Authors, English

The Life of Graham Greene: 1939-1955

Author: Norman Sherry

Publisher: Jonathan Cape

ISBN:

Category: Authors, English

Page: 562

View: 899

The second of Norman Sherry's three-part biography, encompassing the most creative period of Green's life in terms of novels and films. It also saw the disintegration of his marriage, and his enrolment as a secret agent. In the 1950s Greene was increasingly drawn to the world's trouble spots.
Biography & Autobiography

The Life Of Graham Greene Volume Two

Author: Norman Sherry

Publisher: Random House

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 592

View: 234

The years from 1939 to 1955 proved to be the most prolific of Graham Greene's life. In The Life of Graham Greene, Volume II, Norman Sherry continues his engrossing account, delving deeply and emerging with a portrait of the author at the height of both his spying and literary careers. Greene produced some of his best novels during this time - The Heart of the Matter, The End of the Affair, The Quiet American - and saw the filming of The Fallen Idol and The Third Man. The same period encompasses his passionate affair with the beautiful American Catherine Watson, who was married to a British peer, the disintegration of his marriage, his long relationship with Dorothy Glover, his activities as a secret agent and his forays into the conflicts in Kenya, Malaya, and French Indo-China. As with The Life of Graham Greene Volume I: 1904-1939, Norman Sherry succeeds in unlocking the mystery of Greene's character and the alchemic nature of his creative genius.

The Life of Graham Greene

Author: Norman Sherry

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 646

This second volume of the three volume biography describes Greene's writing career, his passionate affair with an American, the disintegration of his marriage as well as his activities as a secret agent.
Biography & Autobiography

The Life of Graham Greene: 1904-1939

Author: Norman Sherry

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 816

View: 958

Unquestionably one of the greatest novelists of his time, Graham Greene had always guarded his privacy, remaining aloof, mysterious and unpredictable. Nonetheless, he took the surprising step of allowing Norman Sherry complete access to his letters and diaries, and gave his consent to this full and frank biography in three volumes — the first of which takes Greene’s life up to the beginning of the Second World War when he published some of his most remarkable work, including: Journey Without Maps, England Made Me, A Gun for Sale, Brighton Rock, and The Confidential Agent. At the heart of the story lies a remarkable series of letters Greene wrote to his wife, Vivien, for whose sake he became a Catholic. They show us an unknown, younger Greene, impassioned and romantic. Sherry also recounts in fascinating detail how Greene struggled to turn himself into a novelist and learn his craft, and follows his subject’s pre-war footsteps to West Africa and Mexico, where he was able to penetrate far into the strange and alarming territory that Greene has made his own. The book that emerges is without doubt one of the most revealing literary biographies of the decade.
Biography & Autobiography

The Life of Graham Greene: 1955-1991

Author: Norman Sherry

Publisher: Penguin Group USA

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 906

View: 905

The third and final volume of a masterful biography of Graham Greene marks the centenary of the author's birth, following Greene, an agent for the British government, from prerevolutionary Cuba and the Belgian Congo, through adulterous interludes, to his relationships with other literary luminaries, drawing on personal interviews, letters, and diaries to capture the complex world of Graham Greene. Reprint.
Biography & Autobiography

The Life of Graham Greene Volume Three

Author: Norman Sherry

Publisher: Random House

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 944

View: 149

The much-anticipated third and final volume of Norman Sherry's biography follows the tireless wanderings of Graham Greene, the writer's final forays into the fulminating trouble spots of the world which beckoned as sirens all his days. From the perils of Batista's Cuba, the privations of the Belgian Congo and the tumult of Haiti, Nicaragua and Panama, to his confrontation with the French mafia, his travels in Spain and, finally, his quiet death in Switzerland at the age of eighty-six. The rigour and attention to detail that gained praise for the first two volumes remains undiminished as Sherry retraces Greene's footsteps, criss-crossing the globe to visit the places that inspired Greene's novels and meeting the people who provided the models for some of literature's most memorable characters: the whiskey priest; the honorary consul; the zany aunt. Never losing sight of the very real religious, emotional and political struggles that made up Greene's complicated personality - his constantly questioned but never abandoned Catholicism, his two long-term affairs with married women, his determination to stand up for the victims of injustice - Sherry illuminates Greene's mind, methods and motivation with an unswervingly critical, yet always compassionate eye. With exclusive access to Greene's letters, journals and dream-diaries, Norman Sherry has written a monumental tribute to one of the greatest of English writers. The three volumes of The Life of Graham Greene will remain the standard work on Greene for decades to come.
Biography & Autobiography

