Religion

The Evangelical Voter

Author: Stuart Rothenberg

Publisher: University Press of Amer

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 176

View: 721

This study of evangelicals and fundamentalists is based on a nationwide survey conducted by Lance Tarrance and Associates in 1983. It examines the relationship between religious beliefs and behavior and political consciousness. It also examines evangelical and fundamentalist attitudes on a wide variety of policy questions and their political mobilization and behavior.
Political Science

Unholy

Author: Sarah Posner

Publisher: Random House

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 400

View: 906

“In terrifying detail, Unholy illustrates how a vast network of white Christian nationalists plotted the authoritarian takeover of the American democratic system. There is no more timely book than this one.”—Janet Reitman, author of Inside Scientology Why did so many evangelicals turn out to vote for Donald Trump, a serial philanderer with questionable conservative credentials who seems to defy Christian values with his every utterance? To a reporter like Sarah Posner, who has been covering the religious right for decades, the answer turns out to be far more intuitive than one might think. In this taut inquiry, Posner digs deep into the radical history of the religious right to reveal how issues of race and xenophobia have always been at the movement’s core, and how religion often cloaked anxieties about perceived threats to a white, Christian America. Fueled by an antidemocratic impulse, and united by this narrative of reverse victimization, the religious right and the alt-right support a common agenda–and are actively using the erosion of democratic norms to roll back civil rights advances, stock the judiciary with hard-right judges, defang and deregulate federal agencies, and undermine the credibility of the free press. Increasingly, this formidable bloc is also forging ties with European far right groups, giving momentum to a truly global movement. Revelatory and engrossing, Unholy offers a deeper understanding of the ideological underpinnings and forces influencing the course of Republican politics. This is a book that must be read by anyone who cares about the future of American democracy.

Values Voters in America

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 726

The South was once a bastion of support for the Democratic Party. Through the New Deal and the Civil Rights movements that support was dramatically eroded. Today, the Dixiecrats have been replaced by a new breed of conservative Republicans who are able to capitalize on the Souths Evangelical voters. My thesis will examine how Evangelicals in the South make their voter decisions. This will include the various opinions leaders they consult as well as various media channels. My data was collected by surveying Southern Evangelicals in four different congressional districts in Southern Virginia and North Carolina. My findings are contextualized where possible with national survey data. The findings reported in this thesis have offered substantial support to my hypotheses. First, I asserted that pastors, national religious figures and religious media sources would be the most predominant amongst Southern Evangelicals. The influence of pastors, national religious figures, and, I would add, fellow Christians generally, were found to be the most influential. The only group that it could be said is more influential were the candidates themselves. Religious media and interest groups did assert themselves as frequently consulted. Southern Evangelicals are clearly utilizing a wide range of media channels. Furthermore, I found that the frequent consultation of secular media has had a diversifying influence on vote choice. What is most interesting, though, is that the ideological influence of religious media and the conservative FOX News does diminish the likelihood of users to have voted for another partys candidates for political office federally. The second component of my hypothesis asserted that the strength of pastors, religious media and figures would cause Southern Evangelicals to remain strongly Republican in the near future at least. This hypothesis is entirely supported. Values Voters are not simply partisan robots, however. My study has shown that it is the personal views of Evangelicals that dictate their vote choice, which are then in turn confirmed by national religious figures.
Political Science

