Science

The Life and Death of Stars

Author: Kenneth R. Lang

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 332

View: 760

In an illustrated, accessible text, the author explains the life cycle of stars, from dense molecular clouds to the enigmatic nebulae some stars leave behind in their violent ends.
Science

Observer’s Guide to Stellar Evolution

Author: Michael Inglis

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 236

View: 940

Stellar evolution - the birth, development and death of stars - is central to our current understanding of astronomy, but surprisingly the majority of amateur astronomers lack a full understanding of the physics of stars. Current books on the market tend to be highly theoretical and off-putting, in Observer's Guide to Stellar Evolution, Mike Inglis brings this subject to life in a unique way. By combining a step-by-step introduction with suggestions for practical observations of stars at different stages in their evolution, amateur astronomers regardless of their current level of knowledge, will find this book fascinating and informative. -Accessible to every amateur astronomer, regardless of background knowledge. -Step-by-step introduction to the theory of stellar evolution. -Includes many examples of stars at different stages in their evolution, that the reader can observe for him/herself. -Mathematics is made accessible by being presented in 'boxes'that readers can skip over if they prefer!
Science

100 Billion Suns

Author: Rudolf Kippenhahn

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 268

View: 272

How are the nuclear power plants we call "stars" formed? Where do they get their energy and how do they die-- and what does this suggest about the future of the universe? One of the most popular books written on astrophysics, 100 Billion Suns provides an exhilarating and authoritative life history of the stars.How are the nuclear power plants we call "stars" formed? Where do they get their energy and how do they die-- and what does this suggest about the future of the universe? One of the most popular books written on astrophysics, 100 Billion Suns provides an exhilarating and authoritative life history of the stars.
Science

Life and Death of the Stars

Author: Ganesan Srinivasan

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 225

View: 685

This volume is devoted to one of the fascinating things about stars: how they evolve as they age. This evolution is different for stars of different masses. How stars end their lives when their supply of energy is exhausted also depends on their masses. Interestingly, astronomers conjectured about the ultimate fate of the stars even before the details of their evolution became clear. Part I of this book gives an account of the remarkable predictions made during the 1920s and 1930s concerning the ultimate fate of stars. Since much of this development hinged on quantum physics that emerged during this time, a detailed introduction to the relevant physics is included in the book. Part II is a summary of the life history of stars. This discussion is divided into three parts: low-mass stars, like our Sun, intermediate-mass stars, and massive stars. Many of the concepts of contemporary astrophysics were built on the foundation erected by Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar in the 1930s. This book, written during his birth centenary, includes a brief biographical sketch of the brilliant scientist, which readers will find fascinating. Reading this book will get young students excited about the presently unfolding revolution in astronomy and the challenges that await them in the world of physics, engineering and technology. General readers will also find the book appealing for its highly accessible narrative of the physics of stars. This book is a companion volume of “What are the Stars?” by the same author. "I know of no other book on the evolution of stars of a similar scope and breadth that is so accessible for undergraduate students." E P J van den Heuvel Professor of Astrophysics Winner of the Spinoza and Descartes PrizesUniversity of Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Stars

Stars, Their Birth, Life, and Death

Author: I. S. Shklovskiĭ

Publisher: W.H. Freeman

ISBN:

Category: Stars

Page: 442

View: 891

Astronomy is the most ancient, yet the youngest of the sciences. From time out of mind people have been baffled as to what may lie beyond their experiece. About a work in the stellar realm, embracing the full solr cycle but envincing none of the alleged deficiences of composition at solaar minimum.
Science

The Life of Stars

Author: Giora Shaviv

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 504

View: 552

It is the stars, The stars above us, govern our conditions. William Shakespeare, King Lear A Few Words about What, Why and How The structure of the stars in general, and the Sun in particular, has been the subject of extensivescienti?cresearchanddebateforoveracentury.Thediscoveryofquantum theoryduringthe?rsthalfofthenineteenthcenturyprovidedmuchofthetheoretical background needed to understand the making of the stars and how they live off their energysource. Progress in the theoryof stellar structurewasmade through extensive discussions and controversies between the giants of the ?elds, as well as brilliant discoveries by astronomers. In this book, we shall carefully expose the building of the theory of stellar structure and evolution, and explain how our understanding of the stars has emerged from this background of incessant debate. About hundred years were required for astrophysics to answer the crucial ques tions: What is the energy source of the stars? How are the stars made? How do they evolve and eventually die? The answers to these questions have profound im plications for astrophysics, physics, and biology, and the question of how we our selves come to be here. While we already possess many of the answers, the theory of stellar structure is far from being complete, and there are many open questions, for example, concerning the mechanisms which trigger giant supernova explosions. Many internal hydrodynamic processes remain a mystery. Yet some global pictures can indeed be outlined, and this is what we shall attempt to do here.
Science

