Literary Criticism

The Ignoble Savage

Author: Louise K. Barnett

Publisher: Praeger

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 220

View: 731

Today the Indian viewpoint is replacing the stereotypical one. Barnett confirms this attitudinal progression in excerpts from two centuries of American literature.
Political Science

Social Science and the Ignoble Savage

Author: Ronald L. Meek

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 256

View: 456

Professor Meek traces the prehistory of the four stages theory, with emphasis on the influence of literature about savage societies.
Indians of North America

The Ignoble Savage

Author: Eugene E. Reed

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Indians of North America

Page: 12

View: 711

Literary Collections

The Representation of the Savage in James Fenimore Cooper and Herman Melville

Author: Anna Krauthammer

Publisher: Peter Lang

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 118

View: 749

Since the seventeenth century, ethnicity has been the central issue in the American search for a national identity. The articulation of this issue can clearly be seen in the representation of non-white others in the literature of the nineteenth century, specifically in the works of James Fenimore Cooper and Herman Melville. This book examines how both Cooper and Melville manipulated literary images of Native Americans, African Americans, and other non-Europeans, thus revealing how America created the image of the savage - by which it was alternately attracted and repulsed - as a way of defining its own identity.

Maurice Shadbolt's Season Of The Jew and Michael Blake's Dances With Wolves

Author: Oliver Steinert-Lieschied

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 76

View: 436

Seminar paper from the year 2005 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 2,5, University of Gottingen, course: Literature of New Zealand, 19 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: Title: The Concept of the Noble / Ignoble Savage in 20th Century New World Novels: Maurice Shadbolt's Season Of The Jew and Michael Blake's Dances With Wolves Confrontation of civilized Europeans with foreign primitive" peoples has mostly been disatvantageous for the latter. The easiest way to deal with the strangeness of indigenous people was to regard them in a stereotypical way. Stereotypes such as the noble" and the ingnoble savage" were used to deprive such cultures of their humanity and to justify colonization and genocide. These stereotypes also found their way into European literature. In this work, I will analyze how the authors Maurice Shadbolt and Michael Blake deal with such stereotypes in their novels, Season Of The Jew and Dances With Wolves, respectively. I chose to compare these novels because they have many similarities but on the other hand also enough differences to make them an interesting comparison. Both novels are considered to be historical novels but there are some differences in the dealing with stereotypes, which I consider to be an important aspect of historical novels in general. Firstly, I will draw an outline of the history of the terms noble" and ignoble savage" and then make a concise definition of the terms. The next step will be a short book portrait of both novels in order to compare them to each other. In the main part of this work I will analyze how the concepts of the noble savage" and he ignoble savage" are dealt with in both novels. This will be done in consideration of various aspects which before have been presented in the definition of the terms. Exctract from the main text: d)Behaviour And Further Criteria One thing which astonished many European travellers was the missing idea of"
History

Seven Myths of Native American History

Author: Paul Jentz

Publisher: Hackett Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 263

"Misconceptions continue to shape public perceptions of American Indians. Deeply ingrained cultural fictions, what Jentz (history, North Hennepin Community College) refers to as myths, have had a lasting hold on popular understanding of Native Americans. In this readable and engaging overview, Jentz provides an important corrective, one that not only catalogs key stories and stereotypes but also lays a foundation for challenging them. As the title indicates, Jentz seeks to demystify seven fundamental ideas about American Indians through critical histories. Following a helpful introductory discussion, he devotes a chapter to each myth. Specifically, he unpacks (1) the noble savage, (2) the ignoble savage, (3) wilderness and wildness, (4) the vanishing native, (5) the authentic Indian, (6) the ecological Indian, and (7) the mystical native. Throughout, Jentz employs clear language and tangible examples to clarify each myth and its significance. [T]his work will greatly benefit nonspecialists, including high school teachers and students. The volume will be useful as either a textbook in introductory courses in Native American studies or as secondary reading. Summing Up: Highly recommended." —C. R. King, Washington State University, in Choice
French literature

Representations of the Amerindian in French Literature and the Post-Imperialist Literature of Québec

