Literary Criticism

The Literary Tourist

Author: N. Watson

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 244

View: 978

This original, witty, illustrated study offers the first analytical history of the rise and development of literary tourism in nineteenth-century Britain, associated with authors from Shakespeare, Gray, Keats, Burns and Scott, the Brontë sisters, and Thomas Hardy. Invaluable for the student of travel and literature of the nineteenth century.
Literary Criticism

Literary Tourism and Nineteenth-Century Culture

Author: N. Watson

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 230

View: 935

This book offers both an introduction to the vibrant field of literary tourism studies and a selection of cutting-edge cross-disciplinary research. Indispensable for students and scholars of nineteenth-century literature and culture, it provides fascinating insights into the reception of, amongst others, Shakespeare, Dickens, Byron and Wordsworth.
Business & Economics

Heritage, Screen and Literary Tourism

Author: Dr. Sheela Agarwal

Publisher: Channel View Publications

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 332

View: 233

This book examines the main issues and concepts relating to heritage, screen and literary tourism (HSLT) and provides a comprehensive understanding and evaluation of these three forms of tourism in the context of global tourism development. It analyses the demand and supply of HSLT within the frameworks provided by service-dominant logic and value creation to enable a critical perspective on how HSLT tourist experiences are created, produced and shaped. The volume explores the challenges which relate to the role of the consumer in the co-creation of the tourist experience, and the implications this has for the development, marketing, interpretation, consumption, planning and management of HSLT. It will appeal to researchers and students of heritage tourism, film and literary tourism, media-driven tourism, tourism planning and destination development and management.
Poetry

The Literary Tourist

Author: White Mountain Writers Group (N.H.)

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Poetry

Page: 113

View: 302

Business & Economics

Literary Tourism

Author: Ian Jenkins

Publisher: CABI

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 210

View: 571

Literary tourism is a nascent field in tourism studies, yet tourists often travel in the footsteps of well-known authors and stories. Providing a wide-ranging cornucopia of literary tourism topics, this book fully explores the interconnections between the written word and travel. It includes tourism stories using guidebooks, films, television and electronic media, and recognises that stories, texts and narratives, even if they cannot be classified as traditional travel writing, can become journeys in themselves and take us on imaginary voyages. Appealing to a wide audience of different disciplines, it encompasses subjects such as business literary writing, historical journeys and the poetry of Dylan Thomas. The use of these different perspectives demonstrates how heavily and widely literature influences travel, tourists and tourism, making it an important read for researchers and students of tourism, social science and literature.
Literary Criticism

Literary Tourism and the British Isles

Author: LuAnn McCracken Fletcher

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 348

View: 106

This book is an interdisciplinary exploration of literary tourism’s role in shaping how locations in the British and Irish Isles have been seen, narrated, and valued. It explores the consequences of fictional constructions for the history, economics, and cultural politics of place, and for the Britain internalized in the mind’s eye.
Travel

Mark Twain's Homes and Literary Tourism

Author: Hilary Iris Lowe

Publisher: University of Missouri Press

ISBN:

Category: Travel

Page: 264

View: 979

A century after Samuel Clemens’s death, Mark Twain thrives—his recently released autobiography topped bestseller lists. One way fans still celebrate the first true American writer and his work is by visiting any number of Mark Twain destinations. They believe they can learn something unique by visiting the places where he lived. Mark Twain’s Homes and Literary Tourism untangles the complicated ways that Clemens’s houses, now museums, have come to tell the stories that they do about Twain and, in the process, reminds us that the sites themselves are the products of multiple agendas and, in some cases, unpleasant histories. Hilary Iris Lowe leads us through four Twain homes, beginning at the beginning—Florida, Missouri, where Clemens was born. Today the site is simply a concrete pedestal missing its bust, a plaque, and an otherwise-empty field. Though the original cabin where he was born likely no longer exists, Lowe treats us to an overview of the history of the area and the state park challenged with somehow marking this site. Next, we travel with Lowe to Hannibal, Missouri, Clemens’s childhood home, which he saw become a tourist destination in his own lifetime. Today mannequins remind visitors of the man that the boy who lived there became and the literature that grew out of his experiences in the house and little town on the Mississippi. Hartford, Connecticut, boasts one of Clemens’s only surviving adulthood homes, the house where he spent his most productive years. Lowe describes the house’s construction, its sale when the high cost of living led the family to seek residence abroad, and its transformation into the museum. Lastly, we travel to Elmira, New York, where Clemens spent many summers with his family at Quarry Farm. His study is the only room at this destination open to the public, and yet, tourists follow in the footsteps of literary pilgrim Rudyard Kipling to see this small space. Literary historic sites pin their authority on the promise of exclusive insight into authors and texts through firsthand experience. As tempting as it is to accept the authenticity of Clemens’s homes, Mark Twain’s Homes and Literary Tourism argues that house museums are not reliable critical texts but are instead carefully constructed spaces designed to satisfy visitors. This volume shows us how these houses’ portrayals of Clemens change frequently to accommodate and shape our own expectations of the author and his work.
Literary Criticism

