Literary Criticism

The House in Russian Literature

Author: Joost van Baak

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 528

View: 590

The domestic theme has a tremendous anthropological, literary and cultural significance. The purpose of this book is to analyse and interpret the most important realisations and tendencies of this thematic complex in the history of Russian literature. It is the first systematic book-length exploration of the meaning and development of the House theme in Russian literature of the past 200 years. It studies the ideological, psychological and moral meanings which Russian cultural and literary tradition have invested in the house or projected on it in literary texts. Central to this study’s approach is the concept of the House Myth, consisting of a set of basic fabular elements and a set of general types of House images. This House Myth provides the general point of reference from which the literary works were analyzed and compared. With the help of this analytical procedure characteristics of individual authors could be described as well as recurrent patterns and features discerned in the way Russian literature dealt with the House and its thematics, thus reflecting characteristics of Russian literary world pictures, Russian mentalities and Russian attitudes towards life. This book is of interest for students of Russian literature as well as for those interested in the House as a cultural and literary topic, in the semiotics of literature, and in relations between culture, anthropology and literature.
Foreign Language Study

The House in Russian Literature

Author: J. J. van Baak

Publisher: Rodopi

ISBN:

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 525

View: 408

The domestic theme has a tremendous anthropological, literary and cultural significance. The purpose of this book is to analyse and interpret the most important realisations and tendencies of this thematic complex in the history of Russian literature. It is the first systematic book-length exploration of the meaning and development of the House theme in Russian literature of the past 200 years. It studies the ideological, psychological and moral meanings which Russian cultural and literary tradition have invested in the house or projected on it in literary texts. Central to this study's approach is the concept of the House Myth, consisting of a set of basic fabular elements and a set of general types of House images. This House Myth provides the general point of reference from which the literary works were analyzed and compared. With the help of this analytical procedure characteristics of individual authors could be described as well as recurrent patterns and features discerned in the way Russian literature dealt with the House and its thematics, thus reflecting characteristics of Russian literary world pictures, Russian mentalities and Russian attitudes towards life. This book is of interest for students of Russian literature as well as for those interested in the House as a cultural and literary topic, in the semiotics of literature, and in relations between culture, anthropology and literature.
Fiction

A House of Gentlefolk (Classic of Russian Literature)

Author: Ivan Turgenev

Publisher: e-artnow

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 204

View: 935

This eBook edition of "A House of Gentlefolk" has been formatted to the highest digital standards and adjusted for readability on all devices. Fyodor Ivanych Lavretsky is the child of a distant, Anglophile father and a serf mother who dies when he is very young. Lavretsky is brought up as a nobleman, at his family's country estate home, by a severe maiden aunt. He pursues an education in Moscow, and while he is studying there, he spies a beautiful Varvara Pavlovna at the opera. They fall in love, marry, and move to Paris, where Varvara Pavlovna becomes a very popular salon hostess and begins an affair with one of her frequent visitors. Shocked by her betrayal, Lavretsky severs all contact with Varvara and returns to his family estate. Upon his return, Lavretsky meets young Liza, a lovely daughter of his cousin. He starts falling in love with her when his past shows up at his door.
Literary Criticism

Reference Guide to Russian Literature

Author: Neil Cornwell

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 1012

View: 634

First Published in 1998. This volume will surely be regarded as the standard guide to Russian literature for some considerable time to come... It is therefore confidently recommended for addition to reference libraries, be they academic or public.
Fiction

Notes from the House of the Dead

Author: Fyodor Dostoevsky

Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 316

View: 615

Master translation of a neglected Russian classic into English Long before Solzhenitsyn's Gulag Archipelago came Dostoevsky's Notes from the House of the Dead, a compelling account of the horrific conditions in Siberian labor camps. First published in 1861, this novel, based on Dostoevsky's own experience as a political prisoner, is a forerunner of his famous novels Crime and Punishment and The Brothers Karamazov. The characters and situations that Dostoevsky encountered in prison were so violent and extraordinary that they changed his psyche profoundly. Through that experience, he later said, he was resurrected into a new spiritual condition -- one in which he would create some of the greatest novels ever written. Including an illuminating introduction by James Scanlan on Dostoevsky's prison years, this totally new translation by Boris Jakim captures Dostoevsky's semi-autobiographical narrative -- at times coarse, at times intensely emotional, at times philosophical -- in rich American English.
Literary Criticism