Author: James Boucher (PhD)

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: French literature

Page: 378

View: 996

My research traces the evolution of the French vision of the Indigenous peoples of the Americas by establishing a genealogy of mythic paradigms which frame how French and Quebecois authors understand the Amerindian from 1534 to present. Myth informs French visions of the Amerindian from the earliest periods of contact until the present day. My research reveals the existence of a mythic representational genealogy in the history of French (and Quebecois) letters. Through the written word, reiterations of mythologies of the Native lead to the creation of a crystallized French cultural imaginary of the Amerindian which circumscribes possibilities for reciprocal understandings between French (European) and Native peoples. The Noble and Ignoble Savage, the Ecological Savage (which I also refer to as the nexus of Nature and Native), the Vanishing Indian, and Going Native are the mythologies and narrative technologies that have mediated (and continue to mediate) French thinking about the Indigenous peoples of the Americas. Not only have these mythic paradigms determined literary representation, but they have also inordinately influenced the articulation of scientific truth about the Amerindian and the concretization of Native ontological difference from a Eurocentric perspective. The inextricable link between representation and praxis, confirmed by my insights into the mythic origins of scientific discourses (Buffon, Durkheim, Lévi-Strauss), cannot be underemphasized. The original myths in that genealogy are the Ignoble and Noble Savage. The Ignoble Savage myth presents the Amerindian as non-human, animal, or monster, in both moral and physical descriptions. The Noble Savage is an idealized portrait of the purity and innocence of Native peoples that Europeans connect to a simpler time and way of life, often seen as belonging to the past.
History

Marxism and History

Author: S. H. Rigby

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 314

View: 819

Marx's theory of history is often regarded as the most enduring and fruitful aspect of his intellectual legacy. His "historical materialism" has been the inspiration for some of the best historical writing in the works of scholars such as Eric Hobsbawm, E.P.Thompson, Rodney Hilton and Robert Brenner. S.H. Rigby establishes Marx's claims about social structure and historical change, discusses their use in his own and his followers' writings, and assesses the validity of his theories. He argues that Marx's social theories were profoundly contradictory and that Marxism has proved most useful when it is seen as a source of questions, concepts and hypotheses rather than as a philosophy of historical development.
Social Science

The Myth of the Noble Savage

Author: Ter Ellingson

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 467

View: 516

In this important and original study, the myth of the Noble Savage is an altogether different myth from the one defended or debunked by others over the years. That the concept of the Noble Savage was first invented by Rousseau in the mid-eighteenth century in order to glorify the "natural" life is easily refuted. The myth that persists is that there was ever, at any time, widespread belief in the nobility of savages. The fact is, as Ter Ellingson shows, the humanist eighteenth century actually avoided the term because of its association with the feudalist-colonialist mentality that had spawned it 150 years earlier. The Noble Savage reappeared in the mid-nineteenth century, however, when the "myth" was deliberately used to fuel anthropology's oldest and most successful hoax. Ellingson's narrative follows the career of anthropologist John Crawfurd, whose political ambition and racist agenda were well served by his construction of what was manifestly a myth of savage nobility. Generations of anthropologists have accepted the existence of the myth as fact, and Ellingson makes clear the extent to which the misdirection implicit in this circumstance can enter into struggles over human rights and racial equality. His examination of the myth's influence in the late twentieth century, ranging from the World Wide Web to anthropological debates and political confrontations, rounds out this fascinating study.
History

Ennobling Japan's Savage Northeast

Author: Nathan Hopson

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 219

"Ennobling Japan’s Savage Northeast is the first comprehensive account in English of the discursive life of the Tōhoku region in postwar Japan from 1945 through 2011. The Northeast became the subject of world attention with the March 2011 triple disaster of earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear meltdown. But Tōhoku’s history and significance to emic understandings of Japanese self and nationhood remain poorly understood. When Japan embarked on its quest to modernize in the mid-nineteenth century, historical prejudice, contemporary politics, and economic calculation together led the state to marginalize Tōhoku, creating a “backward” region in both fact and image. After 1945, a group of mostly local intellectuals attempted to overcome this image and rehabilitate the Northeast as a source of new national values. This early postwar Tōhoku recuperation movement has proved to be a critical source for the new Kyoto school’s neoconservative valorization of native Japanese identity, fueling that group’s antimodern, anti-Western discourse since the 1980s.Nathan Hopson unravels the contested postwar meanings of Tōhoku to reveal the complex and contradictory ways in which that region has been incorporated into Japan’s shifting self-images since World War II."
Political Science