The Author's Effects

Author: Nicola J. Watson

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 352

View: 454

The Author's Effects: On the Writer's House Museum is the first book to describe how the writer's house museum came into being as a widespread cultural phenomenon across Britain, Europe, and North America. Exploring the ways that authorship has been mythologised through the conventions of the writer's house museum, The Author's Effects anatomises the how and why of the emergence, establishment, and endurance of popular notions of authorship in relation to creativity. It traces how and why the writer's bodily remains, possessions, and spaces came to be treasured in the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, as a prelude to the appearance of formal writer's house museums. It ransacks more than 100 museums and archives to tell the stories of celebrated and paradigmatic relics--Burns' skull, Keats' hair, Petrarch's cat, Poe's raven, Bronte's bonnet, Dickinson's dress, Shakespeare's chair, Austen's desk, Woolf's spectacles, Hawthorne's window, Freud's mirror, Johnson's coffee-pot and Bulgakov's stove, amongst many others. It investigates houses within which nineteenth-century writers mythologised themselves and their work--Thoreau's cabin and Dumas' tower, Scott's Abbotsford and Irving's Sunnyside. And it tracks literary tourists of the past to such long-celebrated literary homes as Petrarch's Arqua, Rousseau's Ile St Pierre, and Shakespeare's Stratford to find out what they thought and felt and did, discovering deep continuities with the redevelopment of Shakespeare's New Place for 2016.
Business & Economics

Researching Literary Tourism

Author: Charlie Mansfield

Publisher: Shadows

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 233

View: 363

Plymouth University academic, Dr Charlie Mansfield approaches literary tourism in this book initially from an historical perspective in order to define the phenomenon through a review of the existing academic literature in the field. The forms of literary tourism are analysed to provide a typology and from this the value of literary tourism is explained both from the visitor's point of view and the destination manager's. Current theories underpinning the existing literature on literary tourism, including Bourdieu's concept of cultural capital are reviewed. To extend the current state of research and to answer the research questions a case study of successful urban literary tourism is identified, in Brittany, France. The uses of French literature in literary tourism are reviewed to provide a sound basis on which to examine French texts and tourist destinations. Novel methods of field research are developed to formalise and to make reproducible the methodology for this study and for future work drawing on, and seeking to combine both literary theory and ethnography. Following a pilot study on the French Riviera the full discovery instruments are designed and applied in fieldwork on the case destination, Concarneau, using the detective novel, The Yellow Dog, which is set in Concarneau. Analysis of the findings from this provide a new contribution to the field of literary theory, in the area of reader interpellation, and answer the research questions in the form of a new set of recommendations for DMOs and tourism stakeholders. From the empirical study that used Web 2.0 social media, only available since 2013, an analysis of which novels do stimulate literary tourism is presented for the first time. Out of the research process new methods have been evolved, and are presented in the conclusion, for the DMO to synthesise and leverage digital resources. This provides DMOs with interpretation processes for its managed heritage to use with its local stakeholders in hotels and in tourism businesses. Finally, an innovative conceptualisation of what constitutes tourism knowledge is proposed.
History

