Social Science

The Girl Who Sang to the Buffalo

Author: Kent Nerburn

Publisher: New World Library

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 408

View: 557

A haunting dream that will not relent pulls author Kent Nerburn back into the hidden world of Native America, where dreams have meaning, animals are teachers, and the “old ones” still have powers beyond our understanding. In this moving narrative, we travel through the lands of the Lakota and the Ojibwe, where we encounter a strange little girl with an unnerving connection to the past, a forgotten asylum that history has tried to hide, and the complex, unforgettable characters we have come to know from Neither Wolf nor Dog and The Wolf at Twilight. Part history, part mystery, part spiritual journey and teaching story, The Girl Who Sang to the Buffalo is filled with the profound insight into humanity and Native American culture we have come to expect from Nerburn’s journeys. As the American Indian College Fund has stated, once you have encountered Nerburn’s stirring evocations of America’s high plains and incisive insights into the human heart, “you can never look at the world, or at people, the same way again.”
Juvenile Fiction

Song of the Buffalo Boy

Author: Sherry Garland

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 282

View: 640

Shunned and mistreated because of her mixed heritage, and determined to avoid an arranged marriage, seventeen-year-old Loi runs away to Ho Chi Minh City with the hope that she and the boy she loves will be able to go to the United States to find her American father.
Social Science

Voices in the Stones

Author: Kent Nerburn

Publisher: New World Library

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 184

View: 314

“Do not begrudge the white man his presence on this land. Though he doesn’t know it yet, he has come here to learn from us.” — A Shoshone elder The genius of the Native Americans has always been their profound spirituality and their deep understanding of the land and its ways. For three decades, author Kent Nerburn has lived and worked among the Native American people. Voices in the Stones is a unique collection of his encounters, experiences, and reflections during that time. He takes us inside a traditional Native feast to show us how the children are taught to respect the elders. He brings us to an isolated prairie rock outcropping where a young Native man and his father show us how the power of ceremony connects the present with the ancient voices of the past. At a dusty roadside café he introduces us to an elder who remembers the time when his ancestors could talk to animals. In these and other deeply touching stories, Nerburn reveals the spiritual awareness that animates all of Native American life, and shows us how we have much to learn from one another if only we have the heart to listen.
Hidatsa Indians

Buffalo Bird Woman's Garden

Author: Gilbert Livingstone Wilson

Publisher: Minnesota Historical Society Press

ISBN:

Category: Hidatsa Indians

Page: 129

View: 781

History

Buffalo Woman Comes Singing

Author: Brooke Medicine Eagle

Publisher: Ballantine Books

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 495

View: 975

The author traces her spiritual development, and discusses native traditions, including the medicine wheel, healing through ritual action, dream time, and the moon lodge
Social Science

The Pawnee Mythology

Author: George Amos Dorsey

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 546

View: 586

The Pawnee Mythology, originally published in 1906, preserves 148 tales of the Pawnee Indians, who farmed and hunted and lived in earth-covered lodges along the Platte River in Nebraska. The stories, collected from surviving members of four bands-Skidi, Pitahauirat, Kitkehahki, and Chaui-were generally told during intermissions of sacred ceremonies. Many were accompanied by music. George A. Dorsey recorded these Pawnee myths early in the twentieth century after the tribe's traumatic removal from their ancestral homeland to Oklahoma. He included stories of instruction concerning supernatural beings, the importance of revering such gifts as the buffalo and corn, and the results of violating nature. Hero tales, forming another group, usually centered on a poor boy who overcame all odds to benefit the tribe. Other tales invited good fortune, recognized wonderful beings like the witch women and spider women, and explained the origin of medicine powers. Coyote tales were meant to amuse while teaching ethics. George A. Dorsey (1868-1931) was a distinguished anthropologist and journalist who also wrote about the traditions of the Arapahos, Arikaras, and Osages. Douglas R. Parks is a professor of anthropology and associate director of the American Indian Studies Research Institute at Indiana University. He is the editor of James R. Murie's Ceremonies of the Pawnee (Nebraska 1989) and the editor and translator of Myths and Traditions of the Arikara Indians (Nebraska 1996).
Social Science

Lakota Belief and Ritual

Author: James R. Walker

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 329

View: 654

"The real value of Lakota Belief and Ritual is that it provides raw narratives without any pretension of synthesis or analysis, as well as insightful biographical information on the man who contributed more than any other individual to our understanding of early Oglala ritual and belief." Plains Anthropologist"In the writing of Indian history, historians and other scholars seldom have the opportunity to look at the past through 'native eyes' or to immerse themselves in documents created by Indians. For the Oglala and some of the other divisions of the Lakota, the Walker materials provide this kind of experience in fascinating and rich detail during an important transition period in their history." Minnesota History"This collection of documents is especially remarkable because it preserves individual variations of traditional wisdom from a whole generation of highly developed wicasa wakan (holy men). . . . Lakota Belief and Ritual is a wasicun (container of power) that can make traditional Lakota wisdom assume new life." American Indian Quarterly"A work of prime importance. . . . its publication represents a major addition to our knowledge of the Lakotas' way of life" Journal of American FolkloreRaymond J. DeMallie, director of the American Indian Studies Research Institute and a professor of anthropology at Indiana University, is the editor of James R. Walker's Lakota Society (1982) and of The Sixth Grandfather: Black Elk's Teachings Given to John G. Neihardt (1984, a Bison Book), both published by the University of Nebraska Press. Elaine A. Jahner, a professor of English at Dartmouth College, has edited Walker's Lakota Myth (1983), also a Bison Book.
Social Science