The Routledge Companion to Russian Literature

Author: Neil Cornwell

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 271

View: 638

An engaging and accessible guide to Russian writing of the past thousand years covering the entire span of Russian literature, from the Middle Ages to the post-Soviet period, and exploring all the forms that have made it so famous.
Literary Criticism

The Gothic-fantastic in Nineteenth-century Russian Literature

Author: Neil Cornwell

Publisher: Rodopi

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 293

View: 475

From the contents: From Pantheon to Pandemonium (Richard Peace). - Karamzin's Gothic tale: The Island of Bornholm (Derek Offord). - Alessandra TOSI: At the origins of the Russian Gothic novel: Nikolai Gnedich's Don Corrado de Gerrera (1803) (Alessandra Tosi). - Does Russian Gothic verse exist? The Case of Vasilii Zhukovskii (Michael Pursglove). - The fantastic in Russian Romantic prose: Pushkin's The Queen of Spades (Claire Whitehead).
History

The House of Government

Author: Yuri Slezkine

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 1128

View: 218

"Written in the tradition of Tolstoy's War and Peace, Grossman's Life and Fate, and Solzhenitsyn's The Gulag Archipelago, Yuri Slezkine's ... narrative tells the true story of the residents of an enormous Moscow apartment building where top Communist officials and their families lived before they were destroyed in Stalin's purges. [An] ... account of the personal and public lives of Bolshevik true believers, the book begins with their conversion to Communism and ends with their children's loss of faith and the fall of the Soviet Union"--Provided by publisher.
Literary Criticism

Reference Guide to Russian Literature

Author: University Prof of Russian and Comparative Literature Neil Cornwell

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 972

View: 783

"First Published in 1998, Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company."
Literary Collections

The Great Classics of Russian Literature

Author: Fyodor Dostoevsky

Publisher: e-artnow

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 8725

View: 607

Come along on a very Russian adventure with the greatest classics the world has ever known! This meticulously edited collection is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents: Introduction: The Rise of the Russian Empire Novels & Novellas: Dead Souls Oblomov Fathers and Sons Fyodor Dostoevsky: Crime and Punishment The Idiot The Brothers Karamazov Leo Tolstoy: War and Peace Anna Karenina The Death of Ivan Ilych The Kreutzer Sonata Anton Chekhov: The Steppe: The Story of a Journey Ward No. 6 Mother (Maxim Gorky) Satan's Diary (Leonid Andreyev) Plays: The Inspector General; or, The Government Inspector (Nikolai Gogol) Anton Chekhov: On the High Road Swan Song, A Play in one Act Ivanoff The Anniversary; or, the Festivities The Three Sisters The Cherry Orchard… Leo Tolstoy: The Power of Darkness The First Distiller Fruits of Culture The Live Corpse The Cause of it All The Light Shines in Darkness Leonid Andreyev: Savva The Life of Man Short Stories: The Queen of Spades The Cloak The District Doctor The Christmas Tree and the Wedding God Sees the Truth, but Waits How A Muzhik Fed Two Officials The Shades, a Phantasy The Heavenly Christmas Tree The Peasant Marey The Crocodile Bobok The Dream of a Ridiculous Man Mumu The Viy Knock, Knock, Knock The Inn Lieutenant Yergunov's Story The Dog The Watch… Russian Folk Tales & Legends: The Fiend The Dead Mother The Dead Witch The Treasure The Cross-Surety The Awful Drunkard The Bad Wife The Golovikha The Three Copecks The Miser The Fool and the Birch-Tree The Mizgir The Smith and the Demon Ivan Popyalof The Norka Marya Morevna Koshchei the Deathless The Water Snake The Water King and Vasilissa the Wise The Baba Yaga Vasilissa the Fair The Witch The Witch and the Sun's Sister One-Eyed Likho Woe… Essays: On Russian Novelists Lectures on Russian Novelists
Literary Criticism