The Life of Graham Greene

Author: Norman Sherry

Publisher: Key Porter Books

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 783

View: 558

"An astonishingly thorough yet readable story, hard-nosed yet sympathetic...." - Margaret Atwood (1995)
Literary Criticism

The Works of Graham Greene, Volume 2

Author: Mike Hill

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 336

View: 277

Over a 60-year career, Graham Greene was a prolific writer. While his published works established him as one of the great writers of the twentieth century, much of his writing was never to see the light of day and has been gathered together in a number of archives across the UK, Ireland, USA and Canada The second volume of The Works of Graham Greene is a comprehensive guide to the archives of Greene's writing. The book details archival holdings of unpublished novels, short stories, plays, film scripts, journals, poetry, fragments of writing, and letters, as well as manuscripts and typescripts of published works. Analysing and contextualising the unpublished work, the book is fully cross-referenced throughout and includes a substantial index as well as practical guidance for students, scholars and researchers on accessing and making the most of each of the archives.
Biography & Autobiography

Literary Converts

Author: Joseph Pearce

Publisher: Ignatius Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 452

View: 274

Biography & Autobiography

The Life Of Graham Greene Volume 1

Author: Norman Sherry

Publisher: Random House

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 816

View: 224

Unquestionably one of the greatest novelists of his time, Graham Greene had always guarded his privacy, remaining aloof, mysterious and unpredictable. Nonetheless, he took the surprising step of allowing Norman Sherry complete access to letter and diaries, and gave his consent to this full and frank biography in three volumes - the first of which takes Greene's life up to the beginning of the Second World War when he published some of his most remarkable work, including Journey Without Maps (1935), England Made Me (1935), A Gun for Sale (1936), Brighton Rock (1938) and The Confidential Agent (1939). At the heart of the story lies a remarkable series of letters Greene wrote to his wife, Vivien, for whose sake he became a Catholic. They show us an unknown, younger Greene, impassioned and romantic. Sherry also recounts in fascinating detail how Greene struggled to turn himself into a novelist and learn his craft, and follows his subject's pre-war footsteps to West Africa and Mexico, where he was able to penetrate far into the strange and alarming territory that Greene has made his own. The book that emerges is without doubt one of the most revealing literary biographies of the decade.
Biography & Autobiography

The Quest For Graham Greene

Author: W. J. West

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 336

View: 448

W.J. West has unearthed and pieced together all-new material regarding Graham Greene, which sheds light into the darker regions of Greene's personal, religious, financial, and international affairs. Based on information gleaned from private archives and a cache of letters belonging to thriller writer Rene Raymond (known to his reading public as James Hadley Chase) West exposes, among other information, the reasons behind Greene's sudden, self-imposed exile from England. What the Chase letters show is that Greene and Chase shared the same tax consultant and that the two men, along with Charlie Chaplin and Noel Coward, became unwittingly embroiled in a tax evasion and fraud operation scandal with roots in the Hollywood mafia. Through further investigation, West also uncovers the origins of Greene's literary ambitions and his obsession with Catholicism, as well as new discoveries concerning Greene's crucial mental breakdown as a teenager. West also reveals more information on Greene's involvement with espionage, M16, and his ties with Kim Philby.
Biography & Autobiography

Our Man Down in Havana

Author: Christopher Hull

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 384

View: 209

When U.S. immigration authorities deported Graham Greene from Puerto Rico in 1954, the British author made an unplanned visit to Havana and the former MI6 officer had stumbled upon the ideal setting for a comic espionage story. Three years later, he returned in the midst of Castro’s guerrilla insurgency against a U.S.-backed dictator to begin writing his iconic novel Our Man in Havana. Twelve weeks after its publication, in January 1959, the Cuban Revolution triumphed, soon transforming a capitalist playground into a communist stronghold.Combining biography, history, politics, and a measure of psychoanalysis, Our Man Down in Havana investigates the real story behind Greene’s fiction. It includes his many visits to a pleasure island that became a revolutionary island, turning his chance involvement into a political commitment. His Cuban novel describes an amateur agent who dupes his intelligence chiefs with invented reports about “concrete platforms and unidentifiable pieces of giant machinery.” With eerie prescience, Greene’s satirical tale had foretold the Cold War’s most perilous episode, the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis.
Fiction

