose

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 536

First published in 2002. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Education

Too Much, Too Soon?

Author: Richard House

Publisher: Hawthorn Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 355

View: 549

How to nurture young children's well-being and learning to reverse the erosion of childhood? Children's lives have been speeded up by commercialisation, 'adultification', and the government's 'nappy curriculum' which 'schoolifies' them and pushes quasi-formal learning too soon. Now, in twenty-three hard-hitting chapters, leading educators, researchers, policy makers and parents advocate alternative ways ahead for slowing childhood, better policy-making and, above all, the 'right learning at the right time' in children's growth ? learning when they are developmentally ready.
History

The Erosion of Childhood

Author: Lionel Rose

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 511

First published in 2002. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Children

The Erosion of Childhood

Author: Valerie Polakow Suransky

Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Children

Page: 221

View: 807

Child care

The Erosion of Childhood

Author: Valerie Polakow Suransky

Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Child care

Page: 221

View: 451

How can child care be structured to protect both the interests of children and the rights of women? Must children suffer the "loss" of their childhood through institutional care? Polakow uses her observations of pre-school centers-including profit-run, federally funded, community, and Montessori institutions-to open the "windows of daycare."
Education

Invisibly Blighted

Author: Sandra Leaton Gray

Publisher: Ucl Ioe Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 126

View: 894

Children carry the weight of other people's expectations on their shoulders, and in the technological age that represents a bigger burden than it ever has before. This book is a manifesto for a different digital future for children in which their rights are respected and their identities are free. The authors explore new ways of understanding children's risk, schooling, biometrics, privacy issues, and technology innovation. Aimed at anyone who has sensed the cultural shift in childhood currently taking place, this book helps readers think more deeply about what it means to be a child in the digital world today.
Education

The Politics of Early Childhood Education

Author: Lourdes Diaz Soto

Publisher: Peter Lang

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 226

View: 647

As the conservative political mood of our nation eliminates programs for the increasing numbers of bilingual children, educators are nevertheless expected to teach linguistically and culturally diverse learners with limited background knowledge and resources. This edited volume challenges "mainstream" educators to critically examine how to best meet the needs of bilingual/bicultural children in contemporary America.
History

Children and Childhood in Western Society Since 1500

Author: Hugh Cunningham

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 204

View: 878

Updated to incorporate recent scholarship on the subject, this new edition of Hugh Cunningham’s classic text investigates the relationship between ideas about childhood and the actual experience of being a child, and assesses how it has changed over the span of 500 years. Through his engaging narrative Hugh Cunningham tells the story of the development of ideas from the Renaissance to the present, revealing considerable differences in the way Western societies have understood and valued childhood over time. His survey of parent/child relationships uncovers evidence of parental love, care and, in the frequent cases of child death, grief throughout the period, concluding that there was as much continuity as change in the actual relations of children and adults across these five centuries. Since the book’s first publication in 1995, the volume of historical research on children and childhood has escalated hugely and is testimony to the level of concern provoked by the dominance of the negative narrative that originated in the 1970s and 1980s. A new epilogue revisits the volume from today’s perspective, analysing why this negative narrative established dominance in Western society and considering how it has affected historical writing about children and childhood, enabling the reader to put both this volume and recent debates into context. Supported by an updated historiographical discussion and expanded bibliography, Children and Childhood in Western Society since 1500 remains an essential resource for students of the history of childhood, the history of the family, social history and gender history.
History

Childhood and Child Labour in Industrial England

Author: Katrina Honeyman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 370

View: 318

The purpose of this collection is to bring together representative examples of the most recent work that is taking an understanding of children and childhood in new directions. The two key overarching themes are diversity: social, economic, geographical, and cultural; and agency: the need to see children in industrial England as participants - even protagonists - in the process of historical change, not simply as passive recipients or victims. Contributors address such crucial subjects as the varied experience of work; poverty and apprenticeship; institutional care; the political voice of children; child sexual abuse; and children and education. This volume, therefore, includes some of the best, innovative work on the history of children and childhood currently being written by both younger and established scholars.
Computers