Heritage and Tourism in Britain and Ireland

Author: Glenn Hooper

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 295

View: 846

This edited collection examines the natural, but sometimes troubled, relationship that exists between heritage and tourism. Chapters included focus on a selection of topics, including literary tourism, industrial heritage, conservation and care. Employing a range of historical and cultural materials, as well as an extensive number of case studies, the chapters offer an engaging overview of heritage and tourism developments across the Isles, especially in terms of recent policy and strategy initiatives, new facilities and infrastructure, as well as the different and evolving management systems currently in place. Interdisciplinary in scope, and drawing on the expertise of researchers from within both academia and industry, this volume will be of particular importance to those with interests in management and the humanities.
Heritage tourism

Heritage, Screen and Literary Tourism

Author: Sheela Agarwal

Publisher: Aspects of Tourism

ISBN:

Category: Heritage tourism

Page: 317

View: 854

This book examines the main issues and concepts relating to heritage, screen and literary tourism (HSLT) and analyses the demand and supply of HSLT within the frameworks provided by service-dominant logic and value creation to enable a critical perspective on how HSLT tourist experiences are created, produced and shaped.

Canonized in History

Author: Klara Stephanie Szlezak

Publisher: Universitatsverlag Winter

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 346

View: 755

With the help of three case studies - the homes of Longfellow, Dickinson, and Melville -, this book explores the multiple cultural implications of literary tourism, as a cultural practice emerging from an interest in writers and literature, in the context of New England. Many nineteenth-century New England writers, both canonized and challenged as the writers of the American Renaissance, became the object of tourist interest at various points in time and under diverse circumstances, and their former houses have manifold meanings within today's American tourism landscape. As sites of memory, they stand as markers of both a regional and a national literary culture. As museum spaces, they signify the perennial appeal of the private family home. As tourist sites, they engage visitors in unique and yet familiar sights and scripted performances. As both material manifestations of the canon and forms of leisure, they evidence the untenability of the divide between 'high' and popular culture.
Literary Collections

Locating Australian Literary Memory

Author: Brigid Magner

Publisher: Anthem Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 280

View: 442

'Locating Australian Literary Memory' explores the cultural meanings suffusing local literary commemorations. It is orientated around eleven authors – Adam Lindsay Gordon, Joseph Furphy, Henry Handel Richardson, Henry Lawson, A. B. ‘Banjo’ Paterson, Nan Chauncy, Katharine Susannah Prichard, Eleanor Dark, P. L. Travers, Kylie Tennant and David Unaipon – who have all been celebrated through a range of forms including statues, huts, trees, writers’ houses and assorted objects. Brigid Magner illuminates the social memory residing in these monuments and artefacts, which were largely created as bulwarks against forgetting. Acknowledging the value of literary memorials and the voluntary labour that enables them, she traverses the many contradictions, ironies and eccentricities of authorial commemoration in Australia, arguing for an expanded repertoire of practices to recognise those who have been hitherto excluded.
Antislavery movements

The Tourist

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Antislavery movements

Page:

View: 685

Business & Economics

Heritage, Screen and Literary Tourism

Author: Sheela Agarwal

Publisher: Aspects of Tourism (Hardcover)

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 317

View: 651

This book examines the main issues and concepts relating to heritage, screen and literary tourism (HSLT) and analyses the demand and supply of HSLT within the frameworks provided by service-dominant logic and value creation to enable a critical perspective on how HSLT tourist experiences are created, produced and shaped.
Literary Criticism

Literary Celebrity, Gender, and Victorian Authorship, 1850–1914

Author: Alexis Easley

Publisher: University of Delaware

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 280

View: 502

This study examines literary celebrity in Britain from 1850 to 1914 with chapters focused on a variety of Victorian authors, including Charles Dickens, Harriet Martineau, and Octavia Hill. Through lively analysis of rare cultural materials, Easley demonstrates the crucial role of the celebrity author in the formation of British national identity. As Victorians toured the homes and haunts of famous writers, they developed a sense of shared national heritage. At the same time, by reading sensational accounts of writers' lives, they were able to reconsider conventional gender roles and domestic arrangements. Women writers capitalized on celebrity media as a way of furthering their own careers and retelling British history on their own terms. Easley demonstrates how the trope of the literary celebrity was utilized for other purposes as well, including the professionalization of medicine, the development of the open space movement, and the formation of the literary canon.