Immigrants, Evangelicals, and Politics in an Era of Demographic Change

Author: Janelle S. Wong

Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 154

View: 552

As immigration from Asia and Latin America reshapes the demographic composition of the U.S., some analysts have anticipated the decline of conservative white evangelicals’ influence in politics. Yet, Donald Trump captured a larger share of the white evangelical vote in the 2016 election than any candidate in the previous four presidential elections. Why has the political clout of white evangelicals persisted at a time of increased racial and ethnic diversity? In Immigrants, Evangelicals, and Politics in an Era of Demographic Change, political scientist Janelle Wong examines a new generation of Asian American and Latino evangelicals and offers an account of why demographic change has not contributed to a political realignment. Asian Americans and Latinos currently constitute 13 percent of evangelicals, and their churches are among the largest, fastest growing organizations in their communities. While evangelical identity is associated with conservative politics, Wong draws from national surveys and interviews to show that non-white evangelicals express political attitudes that are significantly less conservative than those of their white counterparts. Black, Asian American, and Latino evangelicals are much more likely to support policies such as expanded immigration rights, increased taxation of the wealthy, and government interventions to slow climate change. As Wong argues, non-white evangelicals’ experiences as members of racial or ethnic minority groups often lead them to adopt more progressive political views compared to their white counterparts. However, despite their growth in numbers, non-white evangelicals—particularly Asian Americans and Latinos—are concentrated outside of swing states, have lower levels of political participation than white evangelicals, and are less likely to be targeted by political campaigns. As a result, white evangelicals dominate the evangelical policy agenda and are overrepresented at the polls. Also, many white evangelicals have adopted even more conservative political views in response to rapid demographic change, perceiving, for example, that discrimination against Christians now rivals discrimination against racial and ethnic minorities. Wong demonstrates that immigrant evangelicals are neither “natural” Republicans nor “natural” Democrats. By examining the changing demographics of the evangelical movement, Immigrants, Evangelicals, and Politics in an Era of Demographic Change sheds light on an understudied constituency that has yet to find its political home.
Religion

The End of Empathy

Author: John W. Compton

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 416

View: 352

When polling data showed that an overwhelming 81% of white evangelicals had voted for Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election, commentators across the political spectrum were left aghast. Even for a community that had been tracking further and further right for decades, this support seemed decidedly out of step. How, after all, could an amoral, twice-divorced businessman from New York garner such devoted admiration from the most vociferous of "values voters?" That this same group had, not a century earlier, rallied national support for such progressive causes as a federal minimum wage, child labor laws, and civil rights made the Trump shift even harder to square. In The End of Empathy, John W. Compton presents a nuanced portrait of the changing values of evangelical voters over the course of the last century. To explain the rise of white Protestant social concern in the latter part of the nineteenth century and its sudden demise at the end of the twentieth, Compton argues that religious conviction, by itself, is rarely sufficient to motivate empathetic political behavior. When believers do act empathetically--championing reforms that transfer resources or political influence to less privileged groups within society, for example--it is typically because strong religious institutions have compelled them to do so. Citizens throughout the previous century had sought membership in churches as a means of ensuring upward mobility, but a deterioration of mainline Protestant authority that started in the 1960s led large groups of white suburbanites to shift away from the mainline Protestant churches. There to pick up the slack were larger evangelical congregations with conservative leaders who discouraged attempts by the government to promote a more equitable distribution of wealth and political authority. That shift, Compton argues, explains the larger revolution in white Protestantism that brought us to this political moment.
Political Science

For God and Country

Author: Ralph Reed

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 256

View: 690

Donald Trump—Defender of Religious Freedom In 2016, many Christian leaders opposed candidate Donald Trump. He was a social liberal, and his vulgarity, divorces, affairs, and scandals made it impossible for him to defend Christian values in public life. Or so they thought. Trump nevertheless won an overwhelming majority of the Evangelical vote in 2016, as well as the Catholic vote. And in 2020, the idea that he can’t represent Christians is demonstrably false. He has been the most ardent and effective presidential defender of religious liberty and the pro-life cause since Ronald Reagan—whom he has even surpassed in many ways. In For God and Country, Dr. Ralph Reed draws on his deep knowledge of American history, his unsurpassed experience as a political strategist, his personal dealings with President Trump and the First Family, and his moral commitment as a Christian to show why Catholics and Evangelicals should continue to support their unlikely champion. In For God and Country, Reed reveals: The sincerity of President Trump’s Christian faith—and why he has delivered policy victories when other pro-Christian presidents haven’t Why Trump is the most pro-Israel president in American history How liberals hope to demoralize Christians—and thus defeat Donald Trump and reverse his pro-life, pro-family, pro–religious freedom policies Why Never-Trump Christians naively preach de facto political surrender For God and Country is not just required reading for the 2020 election; it is required reading for every conservative Christian who loves America and wants to return it to Christian values.
Religion