Killing the Indian Maiden

Author: M. Marubbio

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 298

View: 238

Killing the Indian Maiden examines the fascinating and often disturbing portrayal of Native American women in film. M. Elise Marubbio examines the sacrificial role in which a young Native woman allies herself with a white male hero and dies as a result of that choice. In studying thirty-four Hollywood films from the silent period to the present, she draws upon theories of colonization, gender, race, and film studies to ground her analysis in broader historical and sociopolitical context and to help answer the question, “What does it mean to be an American?” The book reveals a cultural iconography embedded in the American psyche. As such, the Native American woman is a racialized and sexualized other. A conquerable body, she represents both the seductions and the dangers of the American frontier and the Manifest Destiny of the American nation to master it.
Social Science

Handbook of American Folklore

Author: Richard Mercer Dorson

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 584

View: 680

Includes material on interpretation methods and presentation of research.
Social Science

Indian Stereotypes in TV Science Fiction

Author: Sierra S. Adare

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 160

View: 818

According to an early 1990s study, 95 percent of what college students know about Native Americans was acquired through the media, leading to widespread misunderstandings of First Nations peoples. Sierra Adare contends that negative "Indian" stereotypes do physical, mental, emotional, and financial harm to First Nations individuals. At its core, this book is a social study whose purpose is to explore the responses of First Nations peoples to representative "Indian" stereotypes portrayed within the TV science fiction genre. Participants in Adare's study viewed episodes from My Favorite Martian, Star Trek, Star Trek: Voyager, Quantum Leap, The Adventures of Superman, and Star Trek: The Next Generation. Reactions by viewers range from optimism to a deep-rooted sadness. The strongest responses came after viewing a Superman episode's depiction of an "evil medicine man" who uses a ceremonial pipe to kill a warrior. The significance of First Nations peoples' responses and reactions are both surprising and profound. After publication of "Indian" Stereotypes in TV Science Fiction, ignorance can no longer be used as an excuse for Hollywood's irresponsible depiction of First Nations peoples' culture, traditions, elders, religious beliefs, and sacred objects.
Social Science

Race in American Television: Voices and Visions that Shaped a Nation [2 volumes]

Author: David J. Leonard

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 805

View: 506

This two-volume encyclopedia explores representations of people of color in American television. It includes overview essays on early, classic, and contemporary television and the challenges, developments, and participation of people of color on and behind the screen. Covering five decades, this encyclopedia highlights how race has shaped television and how television has shaped society. Offering critical analysis of moments and themes throughout television history, Race in American Television shines a spotlight on key artists of color, prominent shows, and the debates that have defined television since the Civil Rights Movement. This book also examines the ways in which television has been a site for both reproduction of stereotypes and resistance to them, providing a basis for discussion about American racial issues. This set provides a significant resource for students and fans of television alike, not only educating but also empowering readers with the necessary tools to consume and watch the small screen and explore its impact on the evolution of racial and ethnic stereotypes in U.S. culture and beyond. Understanding the history of American television contributes to deeper knowledge and potentially helps us to better apprehend the plethora of diverse shows and programs on Netflix, Hulu, YouTube, and other platforms today. Offers accessible yet critical discussions of television culture Provides historic understanding of the contributions of significant artists of color to the history of American television Discusses a diversity of shows as well as debates and themes central to the history of American television
Literary Criticism

Understanding Lord of the Flies

Author: Kirstin Olsen

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 212

View: 954

Offers excerpts dealing with major themes of Golding's novel, including the ignoble savage, education, adventure stories, religion, biology and evolution, and war and its aftermath, and suggests topics for further exploration.