Literary Criticism

The Invention of Li Yu

Author: Patrick Hanan

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 272

View: 213

Li Yu, 1610-1680, was a brilliant comic writer and entertainer, a thoroughgoing professional whose life was in his work-plays, stories, a novel, criticism, essays, and poems. Patrick Hanan places him in the society of his day, where even his precarious livelihood, his constant search for patronage, did not dampen his versatility, his irreverent wit, or his jocund spirit. Li was also an epicure, an inventor, a pundit, and a designer of houses and gardens. He was an exceptional figure in Chinese culture for two reasons: his disregard of the authority of tradition, and his dedication to the cause of comedy. Hanan uses the term "invention" in his title in several ways: Li Yu's invention of himself, his public image-his originality and inventiveness in a multitude of fields and the literary products of his inventiveness. With expert and entertaining translations Hanan explores the key features of Li Yu's work, summarizing, describing, and quoting extensively to convey Li's virtuosity, his unconventionality, his irreverence, his ribaldry. This is a splendid introduction to the art and persona of a Chinese master of style and ingenuity.
Social Science

The Chinese Virago

Author: Yenna Wu

Publisher: Harvard Univ Asia Center

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 312

View: 392

Drawing from a broad array of literary, historical, dramatic and anecdotal sources, Yenna Wu makes a rich exploration of an unusually prominent theme in premodern Chinese prose fiction and drama: that of jealous and belligerent wives, or viragos, who dominate their husbands and abuse other women. Focusing on Chinese literary works from the sixteenth to the eighteenth centuries, she presents many colorful perspectives on this type of aggression, reviewing early literary and historical examples of the phenomenon. Wu argues that although the various portraits of the virago often reveal the writers' insecurities about strong-willed women in general, the authors also satirize the kind of man whose behavioral patterns have been catalysts for female aggression. She also shows that, while the women in these works are to some extent male constructs designed to affirm the patriarchal system, various elements of these portraits constitute a subversive form of parody that casts a revealing light on the patriarchal hierarchy of premodern China.
Social Science

The Eternal Present of the Past

Author: Li-Ling Xiao

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 347

View: 198

Drawing together illustration, theater, and literature, this study examines a late Ming conception of the stage as a mystical space for temporal conflation that allowed the past to be reborn in the present and to uphold the continuity of the cultural tradition
Literary Criticism

Chinese Fiction of the Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries

Author: Patrick Hanan

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 285

View: 877

It has often been said that the nineteenth century was a relatively stagnant period for Chinese fiction, but preeminent scholar Patrick Hanan shows that the opposite is true: the finest novels of the nineteenth century show a constant experimentation and evolution. In this collection of detailed and insightful essays, Hanan examines Chinese fiction before and during the period in which Chinese writers first came into contact with western fiction. Hanan explores the uses made of fiction by westerners in China; the adaptation and integration of western methods in Chinese fiction; and the continued vitality of the Chinese fictional tradition. Some western missionaries, for example, wrote religious novels in Chinese, almost always with the aid of native assistants who tended to change aspects of the work to "fit" Chinese taste. Later, such works as Washington Irving's "Rip Van Winkle," Jonathan Swift's "A Voyage to Lilliput," the novels of Jules Verne, and French detective stories were translated into Chinese. These interventions and their effects are explored here for virtually the first time.
Literary Criticism

China and her biographical dimensions

Author: Christina Neder

Publisher: Otto Harrassowitz Verlag

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 772

View: 227

Das Buch ist dem Andenken des 1999 verstorbenen renommierten Bochumer Sinologen Helmut Martin gewidmet. Namhafte Chinawissenschaftler aus der ganzen Welt spannen in ihren Beitragen einen Bogen, der das umfangreiche ?uvre der wissenschaftlichen Arbeit Helmut Martins widerspiegelt. Nach einer personlich gehaltenen Einfuhrung zu Leben und Werk Helmut Martins konzentriert sich der Themenschwerpunkt des Bandes auf (auto-)biographische Fragestellungen in Literatur, Wissenschaft, Politik und Wirtschaft des traditionellen und des modernen Chinas. Die chinesische und taiwanesische Literatur des 20. Jahrhunderts sind hierbei besonders ins Blickfeld geruckt. Aber auch zu linguistischen Fragestellungen und den Themen Ubersetzung, Chinarezeption und -perzeption sind eine Reihe wichtiger Aufsatze enthalten. Im Anhang des Buches findet sich ein Gesamtverzeichnis der Schriften von und uber Helmut Martin.
Social Science