Obamagelicals

Author: Matthews Ronald Eric Gilbert Michele a

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 145

View: 497

Obamagelicals: How the Right Turned Left demonstrates how rhetorical strategies normalized, marginalized, and/or anaesthetized the traditional views of the white Protestant evangelical voter and gave younger white Protestant evangelicals, whose self-identify as being centrists or modernists, a voice that had otherwise been drowned out by the traditional old guard of the Protestant evangelical religious right. Obamagelicals argues President Obama capitalized on this completely different set of value issues that resonated with white Protestant evangelical centrists and modernists in ways never dreamed possible. Obamagelicals is a unique contribution to the current, interdisciplinary conversation about the role of white Protestant evangelicals in the democratic process and the victorious presidential election. It is unique because it treats Protestant evangelicalism not as a monolith but as a mosaic—comprised of numerous denominations and belief patterns. Through this creation of space on the theological continuum of Protestant evangelicalism, believers draw attention to themselves by creating distinction and attention. This book examines how the shift in theological interpretations of the Scriptures lead to shift in cultural and political issues that went undetected by Republican candidate Senator John McCain but embraced by President Obama. Obamagelicals provides a consistent methodological approach that is easy to understand for those interested in religion and politics. Using data analysis and cross-tabulations, each topic or theme employs simple, easy to understand variables thereby allowing for a cross-comparison. Obamagelicals allows us the opportunity to begin to examine the connections between religiosity and political participation on such key policy issues as the economy, war in Iraq and Afghanistan, and same-sex marriages, within the mosaic of Protestant evangelicalism in the shadow of the 2008 election.
Political Science

Summary: The Party Faithful

Author: BusinessNews Publishing

Publisher: Primento

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 44

View: 810

The must-read summary of Amy Sullivan's book: “The Party Faithful: How and Why Democrats Are Closing the God Gap”. This complete summary of "The Party Faithful" by Amy Sullivan, a Time magazine editor and specialist in religion and politics, presents her examination of the changing relationship between faith and politics in America. She traces how the Democrats lost favour with religious voters through their framing of moral and ethical issues such as abortion, and how they are gradually gaining popularity again by finding common ground with evangelical communities. Added-value of this summary: • Save time • Understand how the Democratic party lost and found favour with religious voters • Expand your knowledge of American politics and culture To learn more, read "The Party Faithful" and discover the changing relationship between religion and politics in the US, and how the parties are faring in these circumstances.
Business & Economics

Polling Matters

Author: Frank Newport

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 320

View: 415

From The Gallup Organization-the most respected source on the subject-comes a fascinating look at the importance of measuring public opinion in modern society. For years, public-opinion polls have been a valuable tool for gauging the positions of American citizens on a wide variety of topics. Polling applies scientific principles to understanding and anticipating the insights, emotions, and attitudes of society. Now in POLLING MATTERS: Why Leaders Must Listen to the Wisdom of the People, The Gallup Organization reveals: What polls really are and how they are conducted Why the information polls provide is so vitally important to modern society today How this valuable information can be used more effectively and more...