Evolution and the Emergent Self

Author: Raymond L. Neubauer

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 320

View: 479

Evolution and the Emergent Self is an eloquent and evocative new synthesis that explores how the human species emerged from the cosmic dust. Lucidly presenting ideas about the rise of complexity in our genetic, neuronal, ecological, and ultimately cosmological settings, the author takes readers on a provocative tour of modern science's quest to understand our place in nature and in our universe. Readers fascinated with "Big History" and drawn to examine big ideas will be challenged and enthralled by Raymond L. Neubauer's ambitious narrative. How did humans emerge from the cosmos and the pre-biotic Earth, and what mechanisms of biological, chemical, and physical sciences drove this increasingly complex process? Neubauer presents a view of nature that describes the rising complexity of life in terms of increasing information content, first in genes and then in brains. The evolution of the nervous system expanded the capacity of organisms to store information, making learning possible. In key chapters, the author portrays four species with high brain:body ratios—chimpanzees, elephants, ravens, and dolphins—showing how each species shares with humans the capacity for complex communication, elaborate social relationships, flexible behavior, tool use, and powers of abstraction. A large brain can have a hierarchical arrangement of circuits that facilitates higher levels of abstraction. Neubauer describes this constellation of qualities as an emergent self, arguing that self-awareness is nascent in several species besides humans and that potential human characteristics are embedded in the evolutionary process and have emerged repeatedly in a variety of lineages on our planet. He ultimately demonstrates that human culture is not a unique offshoot of a language-specialized primate, but an analogue of fundamental mechanisms that organisms have used since the beginning of life on Earth to gather and process information in order to buffer themselves from fluctuations in the environment. Neubauer also views these developments in a cosmic setting, detailing open thermodynamic systems that grow more complex as the energy flowing through them increases. Similar processes of increasing complexity can be found in the "self-organizing" structures of both living and nonliving forms. Recent evidence from astronomy indicates that planet formation may be nearly as frequent as star formation. Since life makes use of the elements commonly seeded into space by burning and expiring stars, it is reasonable to speculate that the evolution of life and intelligence that happened on our planet may be found across the universe.
Science

Astronomy Made Simple

Author: Kevin B. Marvel, Ph.D.

Publisher: Broadway Books

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 240

View: 184

See the skies in a whole new light. Take a tour of the universe, from our local solar system to the far reaches of deepest space. Astronomy Made Simple offers a complete introduction to this science, from its birth in ancient times to the different types of super-powerful telescopes scientists use today. It also includes detailed instructions on how to map the stars and understand the coordinate system, as well as fun sidebars, ideas for projects for further learning, and resources for the student or the amateur astronomer.
Performing Arts

The Life and Death of Thelma Todd

Author: William Donati

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 248

View: 595

American film favorite Thelma Todd was much more than the beautiful blonde of the 1930s who played opposite Buster Keaton, Laurel and Hardy and the Marx Brothers. Todd’s tragic death transformed her into an icon of Hollywood mystery: The photograph of the 29-year-old actress slumped in her luxurious Lincoln Phaeton shocked fans in 1935. How did she die? Was it murder, suicide, or an accident? This definitive biography covers a fascinating era in Hollywood history. In the course of his exhaustive research, the author interviewed Todd’s cousins Bill and Edna Todd, as well as such friends and coworkers as Ida Lupino, Lina Basquette, Anita Garvin, Dorothy Granger, William Bakewell and Greg Blackton. Also examined is Hollywood’s first major sex scandal of 1913, involving Jewel Carmen, the future spouse of director Roland West—the man Thelma Todd loved.
Science

Triggered Star Formation in a Turbulent Interstellar Medium (IAU S237)

Author: International Astronomical Union. Symposium

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 509

View: 845

New stars form in the dense turbulent gas clouds of galaxies, and the formation of these clouds is the subject of the IAU S237. This book is the most up-to-date review of all aspects of cloud and star formation, and one of the few compendiums available on ISM turbulence.