North American Indian Medicine Powers

Author: William Lyon

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 720

View: 261

This book is the first-ever publication to provide an in-depth overview of American Indian medicine powers. More importantly, it challenges the current notion that a belief in medicine powers is merely the result of primitive superstition. Utilizing a recent discovery in quantum mechanics, hailed by some physicists as “the greatest discovery in the history of science,” it explains how quantum mechanics principles can be used to better explain why shamans do what they do during ceremony. This results in the book taking the point of view that there is now more evidence to assume Indian medicine powers are real than to assume they are not.
Buffalo (N.Y.)

Buffalo Fifty Years Ago

Author: Lucy Williams Hawes

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Buffalo (N.Y.)

Page: 10

View: 174

Hawes writes of Buffalo in the 1830s and 1840s, and includes information on prominent early citizens, Seneca Indians, Buffalo society, and the Patriot and Mexican wars.
History

The Native Americans

Author: Robert E. Spencer

Publisher: New York : Harper & Row

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 584

View: 207

A study of the social and economic development, religion, and culture of selected Indian tribes in North America, based on archeological research
Social Science

The World We Used to Live In

Author: Vine Deloria Jr.

Publisher: Fulcrum Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 149

In his final work, the great and beloved Native American scholar Vine Deloria Jr. takes us into the realm of the spiritual and reveals through eyewitness accounts the immense power of medicine men. The World We Used To Live In, a fascinating collection of anecdotes from tribes across the country, explores everything from healing miracles and scared rituals to Navajos who could move the sun. In this compelling work, which draws upon a lifetime of scholarship, Deloria shows us how ancient powers fit into our modern understanding of science and the cosmos, and how future generations may draw strength from the old ways.
History

The Dull Knifes of Pine Ridge

Author:

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 392

View: 379

Joe Starita tells the triumphant and moving story of a Lakota-Northern Cheyenne family. In 1878, the renowned Chief Dull Knife, who fought alongside Crazy Horse, escaped from forced relocation in Indian Territory and led followers on a desperate six-hundred-mile freedom flight back to their homeland. His son, George Dull Knifeøsurvived the Wounded Knee Massacre and later toured in Buffalo Bill Cody's Wild West Show. Guy Dull Knife Sr. fought in World War I and took part in the Siege of Wounded Knee in 1973. Guy Dull Knife Jr. fought in Vietnam and is now an accomplished artist. Starita updates the Dull Knife family history in his new afterword for this Bison Books edition.
History

Women Warriors

Author: Pamela D. Toler

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 451

Who says women don’t go to war? From Vikings and African queens to cross-dressing military doctors and WWII Russian fighter pilots, these are the stories of women for whom battle was not a metaphor. The woman warrior is always cast as an anomaly—Joan of Arc, not GI Jane. But women, it turns out, have always gone to war. In this fascinating and lively world history, Pamela Toler not only introduces us to women who took up arms, she also shows why they did it and what happened when they stepped out of their traditional female roles to take on other identities. These are the stories of women who fought because they wanted to, because they had to, or because they could. Among the warriors you’ll meet are: * Tomyris, ruler of the Massagetae, who killed Cyrus the Great of Persia when he sought to invade her lands * The West African ruler Amina of Hausa, who led her warriors in a campaign of territorial expansion for more than 30 years * Boudica, who led the Celtic tribes of Britain into a massive rebellion against the Roman Empire to avenge the rapes of her daughters * The Trung sisters, Trung Trac and Trung Nhi, who led an untrained army of 80,000 troops to drive the Chinese empire out of Vietnam * The Joshigun, a group of 30 combat-trained Japanese women who fought against the forces of the Meiji emperor in the late 19th century * Lakshmi Bai, Rani of Jhansi, who was regarded as the “bravest and best” military leader in the 1857 Indian Mutiny against British rule * Maria Bochkareva, who commanded Russia’s first all-female battalion—the First Women’s Battalion of Death—during WWII * Buffalo Calf Road Woman, the Cheyenne warrior who knocked General Custer off his horse at the Battle of Little Bighorn * Juana Azurduy de Padilla, a mestiza warrior who fought in at least 16 major battles against colonizers of Latin America and who is a national hero in Bolivia and Argentina today * And many more spanning from ancient times through the 20th century. By considering the ways in which their presence has been erased from history, Toler reveals that women have always fought—not in spite of being women but because they are women.