Evangelical Identity, Participation and Vote Choice

Author: Lindsey Rebekah Scruggs

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 252

View: 106

Abstract: This dissertation uses data from the American National Election Survey (ANES) to investigate if the Christian Right's presence amongst the American electorate has expanded in size and influence in the national elections from 1968 to 2004. The primary findings of the research are that while the Christian Right has an influential political presence (especially within the Republican party), its voting patterns and its ability to affect national electoral outcomes has remained largely constant over the 1968-2004 period. Building on the efforts of numerous scholars (e.g., Koopman 2001, Layman and Carmines 1997, Manza and Brooks 1997 and Regnerus, Sikkink and Smith 1999, Himmelstein and McRae, Jr. 1984, Bednar and Hertzke 1995, Green and Guth 1988 and Green, Guth and Wilcox 1998), my contribution will be to examine the Christian Right's political influence. Since much attention has been given to the Christian Right as a voting bloc, I will examine the Evangelical Protestants' presence among the electorate and the Republican Party. Next, I will explore the Christian Right as issue voters. These voters were first mobilized because of social issues.
Religion

Catholics and US Politics After the 2016 Elections

Author: Marie Gayte

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 226

View: 206

This book examines both the evolution of the Catholic vote in the US and the role of Catholic voters in the historic 2016 elections. There is a paucity of academic works on Catholics and US politics—scholars of religion and US politics tend to focus on evangelical Protestant voters—even though Catholics are widely considered the swing vote in national elections. The 2016 presidential election proves that the swing vote component of that group matters in close elections. What Trump gained from his impressive showing among Catholics, he could certainly lose in 2020 (should he seek re-election), just as Hillary Clinton lost the clear advantage among Catholics achieved by Barack Obama in 2008 and 2012. The book begins by analyzing the ideological patterns in the politics of U.S. Catholics as well as key alliances, and concludes by studying the political influences of the U.S. Catholic Bishops and the Holy See.
History

Jesus and John Wayne: How White Evangelicals Corrupted a Faith and Fractured a Nation

Author: Kristin Kobes Du Mez

Publisher: Liveright Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 463

A scholar of American Christianity presents a seventy-five-year history of evangelicalism that identifies the forces that have turned Donald Trump into a hero of the Religious Right. How did a libertine who lacks even the most basic knowledge of the Christian faith win 81 percent of the white evangelical vote in 2016? And why have white evangelicals become a presidential reprobate’s staunchest supporters? These are among the questions acclaimed historian Kristin Kobes Du Mez asks in Jesus and John Wayne, which delves beyond facile headlines to explain how white evangelicals have brought us to our fractured political moment. Challenging the commonly held assumption that the “moral majority” backed Donald Trump for purely pragmatic reasons, Du Mez reveals that Donald Trump in fact represents the fulfillment, rather than the betrayal, of white evangelicals’ most deeply held values. Jesus and John Wayne is a sweeping account of the last seventy-five years of white evangelicalism, showing how American evangelicals have worked for decades to replace the Jesus of the Gospels with an idol of rugged masculinity and Christian nationalism, or in the words of one modern chaplain, with “a spiritual badass.” As Du Mez explains, the key to understanding this transformation is to recognize the role of culture in modern American evangelicalism. Many of today’s evangelicals may not be theologically astute, but they know their VeggieTales, they’ve read John Eldredge’s Wild at Heart, and they learned about purity before they learned about sex—and they have a silver ring to prove it. Evangelical books, films, music, clothing, and merchandise shape the beliefs of millions. And evangelical popular culture is teeming with muscular heroes—mythical warriors and rugged soldiers, men like Oliver North, Ronald Reagan, Mel Gibson, and the Duck Dynasty clan, who assert white masculine power in defense of “Christian America.” Chief among these evangelical legends is John Wayne, an icon of a lost time when men were uncowed by political correctness, unafraid to tell it like it was, and did what needed to be done. Trump, in other words, is hardly the first flashy celebrity to capture evangelicals’ hearts and minds, nor is he the first strongman to promise evangelicals protection and power. Indeed, the values and viewpoints at the heart of white evangelicalism today—patriarchy, authoritarian rule, aggressive foreign policy, fear of Islam, ambivalence toward #MeToo, and opposition to Black Lives Matter and the LGBTQ community—are likely to persist long after Trump leaves office. A much-needed reexamination, Jesus and John Wayne explains why evangelicals have rallied behind the least-Christian president in American history and how they have transformed their faith in the process, with enduring consequences for all of us.
Religion