Handbook of Russian Literature

Author: Victor Terras

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 558

View: 578

Profiles the careers of Russian authors, scholars, and critics and discusses the history of the Russian treatment of literary genres such as drama, fiction, and essays
History

Maximilian Voloshin and the Russian Literary Circle

Author: Barbara Walker

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 640

Barbara Walker examines the Russian literary circle, a feature of Russian intellectual and cultural life from tsarist times into the early Soviet period, through the life story of one of its liveliest and most adored figures, the poet Maximilian Voloshin (1877--1932). From 1911 until his death, Voloshin led a circle in the Crimean village of Koktebel' that was a haven for such literary luminaries as Marina Tsvetaeva, Nikolai Gumilev, and Osip Mandelstam. Drawing upon the anthropological theories of Victor Turner, Walker depicts the literary circle of late Imperial Russia as a contradictory mix of idealism and "communitas," on the one hand, and traditional Russian patterns of patronage and networking, on the other. While detailing the colorful history of Voloshinov's circle in the pre- and postrevolutionary decades, the book demonstrates that the literary circle and its leaders played a key role in integrating the intelligentsia into the emerging ethos of the Soviet state.
Literary Criticism

The Cambridge Companion to Twentieth-Century Russian Literature

Author: Evgeny Dobrenko

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 187

In Russian history, the twentieth century was an era of unprecedented, radical transformations - changes in social systems, political regimes, and economic structures. A number of distinctive literary schools emerged, each with their own voice, specific artistic character, and ideological background. As a single-volume compendium, the Companion provides a new perspective on Russian literary and cultural development, as it unifies both émigré literature and literature written in Russia. This volume concentrates on broad, complex, and diverse sources - from symbolism and revolutionary avant-garde writings to Stalinist, post-Stalinist, and post-Soviet prose, poetry, drama, and émigré literature, with forays into film, theatre, and literary policies, institutions and theories. The contributors present recent scholarship on historical and cultural contexts of twentieth-century literary development, and situate the most influential individual authors within these contexts, including Boris Pasternak, Alexander Solzhenitsyn, Joseph Brodsky, Osip Mandelstam, Mikhail Bulgakov and Anna Akhmatova.
Literary Criticism

A History of Russian Literature

Author: Andrew Kahn

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 860

View: 734

Russia possesses one of the richest and most admired literatures of Europe, reaching back to the eleventh century. A History of Russian Literature provides a comprehensive account of Russian writing from its earliest origins in the monastic works of Kiev up to the present day, still rife with the creative experiments of post-Soviet literary life. The volume proceeds chronologically in five parts, extending from Kievan Rus' in the 11th century to the present day.The coverage strikes a balance between extensive overview and in-depth thematic focus. Parts are organized thematically in chapters, which a number of keywords that are important literary concepts that can serve as connecting motifs and 'case studies', in-depth discussions of writers, institutions, and texts that take the reader up close and. Visual material also underscores the interrelation of the word and image at a number of points, particularly significant in the medieval period and twentieth century. The History addresses major continuities and discontinuities in the history of Russian literature across all periods, and in particular bring out trans-historical features that contribute to the notion of a national literature. The volume's time-range has the merit of identifying from the early modern period a vital set of national stereotypes and popular folklore about boundaries, space, Holy Russia, and the charismatic king that offers culturally relevant material to later writers. This volume delivers a fresh view on a series of key questions about Russia's literary history, by providing new mappings of literary history and a narrative that pursues key concepts (rather more than individual authorial careers). This holistic narrative underscores the ways in which context and text are densely woven in Russian literature, and demonstrates that the most exciting way to understand the canon and the development of tradition is through a discussion of the interrelation of major and minor figures, historical events and literary politics, literary theory and literary innovation.
Ugliness in literature