The Collected Novels Volume Two

Author: Graham Greene

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 1060

View: 181

From “the most ingenious, inventive, and exciting of our novelists”: Three brilliant novels exploring colonialism, faith, and the mysteries of desire (V. S. Pritchett). This collection features three classic novels that explore Graham Greene’s most important themes: Catholicism, international intrigue, and the never-ending struggle to know oneself. From West Africa to Vietnam to Mexico, these stories prove that “no serious writer of [the twentieth] century has more thoroughly invaded and shaped the public imagination than Graham Greene” (Time). The Heart of the Matter: In a British colony of West Africa, Henry Scobie is a pious man of modest means charged with securing borders. But when he’s passed over for a promotion, the humiliation hits hard—for his wife. To make it up to her, Henry accepts a loan from a black marketeer to secure Louise’s passage out of Africa. His single indiscretion quickly leads him—one moral compromise after another—into a web of blackmail, adultery, and murder. “A powerful, deep-striking novel . . . of a spirit lost in the darkness of the flesh.” —New York Herald Tribune The Quiet American: Vietnam, 1955. British journalist Thomas Fowler is covering the insurgency against French colonial rule and doing what he can to protect his Vietnamese lover, Phuong. Alden Pyle of the CIA believes in bringing American democracy to Vietnam by any means necessary. But when his ideas of conquest come to include Phuong, pride, passion, and blind moral conviction collide with terrible consequences. “A heartrending romance . . . Haunting and profound.” —All Things Considered, NPR The Power and the Glory: In 1930s Tabasco, Mexico, Catholicism is being outlawed. As churches are razed and devotees are executed, a member of the clergy known only as the “whisky priest” flees. He now travels as one of the hunted—attending, in secret, to the spiritual needs of the faithful. When a peasant begs him to return to Tabasco to hear the confessions of a dying man, the whisky priest knows it’s a trap. But it’s also his duty—and possibly his salvation. “A thriller—but also a novel of ideas . . . A book I would have simply died to write.” —Scott Turow, New York Times–bestselling author
Literary Criticism

Innocence in Graham Greene's Novels

Author: Shoko Miyano

Publisher: Peter Lang

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 122

View: 462

Graham Greene once wrote that «Innocence is a kind of insanity.» This book examines the many shades of innocence in Greene's characters: the «blank innocence,» «depraved innocence,» and «absurd innocence» of Anthony Farrant; the piteous innocence of Pinkie; the simple innocence of Raven; the pure innocence of Father Quixote; the paradoxical innocence of the Whisky Priest; the inverted innocence of Sarah Miles; the faithful innocence of Father Rivas, the Dog-Ears Priest; the intrusive innocence of Doctor Fischer; and the playful innocence of Harry Lime. The complex concept of innocence is found to be a prevailing theme in Greene's novels.
Literary Criticism

Graham Greene and the Politics of Popular Fiction and Film

Author: B. Thomson

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 248

View: 997

One of the most popular, respected and controversial writers of the twentieth century, Greene's work has still attracted relatively little scholarly comment. Thomson charts the intricate dance between his novels and screenplays, his many audiences, and an intellectual establishment reluctant to identify the work of a popular writer as 'literature'.
Literary Criticism

Dangerous Edges of Graham Greene

Author: Dermot Gilvary

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 352

View: 564

Informative, broad-ranging, and sheds new light on the life and literary art of one of the last century's most celebrated authors.
Literary Criticism

British Spy Fiction and the End of Empire

Author: Sam Goodman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 186

View: 995

The position of spy fiction is largely synonymous in popular culture with ideas of patriotism and national security, with the spy himself indicative of the defence of British interests and the preservation of British power around the globe. This book reveals a more complicated side to these assumptions than typically perceived, arguing that the representation of space and power within spy fiction is more complex than commonly assumed. Instead of the British spy tirelessly maintaining the integrity of Empire, this volume illustrates how spy fiction contains disunities and disjunctions in its representation of space, and the relationship between the individual and the state in an era of declining British power. Focusing primarily on the work of Graham Greene, Ian Fleming, Len Deighton, and John le Carre, the volume brings a fresh methodological approach to the study of spy fiction and Cold War culture. It presents close textual analysis within a framework of spatial and sovereign theory as a means of examining the cultural impact of decolonization and the shifting geopolitics of the Cold War. Adopting a thematic approach to the analysis of space in spy fiction, the text explores the reciprocal process by which contextual history intersects with literature throughout the period in question, arguing that spy fiction is responsible for reflecting, strengthening and, in some cases, precipitating cultural anxieties over decolonization and the end of Empire. This study promises to be a welcome addition to the developing field of spy fiction criticism and popular culture studies. Both engaging and original in its approach, it will be important reading for students and academics engaged in the study of Cold War culture, popular literature, and the changing state of British identity over the course of the latter twentieth century.