Evangelical Christianity and Democracy in Latin America

Author: Paul Freston

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 280

View: 931

In Latin America, evangelical Protestantism poses an increasing challenge to Catholicism's long-established religious hegemony. At the same time, the region is among the most generally democratic outside the West, despite often being labeled as 'underdeveloped.' Scholars disagree whether Latin American Protestantism, as a fast-growing and predominantly lower-class phenomenon, will encourage a political culture that is repressive and authoritarian, or if it will have democratizing effects. Drawing from a range of sources, Evangelical Christianity and Democracy in Latin America provides case studies of five countries: Brazil, Peru, Mexico, Guatemala, and Nicaragua. The contributors, mainly scholars based in Latin America, bring first hand-knowledge to their chapters. The result is a groundbreaking work that explores the relationship between Latin American evangelicalism and politics, its influences, manifestations, and prospects for the future. Evangelical Christianity and Democracy in Latin America is one of four volumes in the series Evangelical Christianity and Democracy in the Global South, which seeks to answer the question: What happens when a revivalist religion based on scriptural orthodoxy participates in the volatile politics of the Third World? At a time when the global-political impact of another revivalist and scriptural religion - Islam - fuels vexed debate among analysts the world over, these volumes offer an unusual comparative perspective on a critical issue: the often combustible interaction of resurgent religion and the developing world's unstable politics.
History

Moral Minority

Author: David R. Swartz

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 562

In 1973, nearly a decade before the height of the Moral Majority, a group of progressive activists assembled in a Chicago YMCA to strategize about how to move the nation in a more evangelical direction through political action. When they emerged, the Washington Post predicted that the new evangelical left could "shake both political and religious life in America." The following decades proved the Post both right and wrong—evangelical participation in the political sphere was intensifying, but in the end it was the religious right, not the left, that built a viable movement and mobilized electorally. How did the evangelical right gain a moral monopoly and why were evangelical progressives, who had shown such promise, left behind? In Moral Minority, the first comprehensive history of the evangelical left, David R. Swartz sets out to answer these questions, charting the rise, decline, and political legacy of this forgotten movement. Though vibrant in the late nineteenth century, progressive evangelicals were in eclipse following religious controversies of the early twentieth century, only to reemerge in the 1960s and 1970s. They stood for antiwar, civil rights, and anticonsumer principles, even as they stressed doctrinal and sexual fidelity. Politically progressive and theologically conservative, the evangelical left was also remarkably diverse, encompassing groups such as Sojourners, InterVarsity Christian Fellowship, Evangelicals for Social Action, and the Association for Public Justice. Swartz chronicles the efforts of evangelical progressives who expanded the concept of morality from the personal to the social and showed the way—organizationally and through political activism—to what would become the much larger and more influential evangelical right. By the 1980s, although they had witnessed the election of Jimmy Carter, the nation's first born-again president, progressive evangelicals found themselves in the political wilderness, riven by identity politics and alienated by a skeptical Democratic Party and a hostile religious right. In the twenty-first century, evangelicals of nearly all political and denominational persuasions view social engagement as a fundamental responsibility of the faithful. This most dramatic of transformations is an important legacy of the evangelical left.
Religion

