History

The Leopard's Tale

Author: Ian Hodder

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 126

This brilliantly argued, first-hand account of the authors major discoveries at the renowned archaeological site Çatalhöyük in Turkey, described by Professor Colin Renfrew as one of the most ambitious excavation projects currently in progress, is now available in paperback. A tour de force of archaeological writing, it offers many insights into past lives and momentous events, and is superbly illustrated with images of the art, the artifacts and the excavations at this world-famous dig. It will be a must-read for archaeologists and historians everywhere.
Travel

The Leopard's Tale

Author: Jonathan Scott

Publisher: Bradt Travel Guides

ISBN:

Category: Travel

Page: 240

View: 551

Almost everyone on safari hopes for a glimpse of the charismatic and elusive leopard. Chui was the first of a new generation of leopards Jonathan Scott watched and photographed in Kenya's Masai Mara Game Reserve in the 1970s and 1980s. He spent every available moment watching and photographing Chui and her cubs, Light and Dark, aware that he was only privileged to do so for as long as they chose to remain visible. His classic account tells the story of the mother leopard as a solitary hunter providing for herself and her offspring. He records encounters with baboon, hyaena and man, hazards facing the cubs as they learn to fend for themselves and periods of play and relaxation. Some years after Chui disappeared, a young female appeared, Half-Tail. Jonathan and Angela have followed her and her daughter Zawadi, stars of the BBC's Big Cat Diary, for the past twenty years, bringing the story up to date. Nobody has studied leopards more closely or known them more intimatelyJonathan says: 'The update is based on our work with Half-Tail and Zawadi from both the pictures and text perspective - Angie worked with us on Big Cat Diary as the stills photographer from 1996 and before that we both worked with Half-Tail from the time she first appeared around Leopard Gorge and Fig Tree Ridge - our kids grew up on safari with Half-Tail and Zawadi as stars of their own Mara adventures.'
Biography & Autobiography

The Big Cat Man

Author: Jonathan Scott

Publisher: Bradt Travel Guides

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 336

View: 394

The Big Cat Man - wildlife autobiography of Jonathan Scott, holiday reads and travel literature, including the BBC's Big Cat Diary, Paramount's Wild Things, and Elephant Diaries. Also included are photographs and illustrations by Jonathan and Angela Scott, plus coverage of the Maasai Mara and Serengeti, Antarctica, and travels to India and Bhutan.
Art

Cultural Histories of the Material World

Author: Peter N. Miller

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 295

View: 590

All across the humanities fields there is a new interest in materials and materiality. This is the first book to capture and study the “material turn” in the humanities from all its varied perspectives. Cultural Histories of the Material World brings together top scholars from all these different fields—from Art History, Anthropology, Archaeology, Classics, Folklore, History, History of Science, Literature, Philosophy—to offer their vision of what cultural history of the material world looks like and attempt to show how attention to materiality can contribute to a more precise historical understanding of specific times, places, ways, and means. The result is a spectacular kaleidoscope of future possibilities and new perspectives.
Social Science

Archaeology in the Making

Author: William L Rathje

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 448

View: 140

Archaeology in the Making is a collection of bold statements about archaeology, its history, how it works, and why it is more important than ever. This book comprises conversations about archaeology among some of its notable contemporary figures. They delve deeply into the questions that have come to fascinate archaeologists over the last forty years or so, those that concern major events in human history such as the origins of agriculture and the state, and questions about the way archaeologists go about their work. Many of the conversations highlight quite intensely held personal insight into what motivates us to pursue archaeology; some may even be termed outrageous in the light they shed on the way archaeological institutions operate – excavation teams, professional associations, university departments. Archaeology in the Making is a unique document detailing the history of archaeology in second half of the 20th century to the present day through the words of some of its key proponents. It will be invaluable for anybody who wants to understand the theory and practice of this ever developing discipline.

Flora Unveiled

Author: Professor Emeritus of Molecular and Developmental Biology Lincoln Taiz

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 520

View: 160

Sex in animals has been known for at least ten thousand years, and this knowledge was put to good use during animal domestication in the Neolithic period. In stark contrast, sex in plants wasn't discovered until the late 17th century, long after the domestication of crop plants. Even after its discovery, the "sexual theory" continued to be hotly debated and lampooned for another 150 years, pitting the "sexualists" against the "asexualists." Why was the notion of sex in plants so contentious for so long? "Flora Unveiled" is a deep history of perceptions about plant gender and sexuality, beginning in the Ice Age and ending in the middle of the nineteenth century, with the elucidation of the complete plant life cycle. Linc and Lee Taiz show that a gender bias that plants are unisexual and female (a "one-sex model") prevented the discovery of plant sex and delayed its acceptance long after the theory was definitively proven. The book explores the various sources of this gender bias, beginning with women's role as gatherers, crop domesticators, and the first farmers. In the myths and religions of the Bronze and Iron Ages, female deities were strongly identified with flowers, trees, and agricultural abundance, and during Middle Ages and Renaissance, this tradition was assimilated into Christianity in the person of Mary. The one-sex model of plants continued into the Early Modern Period, and experienced a resurgence during the eighteenth century Enlightenment and again in the nineteenth century Romantic movement. Not until Wilhelm Hofmeister demonstrated the universality of sex in the plant kingdom was the controversy over plant sex finally laid to rest. Although "Flora Unveiled" focuses on the discovery of sex in plants, the history serves as a cautionary tale of how strongly and persistently cultural biases can impede the discovery and delay the acceptance of scientific advances.
Social Science

Deconstructing Olduvai: A Taphonomic Study of the Bed I Sites

Author: Manuel Domínguez-Rodrigo

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 292

View: 903

The Olduvai Bed I archaeological sites have been at the epicenter of the debate on how early humans behaved. This book presents a new analytical approach that has produced unexpected results: the association of stone tools and faunal remains at most Olduvai Bed I sites is accidental and not related to hominid behavior. This revolutionary analysis shows that current models of reconstruction of human behavior are wrong.
Juvenile Fiction

The Leopard's Drum

Author: Jessica Souhami

Publisher: Frances Lincoln Childrens Books

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 32

View: 392

This tortoise-and-leopard tale has multicultural appeal."Adapted from characters created for [the author's] own travelling puppet shows, they startle and enchant like shadow puppets in a live performance." -IndependentAges 3-7
Social Science

A Humanitarian Past

Author: Adele Änggård

Publisher: AuthorHouse

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 310

View: 135

This book opens a window on our historical past. We find antiquity has drawn a blind over earlier and more humanitarian cultures, writing off their artistic and egalitarian practices – while antiquity’s social habits escalated stress. Psychologists have recently made us aware that stress has very negative results for community life. Simultaneously, archaeologists have uncovered information about Neolithic cultures and art that makes no sense seen beside ancient Greek descriptions. The more we learn about Old Europe, the more staggering and distorted the policies conveyed in ancient Greek myths, dramas, and epic poems become. Surprisingly, the Achaeans also show an intimate knowledge about their predecessor’s social values. Sadly, the Renaissance uncritically fell for the ancient Greek’s version of history, seeing it as the cradle of civilisation and our cultural heritage. They have even passed on these ideas to us today. Discovering A Humanitarian Past pitches us into an exciting and previously unexplored part of the human story.