Playwrights and Literary Games in Seventeenth-Century China

Author: Jing Shen

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 334

View: 725

Playwrights and Literary Games in Seventeenth-Century China: Plays by Tang Xianzu, Mei Dingzuo, Wu Bing, Li Yu, and Kong Shangren is a full-length study of chuanqi (romance) drama, a sophisticated form with substantial literary and meta-theatrical value that reigned in Chinese theater from the sixteenth to eighteenth centuries and nourished later theatrical traditions including jingju (Beijing Opera). Highly educated dramatists used chuanqi to present in artistic form personal, social, and political concerns of their time. There were six outstanding examples of these trends, considered masterpieces in their time and ever since. This study presents them in their social and cultural context during the long seventeenth century (1580D1700), the period of great experimentation and political transition. The romantic spirit and independent thinking of the late Ming elite stimulated the efflorescence of the chuanqi, and that legacy was inherited and investigated during the second half of the seventeenth-century in early Qing. Jing Shen examinees the texts to demonstrate that the playwrights appropriate, convert, or misinterpret other genres or literary works of enduring influence into their plays to convey subtle and subversive expressions in the fine margins between tradition and innovation, history and theatrical re-presentation. By exploring the components of romance in texts from late Ming to early Qing, Shen reveals creative readings of earlier themes, stories, plays and the changing idea of romanticism for chuanqi drama. This study also shows the engagement of literati playwrights in closed literary circles in which chuanqi plays became a tool by which literati playwrights negotiated their agency and social stature. The five playwrights whose works are analyzed in this book had different experiences pursuing government service as scholar-officials; some failed to achieve high office. But their common concerns and self-conscious literary choices reveal important insights into the culture of the seventeenth century, and into the sociopolitical implications of the chuanqi genre. In addition to classical Chinese commentaries on chuanqi drama, this book uses modern critical theories and terminology on Western drama to enhance the analysis of chuanqi plays.
Architecture

Confucius’ Courtyard

Author: Xing Ruan

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 368

View: 649

For more than three thousand years, Chinese life – from the city and the imperial palace, to the temple, the market and the family home – was configured around the courtyard. So too were the accomplishments of China's artistic, philosophical and institutional classes. Confucius' Courtyard tells the story of how the courtyard – that most singular and persistent architectural form – holds the key to understanding, even today, much of Chinese society and culture. Part architectural history, and part introduction to the cultural and philosophical history of China, the book explores the Chinese view of the world, and reveals the extent to which this is inextricably intertwined with the ancient concept of the courtyard, a place and a way of life which, it appears, has been almost entirely overlooked in China since the middle of the 20th century, and in the West for centuries. Along the way, it provides an accessible introduction to the Confucian idea of zhongyong ('the Middle Way'), the Chinese moral universe and the virtuous good life in the absence of an awesome God, and shows how these can only be fully understood through the humble courtyard – a space which is grounded in the earth, yet open to the heavens. Erudite, elegant and illustrated throughout by the author's own architectural drawings and sketches, Confucius' Courtyard weaves together architecture, philosophy and cultural history to explore what lies at the very heart of Chinese civilization.
Literary Criticism

Competing Discourses

Author: Maram Epstein

Publisher: Harvard Univ Asia Center

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 353

View: 876

In the traditional Chinese symbolic vocabulary, the construction of gender was never far from debates about ritual propriety, desire, and even cosmic harmony. Competing Discourses maps the aesthetic and semantic meanings associated with gender in the Ming-Qing vernacular novel through close readings of five long narratives: Marriage Bonds to Awaken the World, Dream of the Red Chamber, A Country Codger's Words of Exposure, Flowers in the Mirror, and A Tale of Heroic Lovers. Epstein argues that the authors of these novels manipulated gendered terms to achieve structural coherence. These patterns are, however, frequently at odds with other gendered structures in the texts, and authors exploited these conflicts to discuss the problem of orthodox behavior versus the cult of feeling.
Literary Criticism

The Indiana Companion to Traditional Chinese Literature

Author: William H. Nienhauser

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 547

View: 890

"A vertitable feast of concise, useful, reliable, and up-to-date information (all prepared by top scholars in the field), Nienhauser's now two-volume title stands alone as THE standard reference work for the study of traditional Chinese literature. Nothing like it has ever been published." -- Choice The second volume to The Indiana Companion to Traditional Chinese Literature is both a supplement and an update to the original volume. Volume II includes over 60 new entries on famous writers, works, and genres of traditional Chinese literature, followed by an extensive bibliographic update (1985-1997) of editions, translations, and studies (primarily in English, Chinese, Japanese, French, and German) for the 500+ entries of Volume I.