The Jesus Machine

Author: Dan Gilgoff

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 336

View: 353

*The crucial Ohio get-out-the-vote effort that lifted Bush over Kerry. *The Terri Schiavo controversy. *The push for a constitutional amendment to ban gay marriage. *Attacks on Roe v. Wade. *"Intelligent design" in our science curriculum. The evangelical right has pushed all of these initiatives, led by the immense behind-the-scenes influence of Dr. James Dobson, the founder and chairman of Focus on the Family: an organization that has grown from its roots as a local parenting advice center to a powerful ministry that broadcasts Dr. Dobson each day on more than 3,000 radio and 80 television stations in the U.S. alone. Dobson has supplanted Jerry Falwell, Pat Robertson, and Ralph Reed as the spokesman for tens of millions of American evangelical Christians--even though Dobson is not a minister, but a family therapist with a doctorate in child development. Dobson maintains that the American political and social spectrums are firmly rooted in a centuries-old Christian tradition--one that has come under siege beginning in the 1960s, spear-headed by court rulings that have undermined the necessity of religion in public life. With the support of evangelical followers, Dobson has garnered more and support than many ever thought possible and has harnessed this power to wage a crusade in support of strengthening abortion restrictions and establishing anti-gay rights litigation. The Jesus Machine is the first book to examine Focus on the Family as the cutting edge of the larger evangelical movement, backing what many view to be goals in common with the current political agenda of the Bush administration, as it works to become the voice of mainstream America. Through exhaustive research, Dan Gilgoff, a Senior Reporter for US News & World Report, exposes the intricacies of the Focus on the Family's rallying cry and the drastic implications they hold for the future of America's political system.

A Christian Libertarian Looks at the Major Political Issues

Author: Peter Dellas

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 228

View: 108

After the surprise 2016 election of Donald Trump with the overwhelming support of the Evangelical vote, many have asked the question "What do Christians stand for." Political commentators have associated the so-called "Evangelical vote" with Christianity itself and noted that he received a great percentage of that demographic. And since the candidate was obviously flawed, and not a paragon of Christian virtue, many have even asked what do Evangelicals even stand for? This book attempts to answer both the objections by many concerning Christians and the Trump vote and the bigger questions of what Christians stand for. On the surface many see contradiction. But when this is seriously examined, there is no contradiction.
Political Science

Team Trump and the Evangelical White House

Author: G. J. Hocking

Publisher: G. J. Hocking

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 200

View: 351

In Team Trump and the Evangelical White House, the author paints perhaps a different picture of Donald J. Trump than you will find in the mainstream media. With so many Trump-Thumping articles, opinion pieces, and news stories doing the rounds today, it is refreshing, therefore, to get a glimpse into a different side of the Trump White House. Surprisingly, the author shows a faith-friendly president, whose relationship with evangelicals goes back nearly two decades. As the author proposes throughout--Trump's Team has energized evangelical Christians--in a way, not seen for a long time. Some even hark back in their comparisons of the current White House to the Reagan-era. This was when the well-known Moral Majority backed a former-Hollywood actor launching Ronald Reagan into the fortieth presidency. The book begins by exploring why picking V P Pence made sense in bringing evangelicals on board with the Trump agenda. You'll also see how the White House welcome mat is once again out for evangelicals as the front door is always open to people of faith. Prayer Force One will give you a glimpse; perhaps of a side of Donald Trump, you may not have seen as he prays with faith leaders. These fifteen chapters will look at how the White House was won, and may yet be won again with evangelical support in 2020.
Political Science

God at the Grassroots 2016

Author: Mark J. Rozell

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 210

View: 900

In God at the Grassroots, 2016, a distinguished group of political scientists assess the 2016 elections from the standpoint of religious conservative activism. The 2016 elections, more than any election that they have analyzed, best tell the story of the resilience of this movement and of its enduring importance.
Religion

Faith in the Voting Booth

Author: Leith Anderson

Publisher: Zondervan

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 224

View: 613

Faith in the Voting Booth by National Association of Evangelicals leaders Leith Anderson and Galen Carey will help you clarify your own positions in light of your faith before you enter the voting booth. Anderson and Carey show that biblical wisdom is surprisingly relevant to today’s complex political issues. Each voting decision should be thoughtfully and prayerfully approached. This book does not tell you how to vote. Instead it will help you resist clever campaign slogans and television ads designed to make you angry or afraid. Faith in the Voting Booth provides general principles to guide you in 2016 and for years to come. As informed faith leaders, Anderson and Carey not only identify the issues but also help you reflect biblically on how to vote. It is a book that will keep people of faith up to date and ready to vote with confidence and wisdom.