Set Free Childhood

Author: Martin Large

Publisher: Hawthorn Press Ltd

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 229

View: 389

Children watch TV and use computers for five hours daily on average. But electronic media demands conflict with the needs of children. The result? Record levels of learning difficulties, obesity, eating disorders, sleep problems, language delay, aggressive behaviour, anxiety - and children on fast forward. Set Free Childhood shows how to counter screen culture and create a calmer, more enjoyable family life.
Education

Scholarly Resources for Children and Childhood Studies

Author: Vibiana Bowman

Publisher: Scarecrow Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 298

View: 460

Drawing together contributions from some of the leading scholars in the interdisciplinary field of children and childhood studies (CCS), this guided approach to literature searching in CCS provides background information about interdisciplinary study in general, and CCS in particular, as well as an outline of basic research practices.
Social Science

Depicting Canada’s Children

Author: Loren Lerner

Publisher: Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 468

View: 545

Depicting Canada’s Children is a critical analysis of the visual representation of Canadian children from the seventeenth century to the present. Recognizing the importance of methodological diversity, these essays discuss understandings of children and childhood derived from depictions across a wide range of media and contexts. But rather than simply examine images in formal settings, the authors take into account the components of the images and the role of image-making in everyday life. The contributors provide a close study of the evolution of the figure of the child and shed light on the defining role children have played in the history of Canada and our assumptions about them. Rather than offer comprehensive historical coverage, this collection is a catalyst for further study through case studies that endorse innovative scholarship. This book will be of interest to scholars in art history, Canadian history, visual culture, Canadian studies, and the history of children.
Sports & Recreation

The Erosion of the American Sporting Ethos

Author: Joel Nathan Rosen

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 294

View: 282

"This volume provides an analysis of the nature of competition in contemporary American sport. This work traces American sport from American culture to the influence of the 1960s counterculture and the resulting rise of a post-Cold War ethos that continues to reinterpret competitiveness as a relic of a misbegotten past and anathema to American life"--Provided by publisher.
Performing Arts

Child Labor in the British Victorian Entertainment Industry

Author: Dyan Colclough

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 227

View: 252

Child labor greatly contributed to the cultural and economic success of the British Victorian theatrical industry. This book highlights the complexities of the battle for child labor laws, the arguments for the needs of the theatre industry, and the weight of opposition that confronted any attempt to control employers.
Social Science

Governing Child Sexual Abuse

Author: Samantha Ashenden

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 244

View: 897

Ashenden brings a number of contemporary debates in social and political theory to bear upon the governance of child sexual abuse. In particular, drawing on the work of Foucault and Habermas.
Literary Criticism

Conceptualizing Cruelty to Children in Nineteenth-Century England

Author: Monica Flegel

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 214

View: 325

Moving nimbly between literary and historical texts, Monica Flegel provides a much-needed interpretive framework for understanding the specific formulation of child cruelty popularized by the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC) in the late nineteenth century. Flegel considers a wide range of well-known and more obscure texts from the mid-eighteenth century to the early twentieth, including philosophical writings by Locke and Rousseau, poetry by Coleridge, Blake, and Caroline Norton, works by journalists and reformers like Henry Mayhew and Mary Carpenter, and novels by Frances Trollope, Charles Dickens, Wilkie Collins, and Arthur Morrison. Taking up crucial topics such as the linking of children with animals, the figure of the child performer, the relationship between commerce and child endangerment, and the problem of juvenile delinquency, Flegel examines the emergence of child abuse as a subject of legal and social concern in England, and its connection to earlier, primarily literary representations of endangered children. With the emergence of the NSPCC and the new crime of cruelty to children, new professions and genres, such as child protection and social casework, supplanted literary works as the authoritative voices in the definition of social ills and their cure. Flegel argues that this development had material effects on the lives of children, as well as profound implications for the role of class in representations of suffering and abused children. Combining nuanced close readings of individual texts with persuasive interpretations of their influences and limitations, Flegel's book makes a significant contribution to the history of childhood, social welfare, the family, and Victorian philanthropy.