The Ugly in Russian Literature

Author: Inna Tigountsova

Publisher: LAP Lambert Academic Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Ugliness in literature

Page: 192

View: 829

Yurii Mamleev's "necrophiliac variant" of the Underground is the starting-point for Tigountsova's "third way" in Russian prose. This is an a-Soviet way (neither pro- nor dissident), connected to the paradox of Russian space - which goes on forever, even though every human being seems cramped and stuck away in corners or prison cells. Tigountsova is good with this parameter. As she notes, "even the metaphysical is cramped." Mind, house, homeland are analogues of one another. Why do walls constructed to contain space in the mind /house /homeland of Russia and Russian literature so rarely lead to coziness, manageability, efficiency, but instead to demonic possession through crevices and shabby yellow wallpaper? In Tolstaia and Petrushevskaia, this focus on distorted, deprivatized yellow space creates a sense of vulnerability and terror. Full of observations on color and insect symbolism, her study ends with provocative inquiries into Dostoevskian post-modernism as the physically ugly brought about by distortion and juxtaposition of fragments. Here we see the legacy of Romanticism, but far more crooked than anything dreamed by Bakhtin. Caryl Emerson, Princeton University
Literary Criticism

A History of Russian Literature

Author: D.S. Mirsky

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 556

View: 667

This book, first published in 1949, is an abridged version of Mirsky’s classic two texts on Russian literature, updated with a postscript by the editor assessing the development of Soviet literature. Beautifully written, Mirsky’s analyses of Russian writers and literature go hand in hand with his takes on Russian history. From the birth of Russian literature to its Soviet form, this book is a lively and comprehensive examination by one of its leading scholars.
Literary Collections

The Giants of Russian Literature: The Greatest Russian Novels, Stories, Plays, Folk Tales & Legends

Author: Fyodor Dostoevsky

Publisher: e-artnow

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 8725

View: 887

This unique collection of the greatest novesl, short stories & plays in Russian literature has been designed and formatted to the highest digital standards: Introduction: The Rise of the Russian Empire Novels & Novellas: Dead Souls Oblomov Fathers and Sons Fyodor Dostoevsky: Crime and Punishment The Idiot The Brothers Karamazov Leo Tolstoy: War and Peace Anna Karenina The Death of Ivan Ilych The Kreutzer Sonata Anton Chekhov: The Steppe: The Story of a Journey Ward No. 6 Mother (Maxim Gorky) Satan's Diary (Leonid Andreyev) Plays: The Inspector General; or, The Government Inspector (Nikolai Gogol) Anton Chekhov: On the High Road Swan Song, A Play in one Act Ivanoff The Anniversary; or, the Festivities The Three Sisters The Cherry Orchard… Leo Tolstoy: The Power of Darkness The First Distiller Fruits of Culture The Live Corpse The Cause of it All The Light Shines in Darkness Leonid Andreyev: Savva The Life of Man Short Stories: The Queen of Spades The Cloak The District Doctor The Christmas Tree and the Wedding God Sees the Truth, but Waits How A Muzhik Fed Two Officials The Shades, a Phantasy The Heavenly Christmas Tree The Peasant Marey The Crocodile Bobok The Dream of a Ridiculous Man Mumu The Viy Knock, Knock, Knock The Inn Lieutenant Yergunov's Story The Dog The Watch… Russian Folk Tales & Legends: The Fiend The Dead Mother The Dead Witch The Treasure The Cross-Surety The Awful Drunkard The Bad Wife The Golovikha The Three Copecks The Miser The Fool and the Birch-Tree The Mizgir The Smith and the Demon Ivan Popyalof The Norka Marya Morevna Koshchei the Deathless The Water Snake The Water King and Vasilissa the Wise The Baba Yaga Vasilissa the Fair The Witch The Witch and the Sun's Sister One-Eyed Likho Woe… Essays: On Russian Novelists Lectures on Russian Novelists