Social Science

The Last “Darky”

Author: Louis Chude-Sokei

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 202

The Last “Darky” establishes Bert Williams, the comedian of the late nineteenth century and early twentieth, as central to the development of a global black modernism centered in Harlem’s Renaissance. Before integrating Broadway in 1910 via a controversial stint with the Ziegfeld Follies, Williams was already an international icon. Yet his name has faded into near obscurity, his extraordinary accomplishments forgotten largely because he performed in blackface. Louis Chude-Sokei contends that Williams’s blackface was not a display of internalized racism nor a submission to the expectations of the moment. It was an appropriation and exploration of the contradictory and potentially liberating power of racial stereotypes. Chude-Sokei makes the crucial argument that Williams’s minstrelsy negotiated the place of black immigrants in the cultural hotbed of New York City and was replicated throughout the African diaspora, from the Caribbean to Africa itself. Williams was born in the Bahamas. When performing the “darky,” he was actually masquerading as an African American. This black-on-black minstrelsy thus challenged emergent racial constructions equating “black” with African American and marginalizing the many diasporic blacks in New York. It also dramatized the practice of passing for African American common among non-American blacks in an African American–dominated Harlem. Exploring the thought of figures such as Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, and Claude McKay, Chude-Sokei situates black-on-black minstrelsy at the center of burgeoning modernist discourses of assimilation, separatism, race militancy, carnival, and internationalism. While these discourses were engaged with the question of representing the “Negro” in the context of white racism, through black-on-black minstrelsy they were also deployed against the growing international influence of African American culture and politics in the twentieth century.
Literary Criticism

The Sound of Culture

Author: Louis Chude-Sokei

Publisher: Wesleyan University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 300

View: 915

The Sound of Culture explores the histories of race and technology in a world made by slavery, colonialism, and industrialization. Beginning in the late nineteenth century and moving through to the twenty-first, the book argues for the dependent nature of those histories. Looking at American, British, and Caribbean literature, it distills a diverse range of subject matter: minstrelsy, Victorian science fiction, cybertheory, and artificial intelligence. All of these facets, according to Louis Chude-Sokei, are part of a history in which music has been central to the equation that links blacks and machines. As Chude-Sokei shows, science fiction itself has roots in racial anxieties and he traces those anxieties across two centuries and a range of writers and thinkers—from Samuel Butler, Herman Melville, and Edgar Rice Burroughs to Sigmund Freud, William Gibson, and Donna Haraway, to Norbert Weiner, Sylvia Wynter, and Samuel R. Delany.
Drama

PAJ

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page:

View: 812

Social Science

American Culture in the 1910s

Author: Mark Whalan

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 171

This book provides a fresh account of the major cultural and intellectual trends of the United State in the 1910s, a decade characterised by war, the flowering of modernism, the birth of Hollywood, and Progressive interpretations of culture and society. Chapters on fiction and poetry, art and photography, film and vaudeville, and music, theatre, and dance explore these developments, linking detailed commentary with focused case studies of influential texts and events. These range from Tarzan of the Apes to The Birth of a Nation, from the radical modernism of Gertrude Stein and the Provincetown Players to the earliest jazz recordings. A final chapter explores the huge impact of the First World War on cultural understandings of nationalism, citizenship, and propaganda.Key Features*three case studies per chapter featuring key texts, genres, writers and artists*Detailed chronology of 1910s American Culture*Bibliographies for each chapter*Fifteen black and white illustrations
African American art

Callaloo

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: African American art

Page:

View: 384

A Black South journal of arts and letters.
Performing Arts

Broadway

Author: Thomas Allen Greenfield

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 779

View: 318

Explores the influence of the "Great White Way" on American life via 200 entries spanning the era from the mid-19th century to the present. Includes spotlights on 30 landmark productions.
Performing Arts

Historical Dictionary of American Theater

Author: James Fisher

Publisher: Historical Dictionaries of Lit

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 570

View: 897

The period of 1880 to 1929 is the richest theater era in American history, certainly the number of plays produced and significant artists, as well as in the centrality of theater in the lives of Americans. As the impact of European modernism gradually seeped into American theater during the 1880s and 1890s, more traditional forms of theater gave way to futurism, symbolism, surrealism, and expressionism. Such playwrights as Eugene O'Neill, George Kelly, Elmer Rice, Philip Barry, and George S. Kaufman ushered in the golden age of American drama. Historical Dictionary of American Theater: Modernism focuses on legitimate drama, both as influenced by modernism in Europe and by the popular entertainment that also enlivened the era. This is accomplished through a chronology, an introductory essay, a bibliography, and hundreds of cross-referenced entries on plays, music, playwrights, performers, producers, critics, architects, designers, and costumes.
African Americans

Darky Days in Dixie

Author: Mary Emma Peace

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: African Americans

Page: 38

View: 892

Indiana

The Last Carousel

Author: Nelson Algren

Publisher: Penguin Adult HC/TR

ISBN:

Category: Indiana

Page: 435

View: 623

Short stories from a classic Chicago writer, featuring a colorful gallery of bums, beats, jocks, clowns, and smart alecks.
African American women

Dessa Rose

Author: Sherley Anne Williams

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: African American women

Page: 236

View: 446

Based on the lives of two nineteenth-century women, this portrait of the South during slavery focuses on the slave Dessa Rose and her relationship with a white woman, Miss Rufel.
Language Arts & Disciplines

The Last Word

Author: Laurence Urdang

Publisher: Omnigraphics Incorporated

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 281

View: 788

Presents a collection of essays and commentaries on the English language.
Confederate States of America

Southern Bivouac

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Confederate States of America

Page:

View: 852